Forum Index » Make Your Own Gear » unsewn, uncovered quilt (i.e. piece of raw quilt batting)


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spelt !
(spelt) - F

Locale: Midwest
unsewn, uncovered quilt (i.e. piece of raw quilt batting) on 06/10/2011 15:28:39 MDT Print View

I hammock and I need something for warmer temps. Since dirt/wet/ground contact is not an issue, I was thinking of just buying some climashield and cutting it to shape, essentially making a blanket. This hardly qualifies as MYOG, but I've never heard of anyone doing it, so I'm wondering if there's any reason why I shouldn't.

Blake Lytle
(cirrusbl) - F

Locale: Upper Peninsula
not durable on 06/10/2011 16:58:49 MDT Print View

The Climashield needs some sort of material to cover it. The insulation will stick to your skin - simply running my hand across it will start to pull off some of the fibers. Debris, like pine needles, would inevitably get in it. Pulling them out would wear it down quicker. You could try it, but I don't imagine it would be very comfortable or durable.

Javan Dempsey
(jdempsey)

Locale: The-Stateless-Society
Re: not durable on 06/10/2011 18:53:58 MDT Print View

Blake is right about this. I though about using nano-see-um before we had any breathable fabrics that were lighter, but now with the existence of M50, and new fabrics coming available, there doesn't seem to be any reason other than cost to skimp here.


Obviously the really light weight silks would be a great option, and feel very comfortable.

Dan Johnson
(Seattle)

Locale: PNW
Netting? on 06/10/2011 19:07:38 MDT Print View

Javan: Would using no-see-um work? And what would be an advantage or disadvantage of using it?

Javan Dempsey
(jdempsey)

Locale: The-Stateless-Society
Re: Netting? on 06/10/2011 19:17:07 MDT Print View

I never tried it, but I'm fairly certain it would work.


The only advantage as I saw it with nanoseeum, was the material weight, which at one time was lighter than any full weave fabric available to us. That's no longer the case however, so I no longer see an advantage other than price.


Disadvantage? Still less durable than a regular weave, probably much less so, since the mesh would be more likely to snag, and some fibers from the insulation might work their way out through the mesh, but I doubt it'd be serious. Regular No-see-um can vary in quality, weight and fineness of weave, which could introduce a lot of variables, so it really depends on the particular mesh.


Sorry, I know that's not a lot of help.

todd harper
(funnymoney) - MLife

Locale: Sunshine State
Re: Netting? on 06/10/2011 19:33:57 MDT Print View

Someone here made a vest and some other gear w/a mesh as a liner. Perhaps Aaron Sorensen? Anyway he was out West like on the PCT/JMT.

Aha....just searched and found it: http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=5734

I like his creativity.

Keep us posted on what you do!

Todd

spelt !
(spelt) - F

Locale: Midwest
Re: Re: Netting? on 06/10/2011 20:06:25 MDT Print View

Great info, everyone (especially that thread, Todd! Folks here are so creative). I'll start looking into fabrics then, since it's clear I need something to keep the insulation from snagging.

Edited by spelt on 06/10/2011 20:07:58 MDT.

todd harper
(funnymoney) - MLife

Locale: Sunshine State
Re: Netting? on 06/10/2011 20:33:18 MDT Print View

D,

You may glean something from this as well...

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=7231

Todd

Walter Carrington
(Snowleopard) - M

Locale: Mass.
silk is lighter than nanoseeum on 06/10/2011 20:42:35 MDT Print View

4.5 or 5 momme Habotai silk would be lighter than nanoseeum or noseeum.
Tulle (wedding veil) is lighter still. I think silk would work best

spelt !
(spelt) - F

Locale: Midwest
Silk is less expensive than I thought on 06/10/2011 23:11:29 MDT Print View

Looks like I have a plan, then.