Multi-Purpose Gear List
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Thom Kendall
(kendalltf) - F

Locale: IL
Multi-Purpose Gear List on 11/23/2006 15:48:05 MST Print View

I have been reading through the forum after I posted my odd gear list. I went through my closet and pulled out all the camping gear I had been given and put together a list and wanted some feedback. I am hoping to try out this equipment soon.

-Wiggys Sleep System-2 bag system (inner and outer) rated to 40F, carry weight 7lb 4oz
-Peak 1 Trekker Kit-4 piece dishes and spork 2lb 1oz
-Cabelas North Star Bivy-about 2lb
-CPF-90 GI Winter Pack-8.8 lbs
-Therma-Rest Self Inflating Pad- 2lb 8oz
-Fire Kit-3 lbs

The pack is really to big ang the sleeping system can be used separtley. In the past I have used MREs with my other gear. Your ideas and suggestions are greatly welcomed.
Thom "Wanderer" Kendall

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Multi-Purpose Gear List on 11/25/2006 12:04:26 MST Print View

Heheheh-- bait for the masses? <grin>

Maybe you have a typo on the Wiggy's-- minus 40?

The "bivy" is a one man tent and 2lbs sounds ummmmm optimistic :)

The rest would make a great kit for a Republican Congressional outing-- find a trail with the first leg climbing 2000' before you reach a switchback :)

James Ennis
(JimEnnis) - F

Locale: South
re:multi-purpose gear on 11/26/2006 16:24:43 MST Print View

Thom:
Didn't see anything on that list that I would haul up the trail. All of these items could easily be changed out for much lighter items and give you more comfort.

Adam Rothermich
(aroth87) - F

Locale: Missouri Ozarks
Re: Multi-Purpose Gear List on 11/26/2006 16:52:58 MST Print View

If you really want to use the gear you have now I would suggest taking only one or the other of the Wiggy's bags, not both since chances are you won't be encountering -40* temps. Also just take one piece of the cook system that will suffice for all of your cooking needs. If you are using the type of MRE's I'm thinking of you shouldn't even need a cook set or stove since they have the chemical heater with them. I'm not sure what the 'Fire kit' is, but its really heavy.
No offense, but you would probably be better off starting over and buying new gear. If you've never been hiking before and are just trying it out with some gear you have or were lent, chances are you won't have much fun carrying that much weight. Otherwise do your research on these and other forums and find gear that other people recommend. Ask questions if you have them, but find some high quality, lighter gear that fits your budget. Learning how to make your own gear is a skill that will save you money and weight.

Adam

Eric Noble
(ericnoble) - MLife

Locale: Colorado Rockies
Re: Multi-Purpose Gear List on 11/26/2006 22:12:43 MST Print View

Thom,
I saw your previous post with the very spartan gear list. So... if you understand the extremes do you also understand what's in between? You need to give us the where or when, or the conditions under which this gear list will be used, for meaningful comment. The details of your fire kit will probably be needed as well. The rest seems self explanatory.

Edited by ericnoble on 11/26/2006 22:13:19 MST.

Thom Kendall
(kendalltf) - F

Locale: IL
Re: Re: Multi-Purpose Gear List on 11/27/2006 10:40:28 MST Print View

Eric please accept my apology for the confusion. You said you have read my previous thread so maybe can understand why I am trying to move from wool blankets and canvas to more modern camping equipment. The supplies listed above were given to me and a few I bought for the purpose of this move. I live in WV but travel around quite a bit. My next campout should be in December after my finals are done. The tempature should not get below zero but the windchill might. We have had an incredibly warm fall (high 60's today) so it is hard to tell. My fire kit includes flint and steel, matches dipped in wax, a candle, and odd tinder with dried pine cones if I have any. The main idea behind the post was that even though they are not ulw are they decent enough to begin with.

Sam Haraldson
(sharalds) - MLife

Locale: Gallatin Range
Multi-Purpose Gear List on 11/27/2006 10:51:39 MST Print View

If I was going to try any of that gear out I would do it at a campground that I drove a car to. I've been backpacking for less than ten years and I carried a really heavy pack on one trip. After that I started pairing the weight down.

Eric Noble
(ericnoble) - MLife

Locale: Colorado Rockies
Re: Re: Re: Multi-Purpose Gear List on 11/28/2006 09:59:02 MST Print View

Thom, no need to apologize. I was just intrigued by the contrast between the two posts. To show one of many alternatives, let me compare my gear to yours.

-Wiggys Sleep System-2 bag system (inner and outer) rated to 40F, carry weight 7lb 4oz
I have no experience with this sleep system but have read mixed reviews. I assume it is rated to -40°F, not 40°F. Do you know what each bag weighs and how they rate separately? When talking about sleep systems, your clothing should also be considered. I have a JacksRBetter No Sniveller quilt (1.4 lbs) that I use all year long. When it's cold I carry a Western Mountaineering Versalite Super (2.4 lbs) that is rated to 10°F. Combining the quilt and the Versalite probably gets me below -10°F. I'm not sure as I haven't pushed the lower limit yet. I've never needed to go to -40°F. My system is all down, which might not be recommended for wet environments. My clothing is wool and synthetic insulation to balance the down.

-Peak 1 Trekker Kit-4 piece dishes and spork 2lb 1oz
I use an Orikaso Bowl XL (1.4 oz) and a Light My Fire Spork (0.35 oz). If I'm cooking I carry a cheap Heineken beer can pot (1.23 oz) or a titanium pot (3 oz).

-Cabelas North Star Bivy-about 2lb
I sleep in a Hennessy Hammock (2.6 lbs). My Equinox Bivy weighs 6.5 oz but I don't often use it.

-CPF-90 GI Winter Pack-8.8 lbs
I use a GoLite Jam that weighs 1.32 lbs. I think it can be found on clearance for about $60. The less weight you carry the less pack you need. The Jam is very durable, has ice axe loops and good compression.

-Therma-Rest Self Inflating Pad- 2lb 8oz
I use a ProLite 4 at 1.5 lbs. In the winter you might need more than a Prolite 4. Yours might be fine for the winter. Check the R rating. You could go a lot lighter for 3 season use but I like the comfort. I am looking to lighten my load here.

-Fire Kit-3 lbs
Mine consists of: Alcohol Hand Gel (1 oz at 1.3 oz), Matches (4) & Trick Candles (4) (.35 oz), Spark-Lite & Tinder (6) (.35 oz), a Fresnel lens, and an Esbit tablet. All well under 3 oz and I could be accused of overkill.

I've compared my gear to yours, not to say mine is the best but to simply show an alternative. Mine is a work in progress that works for me and may not work for others. For certain cases your gear is entirely appropriate, but I think you are embarking on a fun learning curve.

I see you are a member, but possibly new enough that you haven't had a chance to read all the content on the site. I would recommend doing so and creating a complete gear list, including every thing you would take from the skin out. This will give you a bigger picture of how things work together. Then you can enjoy the testing (outings), which is what we are all here for, I presume.

Edited by ericnoble on 11/28/2006 10:03:29 MST.

Eric Noble
(ericnoble) - MLife

Locale: Colorado Rockies
Re: Multi-Purpose Gear List on 11/28/2006 10:11:00 MST Print View

More advise, for what it's worth. Rather than creating a multipurpose list, create lists for specific outings and generalize from there. I would start from easy (summer) and work my way to hard (winter), though spring and fall can be quite challenging.

Edited by ericnoble on 11/28/2006 10:12:07 MST.

Glenn Roberts
(garkjr) - F

Locale: Southwestern Ohio
Re: Re: Multi-Purpose Gear List on 11/28/2006 10:36:58 MST Print View

Thom:

Send me a Private Mail (PM); I've been going through my gear closet (aka "basement") to move some gear along - I've got some lightweight alternatives that I'd be willing to send along to you that might help your progression toward a lighter pack.

I'm not a true ultralighter; my normal summer weekend base weight is around 14 - 15 pounds (depends on whether I decide my Thermarest chair kit is an essential or luxury for a given trip), with a total pack weight of around 20 pounds. I'd also be glad to forward you my gear list, just to give you an idea of the lightweight items that are readily available from "mainstream" manufacturers.

Thom Kendall
(kendalltf) - F

Locale: IL
Re: Re: Multi-Purpose Gear List on 11/28/2006 12:08:58 MST Print View

Eric,
I thank you for your advice. I have begun to read gear reviews, list, and the special Excel program. I did not realize there were companies that specialized in ULW gear. I have noticed that the gear list are very area and season specific. This makes alot of sence when you are aware of it. You have given me alot of meat to chew on. Thank you and all whohave given very nice replies.

Thom Kendall
(kendalltf) - F

Locale: IL
Re: Re: Re: Multi-Purpose Gear List on 12/13/2006 13:22:22 MST Print View

For anyone interested, I tried out the above mentioned equipment. Boy did that bag seem heavy going up the mountain. It kept tight to my body and did not rub so that is a plus. The bivy locked in body heat raising the interior tempature 5-10 degrees. I did not get cold so and I only used the exterior bag. The cook set did not work so well over an open fire. Overall I would say I am going to continue with my other gear list because it is lighter and easier to use.