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Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter
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Ken Helwig
(kennyhel77) - MLife

Locale: Scotts Valley CA via San Jose, CA
Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter on 05/26/2011 15:49:08 MDT Print View

Has anyone seen this or have it??? I just found this and was wondering. Looks ineresting. It weighs in at 3 oz.

http://www.sawyer.com/SP131.htm

Rick Dreher
(halfturbo) - MLife

Locale: Northernish California
Re: Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter on 05/26/2011 16:03:35 MDT Print View

Nice find! It must be quite new; I've neither seen nor heard of it before. If the pouches hold up I could see this becoming quite popular. (I wonder what the cleaning syringe is?)

Cheers,

Rick

Ken Helwig
(kennyhel77) - MLife

Locale: Scotts Valley CA via San Jose, CA
Re: Re: Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter on 05/26/2011 16:09:51 MDT Print View

Rick, I just got the new Backpacker and saw an advertisement for it. Looks promising! I too was looking at the syringe and wondering what it is for....backflushing????? You get three bags with it too. 3 ounces....hmmmm

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter on 05/26/2011 16:33:12 MDT Print View

The product ad does not state what the lifetime of the filter is, like 100 gallons or whatever.

--B.G.--

John S.
(jshann) - F
Re: Re: Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter on 05/26/2011 16:56:10 MDT Print View

Betting the filter has the same life as other Sawyer filters. The syringe should be for backflushing, same as for other Sawyer products including a syringe.

Edited by jshann on 05/26/2011 16:56:40 MDT.

Rick Dreher
(halfturbo) - MLife

Locale: Northernish California
Re: Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter on 05/26/2011 17:09:49 MDT Print View

"Betting the filter has the same life as other Sawyer filters. The syringe should be for backflushing, same as for other Sawyer products including a syringe."

Agreed, it's a slight reworking of the standard Sawyer 0.1µm filter, in which case it's basically a "lifetime" warranty, per Sawyer. Other Sawyer filters come with a faucet backflush adapter and they tell you for field backwashing to force clean water back through the filter using a water bag and hose. The "syringe" that comes with this one might be an irrigation syringe with some sort of fitting.

Need to get my mitts on one!

Cheers,

Rick

Ken Helwig
(kennyhel77) - MLife

Locale: Scotts Valley CA via San Jose, CA
Re: Re: Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter on 05/26/2011 17:12:19 MDT Print View

Rick, Ebay has them for $49.95


and yes, the syringe is indeed used for backflushing in the field. The directions on how to do that are on the bags that come with the filter

Edited by kennyhel77 on 05/26/2011 17:19:48 MDT.

Doug Reeves
(strawman) - F

Locale: God's Country
1 million gallon guarantee on 05/26/2011 20:40:37 MDT Print View

The ad in the newest Backpacker says it has a one million gallon guarantee.

Ryan C
(radio_guy) - MLife

Locale: Alaska
Re: Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter on 05/26/2011 22:32:38 MDT Print View

Very cool. Since there is a threaded cap, is there a possibility some sort of small carbon filter element could be attached? Possibly MYOG? I have contemplated converting my MSR Hyperflow into a gravity feed with a screw on carbon element but this new Sawyer looks much better.

Link .
(annapurna) - MLife
Re: Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter on 05/26/2011 23:16:38 MDT Print View

http://alanrayneroutdoors.blogspot.com/2011/05/water-filter-sawyer-squeeze.html

Dean F.
(acrosome) - MLife

Locale: Back in the Front Range
review on 05/27/2011 04:28:24 MDT Print View

Lot's of info on sawyer filters in the reader reviews:

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/reviews/display_reviews?forum_thread_id=5536&cat=Hydration%20-%20Water%20Treatment&cid=55

But bear in mind that some of them date back to 2007. For instance, there is a lot of discussion on how to MYOG a gravity setup. (Sawyer now makes one.)

I love my Sawyer, and don't understand why more people don't use them. They seem to be the Perfect Filter.

Tim Zen
(asdzxc57) - F

Locale: MI
Re: review on 05/27/2011 05:19:40 MDT Print View

Filter and other water treatment methods are on the wiki in Gear:Water

Heath Pitts
(heathpitts)

Locale: Nashville
Sawyer on 05/27/2011 06:26:18 MDT Print View

Dean, I have to agree with you on the Sawyer filters. I used their inline model on my MYOG gravity filter last weekend and it was great. The flow was much higher than I expected. These squeeze filters look like a good addition to their lineup

Randy Smith
(PapaSmurf) - F

Locale: Dream Hammock
Very promising on 06/02/2011 09:07:01 MDT Print View

Mine came in the other day. Looks good, but I haven't yet put any water through it.

Couple observations/thoughts.
The top (or dirty) end is a female threaded "2 liter bottle sized" opening which the included bag or alternate bottle or bag can attach.

The bottom (or clean) end is a male threaded "2 liter bottle sized" opening which the push/pull cap is attached.

I'm kinda thinking that this filter may be the perfect "one size fits all" filter I've been looking for.

Should be easy enough to rig it as a gravity filter by fitting it with hoses and adapters. Use as purchased for a squeeze filter. Used to top 1 liter bottles on a solo trip.

If folks are interested, I'd be happy to take a couple photos and share them.

Thomas Budge
(budgthom) - F

Locale: Idaho
photos/tests on 06/02/2011 10:30:50 MDT Print View

I would certainly be interested in photos, how easy it squeezes, and how effective it is when used in a gravity setup.

Randy Smith
(PapaSmurf) - F

Locale: Dream Hammock
photos/tests on 06/02/2011 19:24:06 MDT Print View

I put a few photos and some initial test results and weights on this web page.
http://www.mydiygear.com/pages/other-gear/sawyer-sp132.php

Alex H
(abhitt) - MLife

Locale: southern appalachians or desert SW
Re: photos/tests on 06/03/2011 04:37:10 MDT Print View

Randy, great work on the photos and write up. Looks promising, thanks.

Donna C
(leadfoot) - M

Locale: Middle Virginia
Re: Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter on 06/03/2011 05:50:50 MDT Print View

I have a question about these filters....is anyone concerned about them not removing viruses? I was thinking of using a setup like the sawyer, but no viruses are removed. I use a Steripen right now and wondered about this. Anyone?

Randy Smith
(PapaSmurf) - F

Locale: Dream Hammock
Viruses? on 06/03/2011 06:51:14 MDT Print View

This will be the only filter I carry this summer on my hikes.
Possibly someone more knowledgable can answer questions concerning viruses?

Tony Wong
(Valshar) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter on 06/03/2011 12:39:59 MDT Print View

Donna,

Consensus seems to be that viruses are not an issue in the States.

Not sure why, but does not seem to be an issue.

I have been using the Sawyer filter for about 3 years now as my only water treatment on my hikes in the SF Bay Area and the Sierras.

Never had an issue, never been sick, still using the same ole filter with no problems.

If you are concerned about that, you could add chemicals to the water after treating or you might be better off with a Steripen.

I like the Sawyer because I psychologically don't like the idea of particles and chunky things in the water I drink and the Sawyer takes care of that for me and is faster than chemicals.

Nothing wrong with the Steripen at all....have a friend who used it for 9 days on the Tahoe Rim Trail with no problem, so I know it works too.

-Tony

Rafi Harzahav
(rhz10) - F

Locale: SF Bay Area
Buying this filter from Sawyer's website. on 06/03/2011 15:14:25 MDT Print View

It's interesting because there's a version with three pouches and a version with only one pouch. Both seem to cost the same???

https://www.sawyersafetravel2.com/checkout.asp

Donna C
(leadfoot) - M

Locale: Middle Virginia
Re: Re: Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter on 06/04/2011 15:46:35 MDT Print View

Tony,
Thanks for the info. I was just curious as to why no concern about the viruses. Like you, I'm not fond of the floaters and all, but I do filter them out. I like the Steripen. I do collect a few liters of water for camp and the inline filter wold be a nice thing to use.

Hoot Filsinger
(filsinger) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter on 06/04/2011 16:26:04 MDT Print View

Hey Ken,

I just put up a review with pics here:

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/reviews/display_reviews?forum_thread_id=48761&cat=Hydration%20%2D%20Water%20Treatment&cid=55

Bill

Randy Smith
(PapaSmurf) - F

Locale: Dream Hammock
*** Update 7/18/2011 *** on 07/18/2011 11:14:28 MDT Print View

Just got back from a week-long hike on the AT (Ensign Cowall to Pine Grove State Park) using this filter and have a few additional thoughts.

Our group - We had 12 total people in our group and hiked in small groups of 3 or 4. We had a gravity filter, a pump filter, my Sawyer Squeeze filter, and 1 or 2 that used Aqua Mira. As each small group reached a water source, whoever had a filter treated water for their group. I usually ended up filtering 6-8 or so liters each time.

Rubber washer - The rubber washer fits into the filter too loosely and falls out quite easily. Need to either put a spare in the kit or check my local hardware store for a slightly larger one that will stay in place.

Push/Pull Cap - Aiming the stream of water was easy and flow was plenty fast enough to allow me to hold the bag at an angle so that any untreated water dripping off the bag wouldn't accidently fall into the water bottle. I originally thought I might replace this cap, but I'll keep it like it is for now.

Extra Scoop Needed - Several of the water sources we encountered were no more than 2-3 inches deep. This made filling the water bag more difficult. I forgot to bring a scoop and had to use someone else's cup to fill the water bag one cup at a time. This was slow and tedious. I think I'll probably cut the top off a plastic water bottle and carry a .5 liter scoop with this kit.

2 Liter Bag - On the second morning of our hike, just North of PenMar. I filtered several liters of water and filled the provided 2 liter bag to top off bottles after the climb up to Deer Lick Shelter. Another hiker fastened it under the lid of his pack. Halfway up the hill, the bag fell from the pack landing on a rock and burst. No more bag. Fortunately, I had an extra 2 liter Platypus bag with me.

Capacity - The high temperatures in Southern PA last week ranged from 84 to 93 degrees. We went through alot of water! I was able filter water for myself and 2-3 others easily and quickly (except for filling the water bag).

Cleaning Syringe - I carried the syringe because I was unsure how long it would take for the filter to become partially clogged and slow. Never used it. The flow from the filter never varied one bit after filtering dozens of liters during the entire week. I did, however thoroughly backflush the filter with tap water upon my return home. I'm convinced that the syringe can stay at home for weekend trips.

Edited by PapaSmurf on 07/18/2011 11:17:51 MDT.

Rakesh Malik
(Tamerlin)

Locale: Cascadia
Re: *** Update 7/18/2011 *** on 07/18/2011 11:37:28 MDT Print View

Your experience sounds encouraging. I just got one myself, because my Steripen didn't work on my last outing (I think due to dead batteries, though I replaced them after I got back from Africa a few months ago). I ordered mine from Saftey Products International, for $45 + shipping, and they included an extra pouch attached to the outside of the package. I haven't had a chance to try it out in the field yet... hopefully that will happen this coming weekend :)

Tony Wong
(Valshar) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: *** Update 7/18/2011 *** on 07/18/2011 13:11:02 MDT Print View

Randy,

Great review of how it worked for you...appreciate hearing your real world experience.

I took a trip about 3 weeks ago to Hetch Hetchy Resevior in Yosemite and rigged two platypus 1L bottles together with the old black colored sawyer filter to approximate the squeeze bottle and it worked great.

In this configuration, I simply could backflush the filter by squeezing on the clean bag to force the water back through easily. Being a closed system, it did not require much pressure to back flush the filter.

Question for you Randy: does it look like you could screw on two platypus bags, one on each end? (Clean and dirty bag).

-Tony

Randy Smith
(PapaSmurf) - F

Locale: Dream Hammock
Re: Re: *** Update 7/18/2011 *** on 07/19/2011 08:51:42 MDT Print View

That's exactly what I'm thinking. I recieved 2 Aquasimple Bottle Caps from Arrowhead Equipment last night, but didn't have time to play with them. I also plan to order a "tornado tube" http://www.amazon.com/Tornado-Tube-Tubes/dp/B0006Z8YBQ or something very similar.

My goal is one filter that can be reconfigured to serve all my needs (solo, small group and large group). I think this product just might be the best starting point.

Tony Wong
(Valshar) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Attaching Two Platy Bottle to Sawyer Squeeze Filter on 07/19/2011 12:52:17 MDT Print View

Randy,

Sounds intriguing.

Once you get your setup together, maybe you can post some photos of what it looks like.

-Tony

Rafi Harzahav
(rhz10) - F

Locale: SF Bay Area
Using Platypus bottles with new Sawyer filter.... on 07/19/2011 16:24:13 MDT Print View

Hi Randy,

I bought this new Sawyer filter, but I've found that my Platypus soft bottles do not form a tight seal on either the input or the output of the filter. This was somewhat disappointing. Was this your experience also?

Thanks,

rhz

Hoot Filsinger
(filsinger) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Using Platypus bottles with new Sawyer filter.... on 07/19/2011 17:04:49 MDT Print View

Hey Rafi,
Are you using the enclosed white hose washer in the fittings? If not this will solve your leaks. I bought extras at my local ACE because they are easy to lose. I also adapted this filter as a gravity filter using the hose fitting at arrowhwad equipment.It has good flow with about a 2 foot hose.
http://arrowheadequipment.webs.com/apps/webstore/products/show/1191146

Randy,
Nice call on the tornado tube fitting.Now back flushing is made easy using any platy or any thin water bottle (no need to take the syringe).

Bill

Rafi Harzahav
(rhz10) - F

Locale: SF Bay Area
Hi Bill on 07/19/2011 17:29:36 MDT Print View

I'll try it again when I get home, but it seemed like the entire Platypus threading was simply incompatible with the filter input. (I did try it with the washer.)

Randy Smith
(PapaSmurf) - F

Locale: Dream Hammock
Platypus Thread on 07/19/2011 19:45:39 MDT Print View

I too found that my Platypus bag was a little more difficult to screw on, but if I used firm pressure while screwing on the filter, it sealed just fine.

The Platypus bag has fewer threads than the provided Sawyer bag.

The tornado tube is on order. I will report back the results.

Curtis B.
(rutilate) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
You convinced me... on 07/20/2011 09:56:16 MDT Print View

You all convinced me. Thanks for posting details and pics--you've given me everything I need to purchase and duplicate your setups!

Hoot Filsinger
(filsinger) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Using Platypus bottles with new Sawyer filter.... on 07/20/2011 19:10:15 MDT Print View

Randy,

Because I am a science teacher I already had a Tornado Tube (TT) in my room to try out.I found you need to modify it by cutting (I used a bandsaw)about 1/4 inch off each end this allows Platys and other standard drinking bottles to seat into the threads. The seals are tight using the TT so washers are not needed. This is an excellent setup for backflushing and eliminates the need for the syringe. The modified TT weighs 12 grams vs 35 grams for the bulky syringe. I found this setup also works as a gravity feed system (see photos) without the need for tubing which is an added bonus.I included a photo of the arrowhead equipment adaptor but I doubt I will use this as the TT does it all.

modified tornado tube on filtergravity feedsystem

Randy Smith
(PapaSmurf) - F

Locale: Dream Hammock
Sawyer Squeeze + Platypus + Tornado Tube on 07/20/2011 20:32:13 MDT Print View

Thanks Bill for doing the legwork. Good news about the Tornado Tube fitting tightly.

Richard Brownkatz
(Rbrownkatz) - F

Locale: Southeast
Tornado Tube? on 07/22/2011 11:01:39 MDT Print View

Would someone please explain the Tornado Tube and its use here?
I Googled it and found what seems to be just a science project.
Thanks.

Randy Smith
(PapaSmurf) - F

Locale: Dream Hammock
Re: Tornado Tube? on 07/22/2011 11:18:02 MDT Print View

It is a small plastic fitting used to join two 2 liters bottles together. Bill could likely give us the science lecture behind how it works. For our purposes, it is a fitting that will join the Sawyer Squeeze male threaded end directly to the male threads on a Platypus bottle. You can see the fitting a couple posts back. It's the blue object.

Edited by PapaSmurf on 07/22/2011 11:19:25 MDT.

Richard Brownkatz
(Rbrownkatz) - F

Locale: Southeast
Thanks on 07/22/2011 11:35:07 MDT Print View

Thanks Randy

Curtis B.
(rutilate) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
What about using the quick disconnect? on 07/25/2011 12:22:50 MDT Print View

What do you think of using the Sawyer quick disconnect male + female listed here: https://www.sawyersafetravel2.com/moreinformation.asp?pid=169?

I've sent an email asking for the weight in ounces.

I am thinking about using the quick disconnect to more easily connect to a 2L platypus bladder without having to unpack the bladder every time I refill.

Would you put it in the tubing near the top of the pack or nearest the mouthpiece? I'm leaning towards the former to keep it from swinging around. Unpacking the lid to plug in and refill is ok, unpacking the whole pack to remove the bladder is a pain.

Thoughts?

Randy Smith
(PapaSmurf) - F

Locale: Dream Hammock
Re: What about using the quick disconnect? on 07/25/2011 19:01:44 MDT Print View

Makes sense for anyone using it as a hydration bladder.

Dean F.
(acrosome) - MLife

Locale: Back in the Front Range
Viruses on 07/25/2011 22:49:38 MDT Print View

The 0.02 micron "viral" filter that Sawyer makes is meant for people traveling in third world countries where getting hepatitis from the tapwater is a real concern. For the United States backcountry the 0.1 micron filter should cover you. IIRC it JUST BARELY misses the FDA criteria for a water purifier, as opposed to a water filter- I think that to be called a water purifier a device must remove 5 log of viruses, so 99.998% removal FAILS.

But most viral human-pathogen contamination in North American water sources comes from human waste, as opposed to bacterial or protozoan contamination which can come from stock or wild animals. So if you are in the back country you're probably safe as long as you aren't downstream from a sewage treatment facility or outhouse.

But make your own choices (HYOH).

Kevin Kingma
(MrKingma) - F
Comparing the 2 Sawyers on 08/08/2011 17:42:01 MDT Print View

I'll be buying my first Sawyer filter system soon and need to choose between the SP121 and SP131 filter elements. I can get the SP121 for $30. Anyone have any opinion/info. as to which would be better? Would squeeze and gravity flow rates be similar between the two filters? Are the SP131 squeeze bags reliable or likely to get holes if accidentally scraped against rough granite? (I'll be using the same setups with needed connectors as nicely described in the previous posts - thanks.)

Michael Davis
(mad777) - F

Locale: South Florida
Re: Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter on 08/08/2011 18:48:07 MDT Print View

When I saw Randy's post about this filter on another forum, I immediately ordered one. Since I am anti-chemical (except for backup) and anti steripen (mine failed) this seemed to be the ticket to lightening up from my gravity filter.

I was not disappointed. As a matter of fact, I am thrilled with this setup!
(A big Thank You to Randy).

From my digital scale:

Filter = 2.5 oz
2 L Pouch = 1.0 oz
Backflush syringe = 1.2 oz

Grand total = 4.7 oz

BUT, for a weekend you don't need the backflush syringe, so....

Weekend total = 3.5 oz

BTW: I have noticed several medical professionals post on here that irrigating a wound is very important. The syringe that comes with the Sawyer Squeeze would be perfect for that.

Ben Crocker
(alexdrewreed) - M

Locale: Kentucky
Sawyer on 08/08/2011 18:55:56 MDT Print View

This filter looks nice. I would love to get A couple of opinions, though. Can I leave a backup option at home? Can you screw this on a bottle and suck water out like you can on the Frontier Pro?

Tyler H
(ctwnwood) - F

Locale: Utah
Sawyer has lots of videos on youtube on 08/08/2011 21:40:30 MDT Print View

I guess you can't embed on BPL, should have known better.

Edited by ctwnwood on 08/08/2011 21:41:02 MDT.

Kevin Kingma
(MrKingma) - F
best Sawyer filter on 08/21/2011 16:38:38 MDT Print View

1) Do the Sawyer squeeze bags appear to be as durable as similar size Platypus bags?

2) Would the older style Sawyer filter (SP 121/122) connected to a 1L Platy bag with an inch of tubing as a squeeze system work as well/fast as the new SP 131 squeeze system?

David Vo
(sygyzy)
Re: *** Update 7/18/2011 *** on 08/22/2011 01:24:57 MDT Print View

My heart sank when I read about needing an extra scoop for the bag. Why doesn't someone make a bottle or bag with a large opening on one end and an attached filter on the other? For example, a Clean Bottle (http://cleanbottle.com/g) with a Sawyer Filter on one end. That way you can scoop the water up, even from shallow sources, cap the scoop side, attach a filter on the other end and squeeze to filter. I am still looking for the ultimate filter setup and almost all the ones I read require carrying some sort of hacked Gatorade bottle to be used as a scoop.

Kevin Kingma
(MrKingma) - F
@ D. Vo on 08/22/2011 10:21:54 MDT Print View

I agree, that is one of the flaws of this new system. The squeeze system requires a squeezable water collecting/feed bag. No mfg. makes a lightweight bag that has a reliable zip lock top that will hold under squeeze pressure and that has a bottom connection port to attach to the filter.

My suggestion would be to make one using something like a Sea To Summit 4 Liter Ultra-Sil Dry Sack (0.9 oz.). It has a large top opening for reasonably easy water collection, and a roll top closure with stiffener that should withstand / aid in squeezing water thru a filter. The connecting port to a filter could be easily DIYed using parts from USPlastics.

(and thanks for reminding me about the **update** post. It sounds like the Sawyer squeeze bags are not as sturdy as a platypus bag.)

KEN LARSON
(KENLARSON) - MLife

Locale: Western Michigan
Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter AND PURIFIER systems on 08/22/2011 13:32:31 MDT Print View

I have been “lurking” on this thread since its inception and feel it’s time to disseminate some facts and information from my personal experiences. One reason for me delving deeply into the water aspects of backpacking recently is because with my compromised immune system due the two stem cell transplants for multiple myeloma cancer. I cannot take ANY chances with ANY source of water. I have use chemical and filters to treat water prior to my dx of 2003 and after 2003 the Sawyer SP 125 PURIFIER in a GRAVITY MODE. I have a Squeeze system with a SAWYER SQUEEZE BAG (1.5L) (1.0oz set up and a SP 121/122 FILTER when I have backpacked with my grandchildren (ages 11 to 9) so they can get into the act of “making water” for their use. I also have a GEIGERRIG Hydration Engine system set up for use with the Sawyer SP 125 PURIFIER for areas that I will have difficulty with my Sawyer SP 125 PURIFIER gravity system (drawback to this system is weight).

Now to the posting above:

“I agree that is one of the flaws of this new system. The squeeze system requires a squeezable water collecting/feed bag.”

>>>> If you use a Sawyer’s squeeze bag (eg. SAWYER SQUEEZE WATER BAG 64oz/1.9L (1.0oz), with the necessary parts and tubing connected to a SP 121/122 FILTER or a SP194/SP190 PURIFIER you can squeeze water into any container.
My system: SAWYER WATER FILTER wet (.1 micron) (3.65oz) /SAWYER SQUEEZE BAG (1.5L) (1.0oz), HOSE ASSEMBLY 1.25oz/FLUSHING SYRINGE (1.12oz)/STUFF BAG (.35oz) - 6.2oz
If you purchase the Sawyer bag (s) (use as a squeeze bag backup) for a collection bag with your SP 121/122 FILTER ….you have a light system (see above and you further lighten this system by eliminating the FLUSHING SYRINGE (1.12oz) & STUFF BAG). Using a SP194/SP190 PURIFIER WITH a Sawyer squeeze bag is DIFFICULT to produce the flow compared to the SP 121/122 FILTER or a hand pump FILTER….I would NOT recommend from my experiences. I have NOT use a Sawyer product with a Platy bag so I cannot give any feedback on that.

“No mfg. makes a lightweight bag that has a reliable zip lock top that will hold under squeeze pressure and that has a bottom connection port to attach to the filter.”

>>>>Checked out GEIGERRIG Hydration Engine (http://www.geigerrig.com/ ) 3 L RESERVOIR - 4.0oz very Bomb Proof and while this system is a "squeeze system” it uses an internal pressurized system that is quite unique, that will force water through the SP 121/122 FILTER or a SP194/SP190 PURIFIER with ease BUT at different rates. I believe the Sawyer bag (though it does not have a zip lock top) will be reliable, though further testing/use on my part is needed to make any definitive statements. Check out johntsmith@sawyerproducts.com at Sawyer for further information and/or clarification on this issue.

Heading to Isle Royale Nation Park with the wife for nine trip tomorrow to walk the Minong Trail for the second time take in some wilderness. (There are issues with water in certain areas on the island but beyond this discussion.)

Cheers

Tony Wong
(Valshar) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter AND PURIFIER systems on 08/22/2011 13:59:36 MDT Print View

I just came back from a 16 day JMT trip and used my old "black" 1st gen Sawyer Filter (not the purifier) for the whole trip.

For this trip, I used a squeeze bag system of 1 dirty water 1L Platypus and 1L Platypus for clean water.

System worked well enough, but my hands got tired after 3L of water....was filtering for my buddies.

The Platypus bags really can take the abuse and held up fine.

Backflushing was simply squeezing the clean bag to force water back through the filter.

After 16 days, it did seem like the Sawyer was slowing down a little bit...maybe needed a more complete flushing from a faucet, but worked good enough or I was simply impatient or tired on the trail at the end.

I am very interested in getting the squeeze bottle system to see if the rate of flow is better than the inline filter that I am using.

Anyway, thought I would share....old filter can be adapted to function like the new squeeze bottle one.

-Tony

David Vo
(sygyzy)
Re: Re: Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter AND PURIFIER systems on 08/22/2011 14:09:56 MDT Print View

@Tony - Can you clarify which 1L Platypus you used exactly? Soft bottle? Plus bottle? Hoser?

Tony Wong
(Valshar) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter AND PURIFIER systems on 08/22/2011 15:00:17 MDT Print View

David,

Sorry about the lack of details on the Platypus.

I am using the soft bottles, 1L, for my rigged Squeeze bottle knock off system.

I have a few of the old, discontinuted Platypus filter links that allow me to screw onto the Platypus bottles on either end of the Sawyer filter to make my connections.

NOT using the Big Zip closure system.

I use Sawyer as a gravity filter in camp with a 4L Platypus water tank, that has a zip lock closure system that is just OKAY.

Was a bit harder to seal up tight with cold water and wet hands.

My water tank is a few years old, so wonder if it is losing the "softness" that made it soooo easy to close when brand new.

Once sealed, you can squeeze the water tank too....even lean on it to apply pressure....not sure I would sit on a water tank though.

-Tony

Kevin Kingma
(MrKingma) - F
Sawyer squeezer on 09/12/2011 23:46:31 MDT Print View

The squeeze bags supplied with the SP 131/2 are probably like the new packaging I've seen for laundry detergent and pet foods, sturdy enough to resist granite scrape holes and almost as strong as Platy bags.

The Geigerrig system bag is a little heavier than I want, but I enjoyed the video they have of throwing one out of a truck going 100mph to show how sturdy it is!

Optimally, the water collection bag would have an open top to make collecting and cleaning the bag easy (the Sawyer squeeze bags wouldn't work to collect water in shallow desert springs). The best water collection/dirty water bag seems to be a sil-nylon bag with stiffener/roll top. It seems others have made/used these for gravity systems, but I haven't read anything about their use in a squeeze system.

M B
(livingontheroad) - M
water collection on 09/13/2011 03:08:20 MDT Print View

ziplock can be used to collect very shallow water, then pour into other container

Mike Muralt
(mmuralt) - M
Making your own dry sack water filter system on 10/12/2011 07:47:25 MDT Print View

Has anybody taken a ultra-sil dry sack and used parts from USPlastics (or something else) to add a water tube coming out of the sack. Seems like it would be difficult to get a good seal with this slippery material. If you've succeeded I'd like to know how you did it. Thanks!

Laura Lee Hughes
(hughesl) - F
Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter on 10/20/2011 17:54:37 MDT Print View

Just used one of these in the Grand Canyon last weekend. Very light, very quick and easy to use. It can be awkward to try to fill the "dirty" water bag because it is such a small opening, but we used a cup when we couldn't find a place where the water was "falling" to make it easy to fill the bag. The bags seemed durable but on the third day we developed a pinhole in the bottom of the larger bag. We could still filter easily but it created a drip of dirty water down the side of the bag. For anyone who has trouble with their hands from repetitive motion activities, squeezing the bag to move the water through the filter is a great alternative to traditional water filters. We filtered a lot of water very quickly. One person was filling dirty water bags (we took two), one person was squeezing the bag attached to the filter, and the other was holding the clean water containers. The threading on/off of the filter to the bag was very quick.
I have been unable to see how to use gravity to make this system work since we always had to force the water (by squeezing the bag) to push it through the filter.

Rakesh Malik
(Tamerlin)

Locale: Cascadia
Re: Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter on 10/21/2011 13:06:54 MDT Print View

My experience so far has been similar. One of my two bottles, the smaller one in my case, started leaking a bit around the rim where the nozzle is. So far, that's been the only problem with the filter.

I've forced the water through the filter every time also, otherwise it takes quite a while. I think it would work by gravity alone, but pretty slowly. Maybe if you hang it high enough to have a larger hydrostatic head it would work reasonably well, but I haven't tried that.

I also found that the push-pull filter makes a handy faucet for washing one's hands; I place the bag full of water under one arm, tip it downward with the valve open, and squeeze gently with my arm. Quite convenient. :)

Stephen Barber
(grampa) - MLife

Locale: SoCal
Another leak on 10/21/2011 13:33:30 MDT Print View

My squeeze filter also started leaking on the third day of use. The leak was at the end of the throat base. Sawyer claimed I had been "wringing" the bag (voids the warrantee), which I did not. Still, they replaced the bag, which was nice of them.

I still like the system, it's certainly quicker than my gravity Sawyer/Platypus system, but I'm hesitant about depending upon a system which starts leaking dirty water within a few days of use.

John Smith
(CSNeoM4A1) - F
Question on 10/21/2011 13:52:28 MDT Print View

Are these failures you guys are having simply the dirty water bag? Or they the filter itself.

Could dirty water bag failures be fixed by using a platy bag instead?

Andy F
(AndyF) - M

Locale: Midwest/Midatlantic
Re: Another leak on 10/21/2011 14:05:22 MDT Print View

Yeah, a platy would work. I already carry a 3 liter one, and plan on that being my backup in case the dirty water bag fails.

Mine isn't leaking, but it has seen little use yet. I purchased it a little over a month ago, and it came with a piece of paper stating that the bags are not covered under warranty. This makes me think they've had quite a few issues with the bags. ;)

Brian Austin
(footeab) - F

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Another leak on 10/21/2011 14:29:38 MDT Print View

Question:

Why can't you roll the bag to obtain the pressure? No, I don't have one of these new nifty toys, but am interested.

People are not liking the squeeze funciont. I would think rolling would be easier and create more pressure forcing the water through faster.

At least rolling is always faster when deflating rubber rafts and air mattreses.

M B
(livingontheroad) - M
squeeze on 10/21/2011 16:42:50 MDT Print View

Platys will work fine with it, and are more durable.

They need to include a quality "tornado tube" type (male-to-male) adapter for connecting to water bottles on the outlet end though, and beef up the bags a bit. the tornado tubes you can buy are poorly made and brittle.

By letting you connect a clean platy on the outlet, you can backflush by squeezing too, and dont need a syringe.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Platys on a Sawyer squeeze on 10/21/2011 16:48:38 MDT Print View

I tried a Platy and the threads didn't match. I could get it started, but it felt like it would strip and definitely wouldn't thread down far enough to seat and seal. What model did you use?

Edit: I was going back and forth on this and did an actual test of a Platy on the Sawyer and it leaks. I made another post with a photo of the two bottle threads and found that the Sawyer is a finer pitch. I would fear that forcing it could eventually damage the threads on the filter housing and I don't recommend it. The leak does trickle down the side of the filter and would drop dirty water straight into any container below.

Another poster mentioned using an o-ring rather than the flat washer supplied with the filter. That may allow it to seal, but I would be careful. Some of the Platy bladders I have actually started to thread on an angle, and all my mechanical experience says it is just the wrong fit. I did note differences in the thickness of the threads on several Platy products, but the pitch (the angle and spacing of the threads) is the same between them. The exit nozzle/end cap threads easily on both Sawyer and Platy bags and mislead me as well.

Edited by dwambaugh on 10/22/2011 07:51:21 MDT.

Stephen Barber
(grampa) - MLife

Locale: SoCal
Rolling on 10/21/2011 16:59:34 MDT Print View

Rolling is exactly what I did, and probably contributed to the problem.

Explanation: I'm about 60 and have tremors familiar (sp?), which means my hands shake more and more as I get older. Trying to squeeze the Sawyer bag while aiming at the mouth of a Platypus left half the filtered water on the ground. So I used my left hand to hold the Sawyer filter and Platypus mouths in alignment, and squeezed with my right hand. After the initial squeeze, I rolled the top (bottom?) of the bag down (like on their cutsey advertising video), wrapped my thumb around the rolled section and my fingers on either side of the throat and squeezed. Rolled some more and squeezed. In three days, the Sawyer bag was leaking.

My guess is (Sawyer would not confirm this in correspondence with them) that by squeezing the bag on either side of the throat I created creases in the plastic of the bag, which (1) led to the leak developing and (2) Sawyer took as evidence of "wringing".

So if you roll the bag, do be careful of how you squeeze it - Do not use any force on the bag next to the throat which causes the bag to fold there. You will create a leak and have Sawyer accuse you of wringing!

I'd like to see Sawyer develop a more pliable bag, or at least do a (serious) video on how to squeeze the bag one-handed while aligning the filter opening with a narrow bottle opening. Again, Sawyer did not comment on this request.

Again, I still like the system, and appreciate Sawyer replacing my bag (I also bought some extras from them - though the suggestion of using Platypus bags sounds good!) despite their verdict of unauthorized wringing.

The tornado tube is a great idea!

Edited by grampa on 10/21/2011 17:05:04 MDT.

Ike Mouser
(isaac.mouser) - F
Chemicals? on 10/21/2011 17:46:55 MDT Print View

Are u all using chems in addition to this, im hiking 75 miles of the AT in novmber and dont really want to wait for the chems. I normally use bleach and wait 30 min.

John Smith
(CSNeoM4A1) - F
Well on 10/21/2011 18:13:06 MDT Print View

I don't plan on using any chems with this. But a drop or two of bleach would not hurt anything.

Has anyone found a usable (not brittle) tornado tube? I found some on amazon but have yet to buy one.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Chemicals? on 10/21/2011 18:30:06 MDT Print View

I don't use chemicals with the filter, but I carry MicroPur tablets for backup. In North America a 0.1 micron filter will get the usual parasites and bacteria. In other areas you may need to deal with viruses like polio and hepatitis and the chemicals are a good choice there. Ben has a lot of info on using bleach.

I like the filter as I can carry less water and not have the time issues. There is usually too much water where I hike. I have used a Steripen in the same way, but I prefer actually removing the bugs than just zapping them; also, there are no batteries to fuss with, and no issues with containers. The weight between the Sawyer and a Steripen is a wash if I remember right, maybe less when considering spare batteries or heavier containers with a wide mouth. It is still a mechanical device, so I carry the chemicals for backup. I've used a pump filter like a Katadyn Hiker Pro for group/family trips, but I think it's too heavy for solo use. The Sawyer has better filtration specs too.

Jim Fitzgerald
(jimfitz12000) - M

Locale: Southern California
Sawyer/Frontier Pro on 10/21/2011 18:32:55 MDT Print View

I recently spoke with an Aquamira customer service rep re my Frontier Pro filter, which they immediately and willingly replaced. For whatever reason, my Frontier Pro, which I used in gravity flow set up for less than a week, became clogged and impeded flow.

The Aquamira rep told me they would soon release a filter system with their "squeeze" bags. Rep said bags will not be Platys, but from a contract manufacturer. Maybe the yet to be released Aquamira bags will withstand “wringing” and be a worthy alternative to Sawyer?

Andy F
(AndyF) - M

Locale: Midwest/Midatlantic
Re: Chemicals? on 10/21/2011 18:52:17 MDT Print View

My experience and approach match Dale's, except I haven't used a Steripen. I like that I don't have to add chemicals to great-tasting water.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Sawyer/Frontier Pro on 10/21/2011 19:01:30 MDT Print View

Good question.

Did the rep mention new filters with smaller pores?

Stephen Barber
(grampa) - MLife

Locale: SoCal
No Chemicals on 10/21/2011 19:12:55 MDT Print View

Like Dale, I've used the Steripen with good success. I cut the top off a Nalgene "canteen" and zapped the bugs in it, then poured into a lightweight container (Platypus or Aquamira bottle. I may go back to it if I can't find a good way to deal with the fragile Sawyer bag thing.

For decades, I used to use iodine exclusively. Nasty taste! I'd rather not do chemicals now that there are so many other good alternatives.

Now I use a Frontier "suck thru" filter as back-up.

Hoot Filsinger
(filsinger) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: squeeze on 10/21/2011 19:27:01 MDT Print View

I replaced the hose washer with the same diameter thin black neoprene washers and platys and other bottles seal nicely.

Paul Osborn
(bcoutdoors) - F
passed on the feedback on 10/21/2011 20:09:54 MDT Print View

Hi all,

I'm not connected to sawyer, but I did pass on your feedback to one of their reps. It'll be interesting to see their response.

John Smith
(CSNeoM4A1) - F
So... on 10/21/2011 20:13:08 MDT Print View

I guess my current plan is to use a 2L platy for the dirty water bag and get a tornado tube or some equivalent so I can also use a 2L platy or standard bottle for the clean water.

I am still wondering how long a hose would be needed to make this filter work as a gravity filter? Basically how much head pressure is required to force water through it.

Kristin Fiebelkorn
(kushbaby) - MLife

Locale: South Texas
Don't need a tornado tube, just two caps with holes... on 10/21/2011 20:56:31 MDT Print View

I have a Sawyer Squeeze, and am pretty happy with it. The bags *feel* more fragile than the Platys, so I just plan to use a Platy as a dirty bag when the Sawyer bags give out. Meanwhile, no need for anything fancy like a tornado tube. I took one look at the squirt cap and decided that that was a recipe for a big pain in the tuckus. So, I took two extra Platypus closure caps, made a hole in each of them about 1/2" in diameter, and taped them back to back with waterproof athletic tape (local drugstore brand). Has held together very well so far (a couple of several day trips), and easy to fix (more tape) or replace if it fails. (I even "borrowed" some of the waterproof tape off of the connecter for a hot spot.) It makes it a LOT easier to use. I keep the connector attached to the filter unit and put a baggie over it to keep it from getting contaminated by dirty water (I added a rubber band after the trip where I took this photo, to be extra safe). To fill the dirty bag it's easy - cut a very lightweight cheap water bottle in half, and use the bottom half as a dedicated water scoop. (Don't want to use my mug, then I'd have to disinfect it!)

(EDIT TO ADD: You can't tell in the photo, but I am holding the two bags connected to the filter suspended in the air. The tape held together that well.)

BTW, if you try this, use a smaller drill bit and then enlarge the hole. I tried a bigger bit at first and the caps sort of cracked. Had to start over...)

Here are some pics:Sawyer connector 2Sawyer connector 1Sawyer kit setup

Edited by kushbaby on 10/21/2011 20:58:42 MDT.

Stephen Barber
(grampa) - MLife

Locale: SoCal
Caps and Tape!!! on 10/21/2011 21:05:05 MDT Print View

Nice set up, Kristin!

Kristin Fiebelkorn
(kushbaby) - MLife

Locale: South Texas
Re: Caps and Tape!!! on 10/21/2011 21:11:02 MDT Print View

> Nice set up, Kristin!

Thanks - it makes it REALLY easy. I just stand or sit comfortably, hold the dirty bag up with one hand, and squeeze. Gravity does a wee bit of work, but you do have to squeeze unless you want to be there all day (I'm impatient - I don't use chemicals, though I carry Micropur as backup - I drink right away). No leaks yet for me, but I was instinctively careful around the collar (though it may just be a matter of time).

Heavily waterproof-taped double cap connector plus little baggie weighs 8 grams on my scale...

Ike Mouser
(isaac.mouser) - F
Im next on 10/21/2011 23:12:36 MDT Print View

Im gonna get this setup but im not fooling with sawyer bags, why not just use platys fform the beginning? If you bust a bag, thats extra weight you gotta pack out. I have older platys from a few years ago, hope they work.

John Smith
(CSNeoM4A1) - F
Platys on 10/22/2011 07:08:40 MDT Print View

So stay away from the soft bottle platypus bags and get the traditional ones in order for the threads to match?

M B
(livingontheroad) - M
connector on 10/22/2011 07:34:27 MDT Print View

for filling a clean bottle, I have no doubt the two caps taped together works good.

Have you attempted to backflush it that way? Thats where I would be concerned about it coming apart or leaking.

My first consideration was to make my own connector like that, by welding or gluing the PE caps together and drilling out. But when you can buy the tornado tube for $3, there was no point. Have to trim the tornado tube shorter, ~3/16" from each end though or it hits filter neck before seals up. I just held mine against side of a grinding wheel for a few seconds and done.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Platys on 10/22/2011 07:38:32 MDT Print View

I was wrong! I had hand tightened a Platypus Hoser to the Sawyer and it felt like it was sealing, but after comparing the threads of the Hoser with the Sawyer bag, I did a real-world test and it leaks. Of course the leak runs right down the side of the filter and would drop dirty water straight into any container below. Testing several Platy bags that I have, most bottomed out with the Platy neck at a noticeable angle in the filter housing-- NOT good! From what I can see, the Sawyer filter and Platypus bags are NOT compatible. I think repeated use would eventually damage the threads on the filter and I don't recommend using the Platypus products on the dirty water end, even if you can get a good seal. It's too bad, as that would really extend the options with the Sawyer.

As you can see from the photo, the Sawyer threads are closer together, a finer pitch thread.

Sawyer on the left, Platy on the right.

Sawyer and Platypus bag threads compared

Sawyer and Platypus bag threads compared

Edited by dwambaugh on 10/22/2011 08:05:02 MDT.

Ike Mouser
(isaac.mouser) - F
thanks on 10/22/2011 09:37:43 MDT Print View

thats good to know about the bags. my main reason for buying this filter wouldbe speed. i currently wait for chems/(hike carrying a few extra pounds for 30 min). If im forced to use those bags, i think i'll stay with what i got: Homemade carbon filter + bleach.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: thanks on 10/22/2011 09:47:53 MDT Print View

The speed and weight were my rationale for buying it. It is close to a Steripen for weight and free of the battery issues, but still prone to mechanical issues like the bag breaking or the filter clogging. I can't imagine someone not wanting to roll the bag as it empties. Looks like we should avoid hard crumpling of the bag.

Kristin Fiebelkorn
(kushbaby) - MLife

Locale: South Texas
Re: connector on 10/22/2011 10:17:07 MDT Print View

@Martin:

I did not intentionally attempt backflush in the field, but I managed to *unintentionally* backflush quite a bit by being a klutz - ended up squirting quite a bit of water back into the Sawyer bag. I have since backflushed it at home with a clean 1L Platy to prepare for storage. There's a little bit of water that comes under the edge of the cap (where it meets the filter) when backflushing under pressure (as hard as I could squeeze), but not much (most of the water goes through), and no leakage between the taped caps.

I should point out that while this has turned out to be pretty robust so far, I didn't just assume it would be fail-proof. I also carry one 1L Platy fitted with the squirt top that came with the Sawyer system (that I use for handwashing, etc.), so that if the connector failed in the field, I could use that squirt top on the filter to get water into a clean Platypus if needed. I looked at this as a convenience thing because the squirting was irritating - I was surprised it held up so well!

I came up with this idea the night before a trip, so there was no time to get a tornado tube (though I had read about them here), but it certainly makes sense to try that. Also, it sounds like you have more skills and tools than I do...

Kristin Fiebelkorn
(kushbaby) - MLife

Locale: South Texas
Bummer!!! on 10/22/2011 10:23:05 MDT Print View

@Dale: Thanks for testing that - that's a real drag that the Platypus bags don't work on the dirty end. I wish Sawyer would develop a stronger bag, or more compatible threads...

Andy F
(AndyF) - M

Locale: Midwest/Midatlantic
Platys on 10/22/2011 19:32:08 MDT Print View

I tested using a Platypus 2.5 liter as the dirty water bag, and I did not observe any leaks, despite rolling and squeezing very hard. Also, if I put the Sawyer bag lid on the Platy and squeeze very hard, no air escapes. Some possible reasons my results differ from Dale's:

1. My Platy has a slightly courser thread pitch (spacing) than the Sawyer bag, but the threads themselves do not appear to be as thick as the ones in Dale's photos. My Platy was purchased in spring, 2010. It's possible that Dale has an older or newer Platy, and the threads changed slightly at some point.

2. My filter has a white washer inside, and I tightened the Platy very snug against it. Maybe the washer is something Sawyer added or changed? Maybe Dale didn't have the Platy as tight?

3. Dale wrings his Platys just like Stephen wrings his Sawyer bags. ;)

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Platys on 10/22/2011 20:13:24 MDT Print View

"My Platy was purchased in spring, 2010. It's possible that Dale has an older or newer Platy, and the threads changed slightly at some point."

And/or Sawyer has some variations in tolerances too, just to make this all fun.

I tried several Platys, one that is a couple weeks old to me, but who knows how long it was on the shelf. The rest are from a span of years. All are pretty much the same threads except that 34oz Platy "SoftBottle" that has thinner threads (and still doesn't work).

My filter has a white washer too. Looks just like a garden hose washer. It makes me feel very special.

I'm pretty good mechanically-- automobiles, cars, bikes, boats, appliances and plumbing, and when I tighten a Platy into the filter, it seats at a distinct angle and does not feel right when it starts to tighten down. Every mechanic fiber in my being says "STOP, IT WILL STRIP."

Like many things, you could make it work, but I think it would get damaged with use, and when you let all the "use" out, it becomes "useless." :)

The Platy on a Sawyer, note the "unnatural" angle:
Platy on a Sawyer

the Sawyer bag on the Sawyer filter and all right with the world:
Sawyer bag on Sawyer filter

Hoot Filsinger
(filsinger) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter on 10/22/2011 20:36:36 MDT Print View

Hey Dale,

The fix is a neoprene washer as stated above. It will allow your Platy threads to seat deeper into the female Sawyer threads and it will grab the Platy threads with no leaks. Cost = 39 cents.

Andy F
(AndyF) - M

Locale: Midwest/Midatlantic
Re: Platys on 10/22/2011 20:36:38 MDT Print View

The Platy I have screws straight on to my filter. I don't sense any tendency for it to go on at an angle at all. It's this one:

http://cascadedesigns.com/platypus/water-bottles/platy-bottle/product

Mine isn't as transparent as the photo on that page--just appears to be a standard Platy.

I guess the important point of all of this is that if it's going to leak, it will be pretty obvious beforehand. :)

Edited by AndyF on 10/22/2011 20:39:00 MDT.

Kristin Fiebelkorn
(kushbaby) - MLife

Locale: South Texas
Mine's crooked, too... on 10/22/2011 22:49:24 MDT Print View

OK, so I had to try this. Put a recently purchased 2L Platy (what I had intended to use as a dirty bag if the Sawyer bag gave out) on the dirty end of the filter. Not as crooked as Dale's, but still crooked, and leaks after a little while.

Guess I'll be babying the Sawyer bags, and maybe ordering some replacements just in case...

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter on 10/23/2011 00:45:10 MDT Print View

Bill wrote, "Hey Dale,

The fix is a neoprene washer as stated above. It will allow your Platy threads to seat deeper into the female Sawyer threads and it will grab the Platy threads with no leaks. Cost = 39 cents."

I tried it with no washer with the same off-center result. With the items I have on hand, the washer won't be an effective cure in my opinion. I suspect there are a couple variations on threads with the filters and perhaps the Platypus bags and/or I have the wrong side of the bell curve on manufacturing. I really do think that I would eventually damage the filter threads if I continued to use the Platypus bags. Thanks for the tip though!

The filter works as advertised with the Sawyer bags. Of course I assumed that I could hook up a Platypus when I felt like it and I had a gravity option in mind too. For now I don't see that as an option and I can't fault Sawyer for that.

A proper fitting hose nipple would be a great accessory for Sawyer to sell and would allow all kinds of adaptations from there. I have to see what the hardware store has to offer.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Re: Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter on 10/24/2011 14:12:08 MDT Print View

Update:

I went to the hardware store and found that the threads are very close to a standard US 3/4" garden hose fittings. I found a couple plastic fittings with 3/4" male garden hose threads and barbed hose fitting on the other end, but the barbed end was too big for use with typical hydration hoses. I'm fairly confident that you could find ones with smaller barbed fittings or something like a 3/4" male hose to 3/8" female pipe bushing, and that would allow using available pipe-to-barbed fittings that come in just about every size imaginable.

But....the 3/4" hose threads still aren't a perfect match, as I tried some metal fittings and they were going to strip and I could see that they were doing some damage to the filter threads. These aren't high precision fittings, so it is a real turkey shoot to see what will fit and it still needs some testing under real-world conditions.

My take is that the Sawyer threads are proprietary and it is best just to stick with their bags. If you want to use a hose-and-bladder arrangement, the Sawyer filters that come with hose nipples are available.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Don't need a tornado tube, just two caps with holes... on 10/26/2011 01:53:13 MDT Print View

Indeed.

I tested the cap from standard 1.25 L pop bottle. The thread seems to match the Sawyer perfectly.

So I took two flexible caps, drilled 6 mm holes in the middle of each one, and crimped a 6 mm eyelet through them (with washer). Worked perfectly to connect the **output** of the Sawyer squeeze filter to a pop bottle.

Add a small bit of duct tape doubled over to one bottom corner of the sawyer bag and punch a hole in the duct tape. Add string to suspend the whole system from anything. Fill Sawyer bag, connect to filter inlet, connect filter output to pop bottle, hang up. Walk away and let it filter.

This has some potential...

Cheers

Raymond Estrella
(rayestrella) - MLife

Locale: Northern Minnesota
Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter for multi-use on 10/26/2011 05:10:16 MDT Print View

I took mine out last weekend and was thinking of ways to use it for multiple people too, and then a friend asked how she could use one to support 3.

So night before last I hacked out a couple ways to use the Sawyer Squeeze as a multi-person, platy-filling filter system.

Squeeze

The top one I pull the nozzle off and slide a tube onto the outlet barb that is exposed. The other end has a Platy adapter. This lets a bottle stand a little easier. (I can use a longer tube too.)

The bottom one (like you and others I see) is two Platy caps that I roughed up with some emery cloth on the faces and then glued together with silicone caulk. I drilled a 3/8" hole through the center of both caps. This just lets the Sawyer attach directly to a Platy of any type.

I will try it out this weekend.

Like you Roger, I was thinking about a gravity application as that has become my favorite these days. For a single user I suppose the 2L bag is enough but I want to figure a way to use something A; bigger capacity, and B; easier to fill.

Donna C
(leadfoot) - M

Locale: Middle Virginia
Re: Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter for multi-use on 10/26/2011 10:06:50 MDT Print View

I have the gravity Sawyer system with the Platy Big zip and thought of converting to this..however....while in the Sawyer website I enlarged the image and noticed the bag said if the filter freezes, discard because it's no good. So...is this true of all the Sawyer filters? And has anyone experienced this with theirs? And why would freezing the filter render it no good? Do they mean even after thawing?

BER ---
(BER) - MLife

Locale: Wisconsin
hollow fiber membrane on 10/26/2011 10:51:38 MDT Print View

Donna said:
"I have the gravity Sawyer system with the Platy Big zip and thought of converting to this..however....while in the Sawyer website I enlarged the image and noticed the bag said if the filter freezes, discard because it's no good. So...is this true of all the Sawyer filters? And has anyone experienced this with theirs? And why would freezing the filter render it no good? Do they mean even after thawing?"

Donna, I believe the issue is with the expansion of freezing water rupturing the hollow fibers. My understanding (or at least the way I visualize it--which may be wrong) is that these filters have thin tubes that in turn have a uniform pore size along their walls that actually does the filtering. Expand the water by freezing, and the tubes break, allowing water to leak from the broken fibers rather than being forced to filter through the pores.

FWIW, the MSR and Playpus filters that use HFMs also have the same warning. The problem is, is that you would probably not know the filter was damaged as larger particulate matter might still be filtered while the microscopic germs would not...that is, until you get sick.

Edited by BER on 10/26/2011 10:56:34 MDT.

Stephen Barber
(grampa) - MLife

Locale: SoCal
Water expands when it freezes... on 10/26/2011 10:51:57 MDT Print View

...bursting all the little 0.1 filter fibers. Then all the badies come right through it!

Raymond Estrella
(rayestrella) - MLife

Locale: Northern Minnesota
freezing on 10/26/2011 11:03:28 MDT Print View

Yeah, Brian is right.

Think of a drinking straw made of hard plastic with a bunch of holes poked in it that are sewing pin sized. Those holes are the 0.1 filter holes. If the straw freezes it breaks and lets things larger than 0.1 get into the straw and out to your receptacle.

I had to sleep with my Squeeze last weekend and plan to this week too.

Donna C
(leadfoot) - M

Locale: Middle Virginia
Re: freezing on 10/26/2011 13:20:28 MDT Print View

It seems like there would be no way to know if it froze unless you put a small water bottle with you in your bag/quilt and the filter. If the water froze, then perhaps the filter did as well.

BER ---
(BER) - MLife

Locale: Wisconsin
prefilter for Sawyer Squeeze? on 10/26/2011 14:01:21 MDT Print View

I'm just curious if anyone uses a prefilter (such as a disk from a gold mesh coffee filter ala this thread ) to keep larger sediment out of the filter? Perhaps putting the disk under the washer inside the inflow of the filter?

I've been thinking on the way I manage water filtration, and finally got around to getting this system. It should cut a significant amount of weight compared to the MSR Aultoflow gravity system I'd previously been using.

Edited by BER on 10/26/2011 14:11:20 MDT.

Raymond Estrella
(rayestrella) - MLife

Locale: Northern Minnesota
Re: freezing on 10/26/2011 14:10:25 MDT Print View

Donna, I stop taking filters that I have to worry about once the daytime temps drop below freezing. Right now we are getting into the 20's and 30's (F) for lows but the days are still up near 50, so I just bring it in with me at night. Once it gets too cold to carry I won't be able to get water safely anyways as our lakes will be frozen over.

KEN LARSON
(KENLARSON) - MLife

Locale: Western Michigan
prefilter for Sawyer Squeeze? on 10/26/2011 14:37:58 MDT Print View

Brian.....To answer your question, yes. The Gold Tone Coffee Filter mesh is 3 microns in size. I used a modified Gold Tone Coffee Filter every time to took water from the inland lakes on Isle Royale to remove any possibility of infection from the hydatid tapeworms eggs (Echinococcus granulosus egg rounded, diameter 25 - 40 µ in diameter) that lurk in the water.

Edited by KENLARSON on 10/26/2011 14:41:22 MDT.

Larry De La Briandais
(Hitech) - F

Locale: SF Bay Area
Prefilters on 10/26/2011 14:48:31 MDT Print View

If you are using clear stream water you generally won't need a prefilter. I used a sawyer filter (the version with the hose barbs) to filter at least 10 gallons over labor day (multiple people using it) and the flow never slowed. I was using water from a snow fed stream in the Sierras that does have silt in it (that's why I filter it). When using a First Need filter with an MSR prefilter the prefilter would fill with enough silt to require cleaning (or replacement of the element) after at best 5 gallons, often less, when filtering water from the same stream. Since the only thing you need to do with the sawyer is a quick back-flush, I've decided not to use a prefilter.

Edited by Hitech on 10/26/2011 14:53:50 MDT.

Tony Wong
(Valshar) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: Re: freezing on 10/26/2011 16:57:41 MDT Print View

Donna,

You can minimize the chances of freezing by sucking the filter dry when you are done.

While hiking, this makes the "wet" filter light as possible and leaves little water in the filter at night to freeze.

That said, I do make a point of sleeping with my filter in my bivy, under a pile of extra clothing, or with me under my quilt if it is really cold.

I have been using the old black Sawyer inline filter for about 3-4 years now and mine is going strong...should last forever, unless I crack the case, break off one of the input or output nipples, or allow it to freeze.

If in doubt, sleep with the filter after sucking it dry, and you should be fine.

-Tony

Stephen Barber
(grampa) - MLife

Locale: SoCal
Drying the filter on 10/26/2011 19:48:31 MDT Print View

Just to be clear, suck the water out from the clean end!

If you carry the back-flushing hypo, you could use that instead - just push air through the filter.

And a tip I got here:

Once you're home, and have pushed bleach-laden water into the filter for 20 minutes to kill any lingering bacteria, take a fish tank air pump, and use it to push air through the filter for a day or two to dry the filter out for storage.

Donna C
(leadfoot) - M

Locale: Middle Virginia
Re: Drying the filter on 10/27/2011 03:43:00 MDT Print View

All good to know. I am new to the gravity filter thing..used Steripen...and found that I will fill my bottles for the next day's breakfast and hiking and then disconnect the filter. I am thinking of using a bag now like the old Amigo to increase the flow. Just a guess but I think with the zip top closed, it hampers the flow. Or I may rig something to hang it using something other than what's provided.

drowning in spam
(leaftye) - F

Locale: SoCal
Re: Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter on 10/27/2011 21:20:29 MDT Print View

I just carried mine on a 3 day hike. I filtered about 8 liters. I was very happy with its speed, especially when I was able to fill up and drink a full 1 liter bag while standing in the middle of the creek without feeling like the filter was slowing my drinking. One nice unexpected perk was that I could refill the bottles in the side pockets of my pack while leaving the bottles in the pockets. The only thing that I didn't like was that the washer would deform and leak if the dirty bag was screwed into the filter too tightly, but that wasn't a big deal and it was very easy to fix. I like this filter enough so far that I might never use Aqua Mira or my bigger gravity filter again.

Paul Smart
(Smarteee) - M
Cloudy Water on 11/27/2011 04:07:18 MST Print View

Used my brand new Sawyer Squeeze the first time on an over night hike in the Royal National Park, Sydney, Australia this weekend. I've been using an in-line filter with a Camel back & a Steripen up until recently. We've had a lot of rain here lately and the river run off, everywhere, was quite murky. I filtered 1.5 Litres, of the cleanest surface water I could find, through the Saywer & directly into my 'Clean' 2L Platypus. The resulting water, although not appearing to contain any particles, was far from clear. More a subtle Yellow/White wine colour. I wasn't 100% confident so I followed up the filtering by popping in a couple of Steri-Tablets into the Platypus and leaving it for 30 mins in direct sunlight.

Filling up any of the supplied pre-filter pouch's in standing lake water is, to be brutally honest, a pain. This is due mainly to the fact that when you place the pouch underwater to fill through the 1 inch wide opening, the water pressure outside keeps it collapsed. You need to slowly move the pouch around (Stirring up sediment) while trying to keep the sides pushed in to maintain an opening the water can fall into. It takes considerably longer to fill the pre-filter pouch than to filter the water you've collected! (Not to mention all the leeches that attacked me while I messed around...). You could argue that I should carry a different pre-filter 'dirty' bottle, but then that kinda negates the main two selling points of this filter. Size & Weight.

In summary, and reality, it took around 45 Minutes to get 1.5 Litres of water that I was comfortable to drink. (Hopefully I wont be writing an update in a couple of days, from a Hospital!). I will admit however, that the time it takes to fill would no doubt differ if I was filling from a fast running stream/creek/waterfall. I'll use it a few more times and my opinion may well change. But for now....

....Yes, it's light. No, it's not hassle free.

Mark Champion
(CelticElf) - F
camelbak pump on 05/15/2012 12:37:35 MDT Print View

Sawyer has adapters for the squeeze filter for hoses. I just purchased a camelbak pump so I can place this filter as an inline system. I have called Sawyer and the filters can withstand up to 40 psi. I am making a big assumption that the camelbak pump will not exceed the 40 psi. With this set up I can pump the water directly into my water blader using the quick disconnect.

Currently I am saving up to purchase the .02 purifier and adapt that to this set up.

Randy Martin
(randalmartin) - F

Locale: Colorado
Re: Cloudy Water on 05/15/2012 12:57:48 MDT Print View

"Filling up any of the supplied pre-filter pouch's in standing lake water is, to be brutally honest, a pain. This is due mainly to the fact that when you place the pouch underwater to fill through the 1 inch wide opening, the water pressure outside keeps it collapsed. You need to slowly move the pouch around (Stirring up sediment) while trying to keep the sides pushed in to maintain an opening the water can fall into. It takes considerably longer to fill the pre-filter pouch than to filter the water you've collected!"

I can understand that filling up the collapsible pouch in standing water is going to be more difficult than running water. I would suggest for ease of filling to use a one liter water bottle with the top cutoff to scoop the water then you can easily pour into the squeeze pouch. I use the same 1 liter bottle with top removed to scoop water for my Steripen and I would think that same approach would overcome the difficulties you mentioned.

Daniel Cox
(COHiker) - F

Locale: San Isabel NF
Re: Drying the filter on 05/15/2012 14:06:22 MDT Print View

After 2 months inside I accidentally subjected my gear tote to sub-freezing temps in my garage. I emailed Sawyer about potential harm done, and was told that you can't *ever* get the filter totally dry in a room-type environment. Even with long term storage in low humidity climate micro-droplets of water still exist and must be replaced.

I realize that of course that's what the rep is required to say. My knowledge of water properties isn't in-depth enough to say how probable the above is. I feel like sitting in a tote in my office, on the low humidity high plains of Southern Colorado would dry it enough to prevent damage but nonetheless that's the official line from the company.

I've kept my 3-way, but it still weighs on my mind a bit as the summer 'packing season ramps up and I filter water from those beaver ponds and green-water lakes.

Rusty Beaver
(rustyb) - F

Locale: Rocky Mountains
Re: Re: Drying the filter on 05/15/2012 15:27:44 MDT Print View

"I emailed Sawyer about potential harm done, and was told that you can't *ever* get the filter totally dry in a room-type environment. Even with long term storage in low humidity climate micro-droplets of water still exist and must be replaced.
I realize that of course that's what the rep is required to say. My knowledge of water properties isn't in-depth enough to say how probable the above is".

I can't speak for Sawyer products but, much to my surprise, I found some moisture inside a Katatdyn Hiker cartridge after more than a year! I wouldn't have believed this myself but out of curiosity, found it after cutting a clogged filter in half to see what it looked like inside.

Stephen Barber
(grampa) - MLife

Locale: SoCal
re: Re: Re: Drying the filter on 05/15/2012 15:50:21 MDT Print View

Guess I'll run my aquarium pump a little longer!

The way I set it up, all the air from the pump is going through the filter. At the end of the summer last year, I plugged in the pump, and then forgot about it for over a week. I can't imagine there would be a lot of moisture left after that!

Daniel Cox
(COHiker) - F

Locale: San Isabel NF
Re: Re: Re: Drying the filter on 05/15/2012 16:35:45 MDT Print View

"I found moisture inside a Katadyn Hiker cartridge after more than a year!"

Ah, crap. I might need to budget for a new filter then.

Nico .
(NickB) - MLife

Locale: Los Padres National Forest
Sawyer Squeeze on 05/15/2012 18:56:49 MDT Print View

I've been using the Sawyer Squeeze filter for all 5 of my trips in the last 5 months. So far, I've been pleased with its performance, ease of use and adaptability. It's a simple, lightweight water filtration system.

Early on I swapped out the factory supplied squeeze bags with an old 2L platypus. Haven't had any trouble with a leaky seal which differs from some other reports earlier in the thread.

On the clean end of the filter, I've mostly stuck with using the factory supplied push/pull cap but have also, on one trip, instead used a modified tornado tube to connect the clean end of the filter to another 2L platypus. This worked great as well and I couldn't see any evidence of leaks from a bad seal.

Most of the time I've used the filter in squeeze mode or an inline mode, but with the tornado tube and clean 2L platy, I set it up in gravity mode: 2L dirty platy hanging from a tree> squeeze filter > tornado tube > 2L clean platy. Without any user input, the squeeze filter appeared to filter at a comparable rate to the standard 3-way Sawyer filter (about 2.5- 3 mins/liter). A nice option for camp while going about other duties.

For a water scoop, I cut down an old platy. Makes it easy to get water out of the creek and pour into the dirty platy. Adds all of an ounce, if that, to my water filtration system. I wrap my dirty platy and water scoop up around the filter and rubber band it together. I leave the protective cap on the push/pull cap on the clean end to protect it from contamination when not in use.

Out of the 5 short trips I've used it on, I've only backflushed and cleaned it with a bleach solution once, although I always rinse and shake it out real good and do my best to dry it out before storing it away. Haven't noticed any changes in performance yet. I don't have to contend with freezing temps for long term storage, but when camping I try to shake out any water and then stuff it in whatever is handy (ziploc, stuff sack, etc.) and throw it in the bottom of my quilt.

All in all, I find the Sawyer Sqeeze to be an improvement over my most recent past methods of water treatment (which was the 3 in 1 Sawyer filter used in a gravity set-up), primarily due to the savings in weight, flexibilty of ways to use it and simplification of set-up. I've played around with a Steri-Pen Adventurer Opti as well in the last year or so, and it too was easy to use, but I'm finding the Squeeze filter is just a better fit for me. I like knowing the water is passing through a filter as opposed to zapping it with a UV lamp that may, or may not, be working properly. Plus the Sawyer Sqeeze benefits from no batteries to contend with, about the same size/weight as the SteriPen and it's better for filtering larger amounts of water (1.5 L+) at one time. I think I've found my winner.

David Williams
(dwayve) - F

Locale: South Bay Area
re: freezing the filter on 06/24/2012 16:44:59 MDT Print View

Forgot to take it in the sleeping bag with me - wonder if it's compromised?
There was a light dusting of snow but the filter was in a plastic bag:Sawyer filter in plastic bag on left
It wasn't a hard freeze, more like windblown snow at 11,000ft, none found on top of bag.

Steven Paris
(saparisor) - M

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Sawyer Squeeze Water Filter on 07/27/2012 23:13:08 MDT Print View

I just returned from a short trip in Olympic NP and used the Sawyer Squeeze for the first time. I took only the 32oz Sawyer bag (and an older-style 1L Platypus in case the Sawyer started to leak).

I've read that a lot of people here are using it as a gravity filter, but I squeezed it and had a water system with 3 simple parts: the filter itself, a "scoop" made from the lower half of an old Nalgene cantene bladder and two Smartwater 700mL bottles.

I used the scoop to gather water and pour it into the Sawyer bladder (much easier than trying to submerge and get water into a bladder), I screwed the filter on and turned it upside down with the push/pull spout of the filter inserted into a Smartwater bottle opening (a perfect fit). Within a few minutes I had both bottles filled. No tubes needed and I didn't have to filter crouched beside a river trying to keep all the various parts in the right place while pumping. For the last year, I've been using Aqua Mira, but I like this better.

Keep in mind that much of the running water in Olympic is crystal-clear so no pre-filtering was needed.

Andrew Priest
(Aushiker1) - M

Locale: Fremantle
Sawyer Customer Service on 09/26/2012 08:25:48 MDT Print View

I have recently used a Sawyer Squeeze water filter and had one start leaking at the seam where it is glued to the outlet. I contacted Sawyer about this and this is the response I received from Susan Glick:

Sawyer filters offer the highest level of filtration available,
therefore they are removing more seen and unseen particulates than you
are used to filtering. Even water that looks sparkling clear can
actually be loaded with very fine particulate - which is what makes the
water sparkle.
Depending on the quality of the water you may need to clean the filter
more often and we have supplied this lightweight syringe to make field
cleaning simple.
Before the pouches leave the factory they are 100% air tested, and while
they are rugged, these low cost pouches are not indestructible. They
tear as a result of too much pressure being applied and this happens
when you try to force water through the filter too fast, or your filter
needs cleaning and is creating more resistance.
To avoid breaking your pouch:
1. Do not squeeze the pouch as hard or wring the pouch.
2. Backwash the filter more often and with more force. You should bring
the syringe with you on your trip, especially if you are on a multi day
trip. It is important that the first backwash is strong so that it
cleans out all of the fibers rather than creating paths of least
resistance. The filter and syringe together weigh 4 oz which is still
much lighter and more compact than other filters.
3. Don't over tighten the filter on the pouch. Over tightening can
cause the o-rings to embed into the threads or lodge into the opening of
the pouch. If the o-ring is out of place you may not a have a tight
seal and water could leak out the bottom of the filter.
With all new technology, it takes time to learn how to best use it.
Until you learn the perfect balance of force and cleaning, we recommend
bringing a backup pouch with you on your trip.
Spare pouches come in packs of 3 and are available through www.REI.com
or www.Amazon.com.

My email to Sawyer was:

Dear Sawyer

I purchased a Sawyer Squeeze Water Filtration system from Moontrail.com in
January 2012. On a recent bicycle tour here in Western Australia I took the
2 litre bag and filter with me. Unfortunately after about three uses of
the 2 litre bag it started leaking near the output making the bag unusable
It seems that the bag itself has become unglued from the output unit. I
understand that others have reported similar issues which is disappointing
given that one needs this sort of gear to be reliable.

Can you please advise what can be done to address this issue with my faulty
2 litre bag.

Lesson learnt: Never trust Sawyer Products. Very disappointed as I thought this was a cool idea and good solution for me.

Regards
Andrew

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: Sawyer Customer Service on 09/26/2012 08:40:27 MDT Print View

At least you got an email back. mine was never answered.

Evernew bottles will be my choice from now on, with the 16 or 64oz sawyer bag as backup (my 32oz leaked in <2 weeks) depending if i am alone or not.

love the filter, will not buy their bags though.

KEN LARSON
(KENLARSON) - MLife

Locale: Western Michigan
Can We Put a "WRAP" ON THIS ISSUE.... on 09/26/2012 09:53:37 MDT Print View

My wife and I took four of our grand children (The girls ranged in age from 9, 11, 13, 13. ) on a ten day bp adventure this summer to Isle Royal National Park in which they filtered ALL of their water using the SAWYER SQUEEZE FILTER SYSTEM. Previously adventures we had used the SAWYER .02 PURIFER in a gravity mode. This year to get them into the true spirit of the adventure we went to the Squeeze Filter and the wife and I used the SteriPen because of my compromised immune system. Before leaving on the trip I included an EVERNEW WATER BLADDER- 0.6l - (.84oz) as a backup that the girls used maybe twice because they were interested in how it would "work". After I SHOWED/MODELED the correct procedure I wanted them to use and the PRECAUTIONS they must take when "making water" as we would say, there were NO BAG ISSUES as experienced by the many on this thread. I hope this will put at rest this issue.

One key point I emphasized with the girls that has been spoken to prior on this thread …….
• To avoid breaking/leakage around spout of the pouches DO NOT SQUEEZE THE POUCH AS HARD nor WRING/TWIST the pouch!!

Would like to add that worked with the grandchildren:
• Initially squeeze gently the bag in an upright position as the water will flow readily... once or may be twice. Once they found that the water flows from the bag fast with their hand pressure they could proceed to roll/folding as described below.
• GENTLY ROLL/FOLD the BOTTOM of the bag to within 2" aprox. from the spout.

sawyer pouch

• I EMPHAZIED …..DO NOT TRY TO GET EVERY ML OF WATER OUT OF THE BAG!

Cheers

Edited by KENLARSON on 09/26/2012 09:57:40 MDT.

Seth Brewer
(Whistler) - MLife

Locale: www.peaksandvalleys.weebly.com
Not perfect yet...Failure inside of 6 days on 09/26/2012 13:02:43 MDT Print View

Just got back from a 10 day trip of 173 miles from Maine Junction to the Canadian Border on the Vermont Long Trail. I brought both the 1L and 2L Sawyer bags and the filter (ALL NEW AS OF THIS TRIP) and within 6 days had two catastrophic blowouts of both squeeze bags (super glued them -- held for two more days) and ended up on the last day simply using someones Steripen for the last 8 miles till I walked into North Troy. Having used a Steripen Opti for the whole A.T last year without incident, I'm amazed at the utter failure of this unit in so short a time. I would estimate a total use of around 40-50 liters through the filter. AND YES I did bring the syringe with me and backflushed the unit nightly. Will be ending up in the REI Garage sale pile after I return it. A good idea, but not really functional yet IMO.

Jake D
(JakeDatc) - F

Locale: Bristol,RI
Re: Not perfect yet...Failure inside of 6 days on 09/26/2012 13:19:52 MDT Print View

that sucks seth. the problem is with the bags not the filter. filter is awesome. and can be easily fixed with Evernew bags. Steripens have their limitations too.

michael levi
(M.L) - F

Locale: W-Never Eat Soggy (W)affles
Noobies on 09/26/2012 13:54:41 MDT Print View

The bags are fragile, the filter itself is awesome and lightweight.

One of the best combos is bringing two one liter Aquafina water bottles in addition to a Sawyer Squeeze bag.

If your bag fails then the filter will screw directly onto one of your water bottles.

Some people even bring those flexible long smart water bottles and use that to squeeze.

If you would have done 5 minutes of research before you left you would have know this. Then you could have left your Steripen home and saved more weight.

Rakesh Malik
(Tamerlin)

Locale: Cascadia
Re: Noobies on 09/26/2012 14:20:29 MDT Print View

I've been using a Sawyer filter for the past 15 months, and it's been great. I did have to replace the Sawyer pouches, because they're not very durable; I had two start leaking pretty early on. On my last trip (one week), I took a pair of the Evernew pouches, one liter each, and they worked out quite nicely. It was nice having two of them along, because I could fill them from a stream and then set them in the sun to warm up when I wanted a non-freezing sponge bath :)

That said, the filter itself has been fine. I haven't had to backflush it yet, either. I like the Steripen idea, but the fact that it relies on batteries and tends to eat them made me start to mistrust it. It failed on me even with fresh batteries in it, and even though I'd put one in backward when I replaced the batteries, it didn't work when I needed it. I put new batteries in it when I got home, and it worked fine. I stopped using it after that.

Andrew Priest
(Aushiker1) - M

Locale: Fremantle
Squeezing the bag on 09/26/2012 18:08:46 MDT Print View

For what it is worth, I watched the Sawyer video BEFORE I used the filter and I don't believe I squeezed any harder than they show themselves in their video.

I also don't recall any warnings or instructions on squeezing the bags on the website or with the product. Maybe they need to put some serious warnings on the product.

I agree the filter is great but the customer service is shocking and the bags fall short of what I consider to be acceptable quality.

Will probably go with the Evernew bags but for me no more Sawyer Products.

Regards
Andrew

Andrew Priest
(Aushiker1) - M

Locale: Fremantle
Re: Squeezing the bag on 09/26/2012 18:18:45 MDT Print View

I correct myself. Checking my notes on the filter, I see the packaging included a note which states:

While these bags are rugged, they are not indestructible. Sharp objects will puncture the bags, excessive pressure will pop the bag and wringing the bag will cause leaks at the threaded area. There are no warranties on the bags.

So there you go..

Andrew

drowning in spam
(leaftye) - F

Locale: SoCal
Re: Re: Not perfect yet...Failure inside of 6 days on 09/26/2012 18:29:00 MDT Print View

Yeah, I definitely didn't buy it because of the bags. The bags were a bonus. I could care less if they're worthless. Unfortunately it gives the less informed a bad taste about Sawyer.

Nico .
(NickB) - MLife

Locale: Los Padres National Forest
My Sawyer Squeeze bag works fine... on 09/26/2012 18:44:48 MDT Print View

As a water scooper.

I took the smallest one, cut the top off of it and use it to scoop water out of the creek and fill my Evernew bladder (which btw works great with the filter and doesn't leak). Probably takes about 8 scoops to fill the 2L bladder.

My new water scoop is small, light (sub 1 oz), and packs down to almost nothing (just roll it up and put a rubber band around it).

At least this way, I was able to get some beneficial use out of the otherwise worthless Sawyer bags!

Andrew Priest
(Aushiker1) - M

Locale: Fremantle
Re: My Sawyer Squeeze bag works fine... on 09/26/2012 18:46:49 MDT Print View

Great idea. I had been using a cut down PET bottle as a scoop but I like your idea.

Andrew