Forum Index » General Lightweight Backpacking Discussion » breaking the 3 lb barrier- bushcraft style :)


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Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
breaking the 3 lb barrier- bushcraft style :) on 05/16/2011 10:20:46 MDT Print View

something a little different, did a overnighter recently w/ just my bottle holder kit, temps high- 50's, low- freezing- sans any titanium, carbon fiber or cuben :)

my shelter was a AMK heat sheet lean-to affair, pine boughs and then dead grass to sleep on (along w/ a 30" 1/8 GG thinlight pad)- and using a long fire and reflector

not the most comfortable night I've ever spent outdoors, but not really too bad either- would get an hour to hour and half of sleep before I had to mess/add to the fire

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the 3 oz Fiskar saw made short work out of 6" Ponderosa, pleasantly surprised w/ this little saw

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is it morning yet

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in an amazing feat, I was able to reuse the heatsheet (w/ a couple of duct tape mends) and get it back into the original packaging!

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Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: breaking the 3 lb barrier- bushcraft style :) on 05/16/2011 12:35:23 MDT Print View

Good lesson on getting by if you lose your gear. For another pound you could add a summer weight sleeping bag and be almost cozy.

It took me a minute to figure out the packing scheme. Now I see that you have bundled the pad-- I thought it was a small bag or pack at first. You could roll the pad with gear inside and wear it cross-body like a Civil War era soldier. You could use a couple silnylon stuff sacks and cut down the weight of those military-style gear pockets too.

I did some research and found wide mouth 1 liter stainless water bottles that are 6.7oz/190g. I like the fishing gear hanger you made for yours. I need to use a larks-head arrangement on mine to maintain the seal. I have made up survival kits using the stainless bottles as they can be used for cooking and water purification as well as water storage.

Another scheme would be to use an AMK bivy bag and the Heat Sheet or two Heat Sheets, so you can cover your body as well as provide some overhead shelter.

That Gerber saw really cuts for a 3oz/$10 tool.

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
no sleeping bag on 05/16/2011 14:05:48 MDT Print View

2 years ago I got benighted by a thunderstorm (pined down by lightning at 8000') during a mountain bike ride, and spent the night in a Heatsheets bivy around a fire. Like you, I woke up cold every 45-60 minutes, fed the fire, and fell back asleep. It wasn't that bad. Woke up at dawn and finished the ride.

Nice thing about the Heatsheets is that you don't have to worry about spark holes and melting if you get close to the fire.

Doing some sleeping bagless trips this year is on my list.

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
3# on 05/16/2011 15:01:59 MDT Print View

Dale- yeah the pad is just lashed on (as is my windshirt which happen to be on at the time)

the bottle holder isn't super light, 12 oz (heavier than my Ion) but 1000D nylon is pretty bullet proof :)

my bottle is a Guyot (Nalgene branded now I think), not super light either @ 11.5 oz, I often carry a Nalgene plastic widemouth and nest it in a 700 mug which saves ~ 4 oz, wanted to try the ss bottle out w/ my stainless leader for this trip- worked pretty well I have to say

my "normal" day pack carries exactly what your suggesting a AMK heatsheet (to be used in a lean-to or debris shelter) w/ a AMK bivy to crawl into, ran out of room w/ this small bag

Dave- sounds like fun :) it is reassuring that w/ a little bit of kit and some common sense that a guy (or gal) is should be just fine w/ an unexpected night out

Mike

Ankar Sheng
(Whiskyjack) - MLife

Locale: The Canadian Shield
Re: 3# on 08/06/2011 18:43:58 MDT Print View

How do those AMK sheets compare to the plain heat sheets that are reflective on both sides?

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: AMK HeatSheets on 08/06/2011 19:24:28 MDT Print View

I can't tell the difference between the AMK HeatSheets and the orginal metalized polyester space blankets as far as warmth. The AMK sheets are MUCH quieter and have a lot of stretch and give, so I think they are better for improvising shelters, water stills, ground sheets, etc. The orange side may help in signaling.

Definitely get the 2-person version over the 1 person. I carry the bivy version as part of my back-up "ten essentials."

I've done a lot of work lately with space blankets used as bottom insulation for hammocks. They are great simply placed between a hammock and undercover, or used to make a 'Garlington Insulator' which is a trash bag with a folded space blanket inside. my version is a space blanket made into a bag and filled with polyester batting or one or two folded space blankets inside. Hammocks have the advantage of not compressing insulation used below the primary hammock surface and it gives a lot of freedom in design.

Condensation is an issue with either type of space blanket and should be considered. On the other hand, they make an instant vapor barrier to protect insulation in sub-freezing conditions. Used alone, they cut wind and rain and give some reflection. A night spent with a space blanket for emergency shelter won't be comfortable, but it will increase your chances of living to complain about it :)

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
AMK on 08/06/2011 19:29:21 MDT Print View

the biggest difference I found is that the AMK will actually hold up, I've had bad luck w/ the "old" silver space blankets- easily torn, shred, holes etc

don't know if I mentioned in this thread, but I actually folded the AMK heatsheet backup and into it's original bag (a chore not for the weak of heart :) )- it's up to another use

Thomas Burns
(nerdboy52) - MLife

Locale: "Alas, poor Yogi.I knew him well."
Heetsheets Emergency Bivies . . . on 08/06/2011 19:35:21 MDT Print View

. . . are tough, flexible, and quiet. I added a full-length stick-on zipper to mine (2.4 oz for the zipper, 3.4 oz. for the bivy). It spreads out to be my groundcloth, and zips up under my Zpacks tarp in case of rain or colder weather than I anticipated. The whole deal weighs under 6 oz and stands in for both bivy and ground cloth.

Stargazer

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: AMK on 08/06/2011 19:40:19 MDT Print View

Mike wrote, "don't know if I mentioned in this thread, but I actually folded the AMK heatsheet backup and into it's original bag (a chore not for the weak of heart :) )- it's up to another use"

What a short lesson in insanity that was, eh? That is why God gave us fat little rubber bands :)

I put one in a seal-a-meal bag and sucked all the air out, making it smaller yet. And you can boil it! :)

FYI, if you want light-at-all-costs, the Coughlans standard space blankets are 1.6oz each.

Edited by dwambaugh on 08/06/2011 19:42:25 MDT.