2011 June JMT Gear List
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Stephen Hoefler
(TalusTerrapin) - F - MLife

Locale: Happily wandering
2011 June JMT Gear List on 05/07/2011 20:37:48 MDT Print View

...Deleted...

Edited by TalusTerrapin on 07/26/2012 14:42:22 MDT.

David Lutz
(davidlutz)

Locale: Bay Area
"2011 June JMT Gear List" on 05/09/2011 11:49:40 MDT Print View

Are you sure you can get all that into a Miniposa?

I couldn't.....

Jason G
(JasonG) - F

Locale: iceberg lake
tight.. on 05/09/2011 12:09:34 MDT Print View

Ya

Edited by JasonG on 04/06/2013 16:02:11 MDT.

Erik Hagen
(EWH100) - MLife

Locale: SF Bay Area
Comments on 05/09/2011 12:27:05 MDT Print View

I would question whether you could get everything in a Miniposa as well. And if you did it would probably be very uncomfortable. You should think of getting a framed pack for the load you plan on carrying. What is your longest stretch between re-supply (in days). It sounds like you’ll be getting close to 30 lbs when you add food, water, and a bear can.

Gear Comments:
I think your ground insulation maybe a little light with only the Z-Light pad. You may want to add a GG thin-light.

Pants – lose the REI Hardshell Pants and hike in your North Face Climbing pants or visa-versa.

Boxer Briefs – lose those and use your running shorts for underwear. If it’s hot you can wear just those and when you need to wash them go commando for the day.

Bear Canister – If the Backpacker’s Cache doesn’t fit, the Bearikade certainly won’t. It had a 9 inch diameter compared to 8 for the cache. Weight wise I would certainly opt for the Bearikade.

Stream crossings – I doubt those Sprint Aquatics will be very good for stream crossings. You may want to get a pair of NRS HydroSkin Socks or something similar and wear your trail runners (I didn’t see your shoe selection). Your feet will most likely be getting wet from all the snow anyways so those will at least help keep your feet warm.

Good luck and have fun!

First Last
(snusmumriken) - F

Locale: SF Bay Area
A few additions to your list on 05/09/2011 13:27:57 MDT Print View

Map
Compass
Sun hat
Sunscreen

And I agree with previous posters that you need more of a pack.

Mike Clelland
(mikeclelland) - MLife

Locale: The Tetons (via Idaho)
feedback and insights on 05/09/2011 13:47:20 MDT Print View

You are trying to blend 3 things, lightweight backpacking, mountaineering and photography. Be aware, this is gunna be tough to fit all your LIGHTWEIGHT ambitions into this mix of desires.

QUESTION - WHAT ARE YOUR PRIORITIES???

_______________________________
My insights below:
==============

NIX - Cocoon Silk Mummy Liner (114) ----------- NIX, no need.

Tarp Tent Moment (810) ---------- NIX and REPLACE with a lighter item - Use a tarp, and save over 20 oz - camp well above tree line for minimal bugs.

Snow Peak litemax Stove (56) & Snow Peak Giga Power fuel 220 (220) ---------- NIX and REPLACE with a lighter item - Your entire cook system is lighter using a simple alcohol stove.

Plastic Measuring Cup (16) ---------- NIX (no need)

=
Ziploc For Stove and Mini bic (2) ---------- NIX
Green scrubber (2) ---------- NIX
Yellow sponge (8) ---------- NIX
Ziploc For Sponge/Scrubber/Soap (2) ---------- NIX

Snow Peak litemax Stove (56) & Snow Peak Giga Power fuel 220 (220)
---------- NIX and REPLACE with a lighter item - Your entire cook system is lighter using a simple alcohol stove.
=

Json Klass Gravity Pro (110) ---------- NIX and REPLACE with a lighter item - Just use the AQUAMIRA drops (repackaged)

Thermarest Pillow sack (54) ---------- NIX -

Liner Socks: Injinji toe socks (44) ---------- Do you really need these?

Uncle Harry's tooth powder in 2oz Container (26) -------- THis is too much, minimize

Tikka XP2 w/core (84) ---------- NIX and REPLACE with a lighter item - A petzl e+lite is 1 oz.

Kahtoolah Microspikes (362) ----------- Do you really need these? Would skill and good ice axe use be safer? QUESTION - WHAT ARE YOUR PRIORITIES???


Ice Axe BD Raven Pro 65Cm (464) ---------- NIX and REPLACE with a lighter item --- there are lighter ice axes on the market.

Glasses Case (80) ------------------ NIX, wrap in a bandana or hat, and BE CAREFUL

-----------------
Olympus E-420 w/ 14-42mm Lens (726)
Olympus BLS1 (46)
16 Gb CF card (52)
Sea to Summit Sil Pack (66)
Olympus 40-150 mm lens (292)

-------------- Yikes! That is a LOT of camera gear!

-----------------

Solio (156) &BLS1 Recharge Dock (38) ----------- Do you really need these?

TP (120) ---------------- NIX (no need)

-----------------

Petzle Elios Helmet: Is this a CLIMBING TRIP? Or a lightweight hiking trip in the mountains?

River Wading shoes: ---------------- NIX (no need)

a pair of plasti-dip coated wool camp socks ---------------- NIX (no need)

Gravity Pro Filtration System: ---------- NIX and REPLACE with a lighter item - Just use the AQUAMIRA drops (repackaged at under 2 oz)

Marmot and REI Hardshell: Considering going with Dri Ducks but I'm not thrilled with their durability. ------------- DriDucks are NOT durable, but if you are in the Sierras, there should be minimal rain and bushwhacking. THe pants are lame (make a skirt) and the jackets are AWESOME! Leave the heavy jacket behind!
__________________________________

What are your shoes?

Stephen Hoefler
(TalusTerrapin) - F - MLife

Locale: Happily wandering
It all fits on 05/09/2011 15:21:08 MDT Print View

...Deleted...

Edited by TalusTerrapin on 07/26/2012 14:43:16 MDT.

First Last
(snusmumriken) - F

Locale: SF Bay Area
Sun hat etc on 05/09/2011 21:17:07 MDT Print View

If you don't bring a sun hat you'll need a lot more than 1 ounce of sunscreen. Really, the sun is bright up there, particularly as it is reflected in the snow.

You are out for 26 days with one resupply, so if that resupply point is half way at Muir Trail Ranch then that would be 13 days of food in your pack, but if you go by your original plan of not resupplying until Reds Meadow it will be more like 18 days of food. At 1.5 pounds per day you are looking at 27 pounds of food, 15 pounds of gear per your list, 2 pounds for a bear can, 2 pounds for a quart of water, a total of 46 pounds. Still fit everything in your Miniposa?

Stephen Hoefler
(TalusTerrapin) - F - MLife

Locale: Happily wandering
re: Sun hat etc on 05/09/2011 22:57:06 MDT Print View

...Deleted...

Edited by TalusTerrapin on 07/26/2012 14:43:55 MDT.

billy goat
(billygoat) - F

Locale: West.
0.25 lbs of dinner? on 05/10/2011 04:09:39 MDT Print View

Good luck with that.

It sounds like you don't really want to hear what people think since you basically shot down everything everyone's said other than deciding you might need a sun hat (I recommend the OR Sun Runner btw) and to leave behind a camera lens.

Anyway, there's nothing wrong with sacrificing going light in order to bring more camera/climbing gear. This is your trip. But when you post asking for people to review your list maybe you might want to really think about what people say rather than posting your defense of each item. Otherwise, why ask?

Regarding your list of peaks... looks like there's nothing harder than easy 4th - it doesn't seem like you'd need any extra pants or footwear for that list (why not just bring one pair of trail runners or approach shoes and one pair of pants total?). I also think that for something like this a helmet is not going to be worth its weight - but don't quote me on that. Since you're going to be alone up there, I suspect any potential head injury you may have will be a lot more serious than a helmet could protect you from. Just don't climb under other parties. Although, I would definitely bring the crampons and axe depending on your routes. Surprised you don't have Split Mt. on there.

Edited by billygoat on 05/10/2011 04:12:14 MDT.

Link .
(annapurna) - MLife
Re: It all fits on 05/10/2011 11:23:17 MDT Print View

http://www.camp-usa.com/products/ice-axes/corsa-nanotech.asp

http://www.camp-usa.com/products/ice-axes/corsa.asp

Stephen Hoefler
(TalusTerrapin) - F - MLife

Locale: Happily wandering
Re: 0.25 lbs of dinner? on 05/10/2011 14:50:45 MDT Print View

...Deleted...

Edited by TalusTerrapin on 07/26/2012 14:44:51 MDT.

Stephen Hoefler
(TalusTerrapin) - F - MLife

Locale: Happily wandering
Re: Re: It all fits on 05/10/2011 15:52:36 MDT Print View

...Deleted...

Edited by TalusTerrapin on 07/26/2012 14:46:18 MDT.

R S
(rps76) - F
Here we go. on 05/13/2011 09:19:58 MDT Print View

You want lighter pants that will also keep you warm(ish) while "mountaineering"? Patagonia Rock Guide Pants.

You are contemplating on NOT taking a helmet (because it's easy 3rd or 4th class climbing and from what I've read, because of weight) but think the micro-spikes and an ice axe are a definite regardless of weight? You really need to rethink this. Seriously, you scare me.

You plan on not bringing the shoes that are pretty much made for what you are going to be doing, even though they weight the same amount as the shoes you are bringing that aren't really made for what you will be doing? If you are wondering if your Sportiva's are going to be comfortable hiking in...I hike in my LS Boulder X's all the time and a buddy of mine just wore the same pair for a 300 mile trip through the Sierra's with a 65 lb pack and loved them.

And lastly, you can take Half Dome off the list, unless you are going to solo the Regular Route (in which I doubt because your name isn't Alex Honnold), because all the cable permits are sold.

Stephen Hoefler
(TalusTerrapin) - F - MLife

Locale: Happily wandering
Re: Here we go on 05/16/2011 02:09:05 MDT Print View

...Deleted...

Edited by TalusTerrapin on 07/26/2012 14:47:03 MDT.

Mike Clelland
(mikeclelland) - MLife

Locale: The Tetons (via Idaho)
wants vs needs on 05/16/2011 08:01:49 MDT Print View

Stephen wrote:
---------------------
" The Mirco-spikes aren't a need, they're a want. I feel much more secure on precarious icy sections with them and that's about the extent of it."


I like that, nicely said. It's honest and it a overt verbalization of a simple gear issue. This is something a LOT of people avoid doing when they pack. One exercise I encourage when packing is to literally talk out-loud (to a friend or yourself) and really verbalize the perceived "need" over an item.

Also - Stephen is very clear he has multiple objectives. Hiking, Mountaineering and photography. Fair enough.

R S
(rps76) - F
Rock Guide on 05/16/2011 09:31:53 MDT Print View

Yes, the Rock Guide pants are my favorite pants. I've worn them climbing granite during the summer and ice climbing. Super simple pants. You can roll them up above your knees if it gets too hot while hiking and they dry super fast. By far my favorite pants (granted I am very loyal to Patagonia).

The thing I love the best about the cables on Half Dome? When you finish actually climbing Half Dome, you never run into that "I wish someone was here to take a picture of us up top" moment. There are ALWAYS people up there who hiked the cables who will take you and your climbing partners photo. =)

Andrew F
(andrew.f) - F - M

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: Microspikes on 05/16/2011 09:56:45 MDT Print View

In my opinion microspikes aren't that useful. They are not a substitute for real crampons on steep snow/ice. I would decide if you need crampons for any of the climbs you are attempting. If so, I would bring real crampons. If not, I would leave the microspikes at home. They just aren't that helpful for their weight on well-traveled passes especially if a bunch of people have already kicked in steps that you can use. In my opinion, you would be safe on the passes with just an ice axe. If in doubt, cross the passes in the afternoon when the snow is soft.

Andrew

Edited by andrew.f on 05/16/2011 09:58:03 MDT.

eric chan
(bearbreeder) - F
spike me baby!!! on 05/16/2011 11:12:38 MDT Print View

i find microspikes or the hillsound trail crampons quite useful ... especially on compacted snow/ice ... where even a shallow slope can cause a nasty slip ... my first rule is dont fall period ... it all depends how much snow/ice yr expecting and what yr risk tolerance is

as to approach shoes .... note that my inov terrocs actually climb as well as my guide tennie ... a competent climber should be able to easily climb 5.7+ in them ... on the other hand the guide tennie and some other approach shoes have shiet for tread making them unsuitable for snow/ice/mud without ... well you guessed it .... MICROSPIKES =P

R S
(rps76) - F
Re: spike me baby!!! on 05/17/2011 09:35:47 MDT Print View

Yet the Boulder X approach shoes have a Vibram sole that works quite well in mud/snow/ice. And, being a competent climber, I've climbed up to a 5.9 in my Boulder X's. Not something I do very much, or would I recommend, but it's nice knowing that I can do it if needed.