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Ryan Jordan's McHale Pack
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Mike Gerty
(michael.gerty) - F
Ryan Jordan's McHale Pack on 05/04/2011 11:17:17 MDT Print View

I'm looking for pictures of Ryan Jordan's McHale pack. Tried a forum search and a Google search. Are there any pictures of this pack in a thread somewhere?

Ron D
(dillonr) - MLife

Locale: Colorado
Re: Ryan Jordan's McHale Pack on 05/04/2011 11:34:23 MDT Print View

Mike - Include the articles in your search, I did just a quick look and the one on packrafting included a picture of Ryan's Mchale, but there may be additional ones in other articles.
Ron

Here There
(cowexnihilo) - MLife
Re: Ryan Jordan's McHale Pack on 05/04/2011 14:04:28 MDT Print View

Here it is for reference:

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/packrafting_gear_list.html

Bill Fornshell
(bfornshell) - MLife

Locale: Southern Texas
Re: Re: Ryan Jordan's McHale Pack on 05/04/2011 23:24:44 MDT Print View

Hi,

This thread has pictures of Ryan with a McHale Pack. These pictures may show the pack better then the other thread.


Pack Pictures

Mike Gerty
(michael.gerty) - F
Great thread on 05/05/2011 09:34:29 MDT Print View

Bill, thanks for tracking down that thread!

To any McHale owners who may be reading this - any advice when designing my McHale? Things you would do differently? Things you like? Don't like?

Rakesh Malik
(Tamerlin)

Locale: Cascadia
Re: Great thread on 05/05/2011 11:01:52 MDT Print View

The main things to get right with a McHale pack are the capacity and the rucksack part. I have a *huge* McHale pack (I need space for my monorail), with two compartments (the divider is removable), for example... that's the one part you can't really change once you've bought it. The material choice at that point is similarly critical -- if you can afford it, go for Dyneema; the weight savings was startling; my actual pack is bigger than the demo that Dan had me try out, but also significantly lighter.

I got mine with a daisy chain, and I'm glad that I did; I use that to attach things like my trekking poles when I'm not using them. That's something you'd want to decide up front, since adding them yourself would probably be a lot of work. :)

Most of the other accessories you can add later, like extra pouches and that sort of thing. Dan's interested in making sure that he makes the pack that *you* need, so he doesn't mind questions, and if you tell him what you're after, he'll advise you honestly.

I really didn't know what I would need when I got my pack, so I took what I was using at the time (a well-made but poorly-fitted Kinesis pack which was too small for backpacking with a 4x5) with my camera gear and said, "I need to carry this in addition to my backpacking gear."

I ended up trying out two demo packs; one was a panel loader which I didn't really like all that much, the other was a single-compartment top-loader, which I ended up preferring, even though without side access I couldn't get to any of my camping gear without extracting my entire camera kit. The lid is also an optional add-on, and you can swap it out if you want to.

If you go for a larger pack, I recommend the bayonet dealie. I don't use it much because of the camera, but if ever you decide to base camp, the bayonet feature allows you to turn even my huge pack into a moderate-sized day pack (that I'd estimate to be slightly bigger than a Windrider) with a stellar and custom-fitted suspension :)

Michael Fogarty
(mfog1) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
weight and type of load? on 05/05/2011 11:47:33 MDT Print View

Guess its depends on your maximum average loads? I have a 43" circ Chasm for trips of 5-7 days or longer, with a bear can,(50lbs) and a Merkebeiner for trips up to 5 days (30lbs) without a bear can, although I could carry one with it.
If you plan to do any summit type hikes away from camp, then a fanny-pack top lid would be a good choice, I also got the optional utility day-pack pocket and utility shovel day-pack pocket. A Garcia Bear canister will fit into the shovel utility pocket. If you plan to hump more then 50lbs for many of your trips, then I'd go with a Critical Mass pack. You might want a water bladder holder too, that will attach inside the pack or to the backside of the fanny-pack top lid, or attaches to the side of the pack as well. If you get a kangaroo pocket, you might consider a dry-bag roll top closure,(2 side straps) instead of the single center roll top strap. Hip-belt and shoulder strap pockets are a must too, at least for myself anyway. All Good Stuff for sure!!!

Edited by mfog1 on 05/05/2011 12:44:05 MDT.