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Having trouble, Help!
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Backpack Jack
(jumpbackjack) - F - M

Locale: Armpit of California
Having trouble, Help! on 04/03/2011 19:15:37 MDT Print View

I just bought a Panasonic DMC-ZS6 over all, I like it, a little big for what I wanted, but, oh well. The problem is, when I take a picture of someone and they are moving the picture of the person comes out blurred, but the rest of the picture will be fine. How do I correct this, I'm no camera buff by any means, so be gentle with your descricption on how to take good pictures. Thanks, Jack

Here's a pic to show you what I mean

dancers

man

Philip Delvoie
(PhilipD) - MLife

Locale: Ontario, Canada
shutter speed on 04/03/2011 19:25:59 MDT Print View

Jack,

Is the flash going off when you take a picture? I am assuming you are not doing anything fancy and just using an auto setting...if the flash is turned off and the light is a bit low the shutter speed is slowed down which will result in blurry movement. Double check that your flash is set to go off and try again to see if there is a difference.

John Nausieda
(Meander) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Having trouble, Help on 04/03/2011 19:43:48 MDT Print View

Your shutter speed is probably less than 1/8th of a second. On another level your pretty rigid when you shoot-the non moving parts of the scene are not blurred as much-that's good. Using a self timer helps. Then there is no chance of distorting the shot with the push of the shutter producing the blur usually vertical . Try to hold your breath, keep the camera held by both hands and against your head and use the timer for 5 seconds or so if possible. Any then enjoy the result even with blur. The alternative is a flash picture that gets it all but looks like a deer in the headlights. Also , a cheap tripod can improve everything, as can a white card to bounce the flash up to the ceiling. Much more like natural light. Experiment. Your film is free.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Having trouble, Help! on 04/03/2011 19:54:25 MDT Print View

I agree with some of what has been stated. If everything in the shot is blurred, that probably means camera shake, which means that you were moving (you need a tripod) or else your finger moved the camera at the shot time. If only the subject is blurred, then chances are that your camera saw some light, and there was no flash, so it shot with a slow shutter speed, and the subject was moving during that large fraction of a second. A tripod will not help so much for the subject only blur.

What are your alternatives? One is to turn on the flash. The flash goes very fast, and there is seldom much subject movement during the flash period. Another idea is to manually control the camera's ISO setting to be a higher number. That means more sensitive to light. That means that the camera can pick its shutter speed as it did before, but it will pick something quicker, which means less subject movement during the shutter period.

This is a harsh alternative, but that is the reason why some people pay good money for good cameras with big lenses. Those allow more light to reach the sensor, and the ISO settings can be pushed very high. But, if you don't shoot that sort of thing too much, it may be overkill.

--B.G.--

Backpack Jack
(jumpbackjack) - F - M

Locale: Armpit of California
Re: Having trouble, Help on 04/03/2011 20:17:28 MDT Print View

Most of the pic's were taken inside with the flash off. I tried it with the flash on, also got the same results. I tried A different ISO, not much difference. I tried it on auto, but most of the time it was on a program mode, were I could adjust differnt things. I was also using the zoom lens alot, my ISO setting goes all the way up to 1600, and I think I even tried it on that setting. If I can figure this thing out I will really like this camera. I tried the Cannon 1400 but was dissapointed with the quality of the pic's, so I returned it for this one, as some members here liked the Panasonic, and recommended it over the cannon.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Having trouble, Help! on 04/03/2011 20:24:04 MDT Print View

If the flash is on auto and the room light is fairly high, it won't give enough flash (if any) to freeze the motion. If you can force the flash to fire all the time, do that. Get as close as you can too-- a small flash doesn't do much at distance. Raising the ISO will get the shutter speed up, but set the flash to "always on" too.

John Nausieda
(Meander) - MLife

Locale: PNW
Having trouble, Help! on 04/03/2011 20:24:44 MDT Print View

Using the zoom will limit the light even more.How far away were you? The higher ISO settings should have worked although more digital noise will be produced. You will have to be methodical to isolate what is going on. I suggest searching reviews of the camera to begin with.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Having trouble, Help on 04/03/2011 20:31:38 MDT Print View

Flash on and flash off got same results?

Most compact cameras have a pretty short flash range, like 9-10 feet. If the subjects looked the same blurry way with or without flash, then that suggests that they were beyond your flash range. Therefore, the quick strobe flash didn't really do anything for the subject. Increasing the camera's ISO setting will increase that range slightly, but not tremendously. If you increase the ISO setting by two stops, that will get you a doubling of the flash range (one stop).

Lots of these compact cameras will take excellent photos. The problem is that many shooters want automatically excellent photos. That is OK, except that the camera doesn't always know how to interpret the light at the scene coming its way. The solution is that the shooter has to learn the automatic tricks that the camera has, and then be able to disable some of the automation. In other words, you need to be able to turn the thing to some more manual mode where you can control it to suit your human eye.

Disclaimer: When I went camping to Alaska last year, approximately 80% of my entire load of checked and carryon baggage was camera gear.

--B.G.--

Dan Frazer
(Frazer) - F

Locale: Sheridan, Wyoming
Limitation of point and shoot on 04/03/2011 20:45:15 MDT Print View

Jack.. you've ran into one limitation of the point and shoot type of camera. Your lens is simply not fast enough, f3.3-f4.9, to be able to deal with moving subject in low light. The best you will be able to do is crank your ISO up as high as you dare and hope for the best.

Good luck!

-Dan

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
Having trouble, Help! on 04/03/2011 22:18:10 MDT Print View

Jack
Take the setting off iA.
Set the flash onto Auto or forced flash on , the ISO at 400 .
I think that the camera was on the slow sync/red eye setting.
That will slow the shutter speed down to pick up available light.
BTW, with "my" setting the background will be darker.
Keep in mind that the flash will cover a longer distance with the lens set on wide than on tele .(almost twice as far...)
Use the setting you originally had for static subjects.
Franco

Matthew Marasco
(BabyMatty) - F

Locale: Western/Central PA, Adirondacks
re: on 04/05/2011 22:09:55 MDT Print View

I have a ZS3 and whenever I intend to shoot moving objects with it, I usually switch it to "sports" mode.

Backpack Jack
(jumpbackjack) - F - M

Locale: Armpit of California
RE Help on 04/05/2011 22:49:36 MDT Print View

When I was taking the pics of the dancers on stage, I was about 20 ft away with about 3x zoom, no flash, with flash, and messing with the ISO, I think I just need to take more photos, and document what settings I use on each photo, until I get the tweaking down. Thanks for everyones help, Jack

Edited by jumpbackjack on 04/05/2011 22:51:11 MDT.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: RE Help on 04/05/2011 22:54:00 MDT Print View

Jack, I think you established that your subject was beyond the range of the flash, so with or without shouldn't have made much difference. You might be able to crank up the ISO to the maximum before image quality goes to hell.

--B.G.--

Backpack Jack
(jumpbackjack) - F - M

Locale: Armpit of California
RE Help on 04/05/2011 23:06:07 MDT Print View

Bob you must be like me, don't require a lot of sleep, still up posting like me. Here are some more pic's I took today in the macro mode.

1

2

3

This seems to work really well, especially if I zoom in on the image in play back mode, you can see all the little hairs on the flower peddels

Edited by jumpbackjack on 04/05/2011 23:06:52 MDT.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: RE Help on 04/05/2011 23:25:50 MDT Print View

Just about every digital camera on earth can get a good image from a sunny flower. The trick is in being able to control the camera so that you get good results in the bad lighting situations like the indoor action scenes.

Before you try the flowers again, do this. Get a sheet of white cloth. Using yardsticks or coat hangers or anything else, build a frame that will support the white cloth in a cylinder that surrounds the flower, including the top. Now shoot the camera in through a hole in the cloth. See what you get. You will get away from all of the high-contrast light, and you can get into the subtle stuff.

--B.G.--

Frank Deland
(rambler)

Locale: On the AT in VA
Flowers on 06/02/2011 11:19:26 MDT Print View

Nice work getting the flowers in focus which is not easy with a shallow depth of field with close-ups.
With the motion photos, the higher ISO should allow you to open the aperture wider (lower number f-stop) to get a faster shutter speed which in turn stops action.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Flowers on 06/02/2011 11:26:11 MDT Print View

"With the motion photos, the higher ISO should allow you to open the aperture wider (lower number f-stop) to get a faster shutter speed which in turn stops action."

Is that what you meant to say?

[Higher ISO allows you to close the aperture down (higher number f-stop)].

--B.G.--

drowning in spam
(leaftye) - F

Locale: SoCal
EXIF on 06/02/2011 11:35:52 MDT Print View

When I was taking the pics of the dancers on stage, I was about 20 ft away with about 3x zoom, no flash, with flash, and messing with the ISO, I think I just need to take more photos, and document what settings I use on each photo, until I get the tweaking down. Thanks for everyones help, Jack

Jack, many cameras (all?) already record this information with the picture, and I see that your first picture does show it.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: EXIF on 06/02/2011 11:55:32 MDT Print View

Eugene, many cameras can record the EXIF information with the image file. However, if you shoot JPEG files, you may or may not ever get convenient access to the EXIF. Most serious cameras can shoot RAW files, and they do record the EXIF information. Then, when you move those RAW files to your computer for processing into TIF or JPEG, you typically have access to the EXIF. Often, the processing allows you to save or not save the EXIF with the TIF or JPEG.

--B.G.--

drowning in spam
(leaftye) - F

Locale: SoCal
Re: Re: EXIF on 06/02/2011 12:00:14 MDT Print View

Regardless, his camera records EXIF in his JPEG's. It's easy to view with browser plugins, some online galleries and desktop applications like Google Picasa and Adobe Lightroom. I personally use XnView the most. I've had digital cameras up to 10 years old, and they've also all recorded EXIF information in the JPEG's.