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John Harper
(johnnyh88) - M

Locale: PNW
Help getting under 10 lbs on 04/01/2011 15:43:30 MDT Print View

Any suggestions to help me get below 10 lbs for 30F+ trips?

http://www.backpackinglight.com/backpackinglight/forums/gear_lists/111cd2d3c44a7057c36cc9af78ae5bef.pdf

Some things I've been considering dumping:

1 GG Thinlight - only use SMD pack for foot insulation from ground
Slimming down my med kit
Nested Mug and Bowl (I only use the mug - it's for my coffee) - want to replace with a to-go coffee cup from somewhere, but not sure how to prevent it from being squashed

Edited by johnnyh88 on 04/01/2011 15:47:24 MDT.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Help getting under 10 lbs on 04/01/2011 16:17:24 MDT Print View

This may not help too much. Lots of people try to nest their cup into a cook pot. I go the other way around. For a bowl/mug, I use a recycled plastic margarine tub, and mine weighs 0.4 oz. I believe it has a capacity of 15-16 fluid oz. I nest my cook pot into the tub. Then, for a storage bag, that all goes into my mosquito net head bag.

For a sleeping pad, I use only two pieces of foam that add up to 4 oz., plus whatever clothing I am not sleeping in, plus the empty pack. My clothing used that way tends to be down, and it is not great to have the down compressed under me. However, that is a little bit soft, and it keeps the down warm in case I need to put it on in the middle of the night.

--B.G.--

Jeff M.
(Catalyst) - M

Locale: Costa Mesa, CA
shelter on 04/01/2011 16:54:16 MDT Print View

Any particular reason you want to get to below 10 lbs? The easiest way would be to change your shelter. A tarp and bivy combo would get you there. Cutting out the GPS would also help.

John Harper
(johnnyh88) - M

Locale: PNW
Help getting under 10 lbs on 04/01/2011 17:27:30 MDT Print View

Thanks for the suggestions. I might try something similar to the plastic tub for a mug/bowl, but maybe wrap it up in a cut-out section of a GG Thinlight for some insulation (I love my hot coffee!). Also, I would certainly switch to a tarp/bivy set up but I usually hike with my 50lb dog, so I want something like a tent I can keep her off leash in. Is there such a thing as a 2-person or 1.5-person bivy? I'm not claustrophic at all, so a bivy makes sense. As for the GPS, I guess I never even thought of leaving it at home. I might have to remember to leave it next time.

As for why 10 lbs? No particular reason - just figured it would be a good weight to shoot for to keep me lightening up.

Mike Hensel
(mike220) - M

Locale: Northwest
Help getting under 10 lbs on 04/01/2011 19:43:50 MDT Print View

Oware bivies.

They have larger sizes.

http://shop.bivysack.com/main.sc

Edited by mike220 on 04/01/2011 19:45:03 MDT.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Help getting under 10 lbs on 04/01/2011 19:50:31 MDT Print View

Get the dog outfitted with a dog pack. A healthy dog ought to be able to carry 20% of its body weight.

--B.G.--

John Harper
(johnnyh88) - M

Locale: PNW
Oware bivies on 04/01/2011 20:07:17 MDT Print View

Good to know - now I guess I can start learning about bivies and tarps!

My dog already wears a pack - she carries all her own food, water, and some booties (just in case). I only carry a pad for her because I can't find a way to non-awkwardly strap it to her. 20% huh? Well last time her pack was only 6 1/2 lbs fully loaded. Maybe I should start loading my dog up with a few more things!

Ryan Krause
(rmkrause)

Locale: Pacific Northwest
GPS, Phone? on 04/01/2011 20:10:45 MDT Print View

Why not ditch the GPS and the Phone? This gets you down to little less than 10 lb. You've got a map and compass - make sure to know how to use them and nix the GPS. Same for the phone - what use is it in the backcountry? Leaving unnecessary stuff out of your pack is free as well!

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Oware bivies on 04/01/2011 20:17:40 MDT Print View

John, dogs are not allowed to go ultralightweight. Dogs are mammals just like humans, so a 20% load for them would be like a 20% load for you.

There are dog coats available that have some warmth to them, and they either strap on or else velcro on. It is possible that something like that would be more practical than a sleeping pad.

--B.G.--

John Harper
(johnnyh88) - M

Locale: PNW
GPS, Phone on 04/02/2011 11:32:33 MDT Print View

I can see nixing the GPS as I rarely use it for anything more than seeing how far I've gone, but wouldn't dropping the cell phone be a small safety issue? I don't always have coverage, but isn't it nice to have one in case of an emergency especially since I usually go solo (not counting the dog)?

I was at ACE Hardware this morning and I randomly found a small, lightweight blanket that easily fits in my dog's pack, so no more carrying a pad for her. Also, I made an insulated coffee mug out of a plastic Taco Bell cup and a strip of the GG Thinlight that weighs 0.7 oz total. So total dropped: 3.9 oz from new mug and no dog pad and 8.1 oz for no GPS = 12 oz. That brings me down to almost exactly 10 lbs - less if I drop the phone or make the dog carry it (though that might be cheating).

Also, has any one used or heard of the Exped BivyBag Duo? http://www.exped.com/exped/web/exped_homepage.nsf/0/02A8941FB846F967C1256F2B002F6A43?opendocument

It's relatively cheap and Exped says it's waterproof, so no need for a tarp I guess? And it could also eliminate carrying a rain jacket. Living in super dry AZ, would I really have to worry about condensation that much?

Edited by johnnyh88 on 04/02/2011 11:46:24 MDT.

Mike Clelland
(mikeclelland) - MLife

Locale: The Tetons (via Idaho)
feedback / insight on 04/02/2011 13:26:50 MDT Print View

Some ideas on an already good list:
======================


Change from a tent to a TARP, saving approx 22 oz.

Nested MUG and BOWL - NIX and eat out of the fosters mug.

Take a razor blade to your pack and shave off a few oz of un-needed stuff.

TP - NIX

GPS (and case) - NIX

Cel Phone - NIX

Money, ID, Cards, car keys - THese are not "essentials" and can easily be nixed.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: GPS, Phone on 04/02/2011 13:50:03 MDT Print View

but wouldn't dropping the cell phone be a small safety issue? I don't always have coverage, but isn't it nice to have one in case of an emergency especially since I usually go solo"

I almost always go solo, and have been doing it since before cell phones. As have 1,000s of people for years. More than likely, an emergency far from other people is going to happen in an area of no cell phone coverage anyway -- at least hopefully you can hike beyond the range of cell towers :)

But if you feel more comfortable with one, that is up to you. And I am sure we can find stories of hikers who's lives were saved because they had a cell phone. I always try to analyze how they got into an emergency situation, and whether or not it could have been avoided. Of course a burst appendix 200 miles from a cell tower is something one probably cannot avoid by planning, or a rare attack by an animal. But then, life is a risk anyway; no guarantees, other than you will die sooner or later. Most of us prefer much later.

John Harper
(johnnyh88) - M

Locale: PNW
Helpful insight on 04/02/2011 15:27:44 MDT Print View

@ Nick: I suppose you are right about cell coverage vs. population. I've grown up with cell phones and am simply used to having one around at all times. I'll try leaving it at the trail-head next time. That will (excitingly!) mean the only battery-powered device in my kit is a petzl e+lite.

@ Mike: I've already cut down the straps on my pack and can't find anything else to remove except for the hip-belts, but those make it carry so much better I think they're worth the weight for now. I no longer carry money, just forgot to take it off the list. I do still carry my ID and health insurance card though, so I'll have to re-weigh those.

Nix the car keys? I think those will have to stay so I can get back into my car without fiddling with a hidden key box under my car. TP will probably also stay simply because I can't always find a reliable source for polishing in the AZ sky islands. Maybe I'm not looking for the right plants or other objects?

This is great help everybody, thanks! Just about a year ago I was carrying a Kelty Coyote that weighed 5 lbs EMPTY. You don't want to know how much it weighed full!

Ryan Krause
(rmkrause)

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Phone on 04/03/2011 01:36:14 MDT Print View

On the trail, your phone will rarely if ever work - thereby carrying it gives a false sense of security and you might not prepare for how to deal with an emergency situation since in the back of your head your thinking your covered since you got the cell.

As for the keys - I personally keep them but with me but I know some people that carry a real estate agents lock box that they lock onto a carhandle, hitch, etc.

Edited by rmkrause on 04/03/2011 01:37:41 MDT.