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Nagging Quilt Question
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JT Croteau
(JT_w6fo) - F
Nagging Quilt Question on 10/27/2006 11:19:34 MDT Print View

This has been bothering me for awhile and I can't picture in my head how this could possibly work. I am reading Glenn Hecko's instructions for making a quilt similar to how I'd like to make one.

He sews the inner and outer fabrics together on 3 seams and then places the insulation on top and sews along the same 3 seams. Finally he turns the whole thing right side out and the insulation is supposed to now be in the middle and he then sews the last seam.

I can't see how the insulation gets in the middle. What am I not seeing here? I don't want to waste $85 worth of nice material.

Here are the steps of his instuctions, as written, that I am questioning:

1. Sew the rectangles of fabric together on three sides with the outsides facing each other (if your fabric has different sides) to form a pocket that is open on one of the narrow ends. You should use a 1/2 inch seam around the edges. You can double stitch if you feel durability may be a problem. I did not.

2. Now place the layer of insulation on top of your pocket of fabric and pin in place. Sew the insulation to the fabric SEWING AROUND THE SAME THREE SIDES. Follow your previous stitching as a guide. You should use the same 1/2 inch seam.

3. You now have a pocket of fabric with one end open with insulation sewn to the top of it. Turn the fabric inside out so that the layer of insulation is sandwiched between the two layers of fabric.

Thanks

Jim Colten
(jcolten) - M

Locale: MN
Re: Nagging Quilt Question on 10/27/2006 12:04:53 MDT Print View

Finally he turns the whole thing right side out and the insulation is supposed to now be in the middle and he then sews the last seam.

I can't see how the insulation gets in the middle. What am I not seeing here?


Easy, if you do it 'right'

Slip your hand between the two fabric layers, hold on to the the material furtherest from the open end and with your other hand, push everything away until your first hand is on the outside.

The 'wrong way' is to slip your hand between the insulation and the fabric. Doing it that way you end up with the insulation still on the outside.

You can do a trial run with 3 scraps of material labeled 'shell', liner and insulation.

One variation you might consider is to sew up 3.5 sides instead of 3. Just make sure the open part is large enough for your arm and a little more. Have the open section in the middle of the 4th side. It'll make all 4 corners neater.

Edited by jcolten on 10/27/2006 12:10:23 MDT.

Frank Deland
(rambler)

Locale: On the AT in VA
quilt on 11/13/2006 10:33:21 MST Print View

I do not understand why it is necessary to sew the insulation ontop. Why not just slide the insulation inside and sew around the edges. I think the answer is that the seams will be hidden when the product is turned inside out, just as is done with a stuff sack. Infact picture your quilt as a huge stuff sack with insulation sewed to the top along three sides. Reach into the bag and turn it inside out!