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Matthew Marasco
(BabyMatty) - F

Locale: Western/Central PA, Adirondacks
Looking for a remedy for frozen footwear in the morning on 03/28/2011 11:13:59 MDT Print View

So over the winter, I have broken myself in to cold-weather trips. My technique is coming along, I stay warm and dry for the most part, but there's still one thing I'd like to conquer- putting my feet into frozen boots in the morning!

I was thinking maybe bring a couple small Platys and fill them with boiling water to warm the boots? Anyone try this? Anyone have other suggestions?

I realize that within 10 minutes of hiking they will be warmed up at least to minor comfort, but for those mornings where I take time making breakfast, doing chores, etc... it is a real PIA!

jerry adams
(retiredjerry) - MLife

Locale: Oregon and Washington
Re: Looking for a remedy for frozen footwear in the morning on 03/28/2011 11:23:42 MDT Print View

This doesn't really address your issue but

Make sure and spread them open wide the night before

If they're frozen it can be difficult to get your foot into them in the morning.

will sawyer
(wjsawyer) - F

Locale: Connecticut
Re: frozen footwear on 03/28/2011 11:34:16 MDT Print View

If Roger or Mike! see this, I'm sure they will have some good advice for you.

You could put your footwear in a plastic bag, and put that in the foot of your sleeping bag.
Depending upon temps, just using them as a pillow(maybe with something soft on top) might do the trick. If it isn't too cold, maybe you could just stick them in your heated up sleeping bag in the morning, right after you get out, and the heat left in there might help.

But first, why are they getting wet in the first place? if from the inside, try using VBL socks. If from the outside, like snow sticking and melting, you might want to look into overboots (40below.com).

Also, the more breathable your footwear is, the more it will dry out overnight and the less it will freeze.

-Will

Matthew Marasco
(BabyMatty) - F

Locale: Western/Central PA, Adirondacks
re: on 03/28/2011 11:54:57 MDT Print View

The wetness is usually a combo of both sweat from the inside, and trudging through snow, semi-frozen muddy ground and such. I think VBLs might be a partial solution, but whatever damp residuals are still on the outside of them is what makes them turn into such ice blocks overnight. Overboots sound nice, I will look into them. Also that plastic bag inside the sleeping bag idea sounds great. Maybe stuff a couple shamwows inside the boots to collect the moisture that evaporates overnight?

eric chan
(bearbreeder) - F
booties on 03/28/2011 12:10:31 MDT Print View

sleep with em ... easier if you use synth ...or put em in a bag

or/and ... use a hot nalgene in the morning and put the boots around it for a while

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Looking for a remedy for frozen footwear in the morning on 03/28/2011 12:14:27 MDT Print View

At night, you pull off your boots before you crawl into the sleeping bag. The empty sleeping bag stuff sack is already there, and it has a clean side (the inside) and it has a dirty side (the outside). You turn the sack inside-out, then put your boots in it, and put that in the foot of your sleeping bag overnight. In the morning, you remove your boots, turn the sack back to normal, and re-stuff the sleeping bag after airing it.

Repeat every 24 hours.

--B.G.--

Matthew Marasco
(BabyMatty) - F

Locale: Western/Central PA, Adirondacks
re bob on 03/28/2011 12:33:24 MDT Print View

Bob, I'm lovin it. Will try

Douglas Ray
(dirtbagclimber)

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Frozen boots on 03/28/2011 14:59:34 MDT Print View

I've had good luck using my boots as a pillow, often in the sleeping bag stuff sack, in between my sleeping pad and the hood of my pad. It's worked well down to 10 degrees Fahrenheit, and I haven't really tried it colder than that.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: frozen footwear on 03/28/2011 15:49:01 MDT Print View

> If Roger or Mike! see this, I'm sure they will have some good advice for you.
> put your footwear in a plastic bag, and put that in the foot of your sleeping bag.
Chuckle! I feel your pain!

We carry 2 large plastic bags each for our ski boots. Before we go to sleep we put each boot in a bag, twist the opening up and tuck it into the inside, and stick them upright inside the foot of our quilts. You do not want them evaporating water off inside your quilt: the water will kill the quilt, so make sure the bags are sealed up. Elastic bands for sealing instead if you want.

Works very well for us.

Cheers

Brian Hall
(brian2o0o) - F
Hothands on 03/28/2011 15:50:28 MDT Print View

I always carry a couple of hothands with me in the winter. You can throw a couple in the foot of your bag at night, or you can throw them in your shoes in the morning about 30min before you put them on.

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
frozen shoes on 03/28/2011 19:02:01 MDT Print View

Plenty of good tricks stated already. I'm in the "not a big deal" camp, just put 'em on and get over it.

If they're really frozen heat some water and pour it in/on the boots. Nice and comfy.

Charles Henry
(Chuckie_Cheese)

Locale: Arizona and British Columbia
hot water bags on 03/28/2011 19:32:38 MDT Print View

I thought about this problem myself. I have access to a good stove, and my idea is to warm water, then put it in some kind of a small bag and stick the hot water bag in my boots. The problem is finding bags that are small/flexible yet durable enough for this purpose. Any ideas?

Konrad .
(Konrad1013) - MLife
hot water bags on 03/28/2011 19:37:30 MDT Print View

1L nalgene soft cantenes are perfect for this. Platypus soft bottles are okay, but their narrow mouths are just plain dangerous when you're handling boiling water

http://www.rei.com/product/670588

Edited by Konrad1013 on 03/28/2011 19:39:02 MDT.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Looking for a remedy for frozen footwear in the morning on 03/28/2011 19:42:39 MDT Print View

When we go snow camping, despite the fact that snow is solid water and it is all around us, converting that solid water into liquid water is a thankless task. It requires a good stove, fuel, and personal time watching it. As a result, liquid water has a higher cost for snow campers as compared to summer campers. Some people may not want to spend that cost for boot warming, especially if there is warmth inside a sleeping bag that will go to waste. Waste Not, Want Not.

--B.G.--

Charles Henry
(Chuckie_Cheese)

Locale: Arizona and British Columbia
. on 03/28/2011 19:51:00 MDT Print View

You should have liquid water anyways. I would keep about 0.5 L of liquid water with me anyways in the morning. This makes it much easier to melt snow for other tasks, like breakfast, tea, etc.

At the temperatures, ALL of your water can be frozen, which is very bad if you have altitude sickness.

The good stove I use is the MSR reactor. The thing is a beast and worth the weight penalty in snowy environments.

josh wagner
(StainlessSteel) - F
heheh on 03/28/2011 21:55:12 MDT Print View

i have never done this but in theory you could put your boots in a bag and bury them under some snow. it should keep them insulated overnight. just don't forget where you put them :D

Konrad .
(Konrad1013) - MLife
Re: heheh on 03/28/2011 22:28:20 MDT Print View

But Josh, what do you put on when it's time to dig em out? :p

I think its definitely possible if done right...e.g right in your vestibule. But man, frozen or not, those boots are still going to be very very cold.

I'm not very good about this problem, so i usually wear double boots for overnighters in the winter. I just sleep with my liners in my bag. My bag just isn't roomy enough to comfortably sleep with full on boots at the bottom.

Edited by Konrad1013 on 03/28/2011 22:31:10 MDT.

Andy F
(AndyF) - M
Re: Looking for a remedy for frozen footwear in the morning on 03/28/2011 22:34:00 MDT Print View

For really cold weather, I wear boots with removable liners. The liners go into the sleeping bag with me.

For not really cold weather, I don't notice. I'm probably wearing a light breathable trail runner which doesn't seem very frozen, and it's separated from my foot by a GoreTex sock, thick wool sock, and a liner sock.

Brian Lewis
(brianle) - F

Locale: Pacific NW
put them on last ... on 03/28/2011 23:56:32 MDT Print View

Like David, I've used the "deal with it" approach, particularly on trips where it's not expected that I'll have to deal with it for more than a few days. On this sort of trip I find it helpful to do absolutely everything else before putting on the shoes (down booties really help here), then put the shoes on last and just get up and immediately start moving. Having to wear frozen footwear while in camp for any length of time would be IMO a bad thing.

Shoes vs. boots might help here too --- or at least that's my theory --- less thermal mass.

Edited by brianle on 03/28/2011 23:57:03 MDT.

Will Webster
(WillWeb) - M
Innersoles on 03/29/2011 05:16:12 MDT Print View

I pull the innersoles out in the evening and keep them in the drop pockets of my down jacket. In the morning I slip them into my goosefeet down socks when I get up to make breakfast. At least one part of my shoes are warm when it's time to start hiking.