Forum Index » GEAR » snapped a gossamer gear lt4 pole...what to do?


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Adam Kramer
(rbeard) - F

Locale: ATL, Southern Appalachia
snapped a gossamer gear lt4 pole...what to do? on 03/07/2011 08:04:01 MST Print View

snapped the lower section of one of my lt4's this weekend on a snowy decent of old butt knob trail in shining rock wilderness, NC. Did i hear they will replace one lower section for free? anyone have any advise? thanks in advance.

Edited by rbeard on 03/07/2011 08:57:52 MST.

Ike Jutkowitz
(Ike) - M

Locale: Central Michigan
LT4 on 03/07/2011 08:25:47 MST Print View

Unless you think it was a manufacturing defect that led to the breakage, they sell a replacement tip section on their site for $45.

Mark Ryan
(Sixguns01)

Locale: Somewhere. Probably lost.
Re: snapped a gossamer gear lt4 pole...what to do? on 03/07/2011 08:43:53 MST Print View

I believe you get one fix for free. Contact them. Mike is great and they have helped me out before. Great Customer service

Pilate de Guerre
(deGuerre) - F

Locale: SE, USA
Adam on 03/07/2011 08:50:43 MST Print View

Someone I have hiked with told me that she broke the lower carbon portion of her poles and that she called up GG and they shipped her a replacement for free. She is a GG trail ambassador though, so I'm not sure if it is the same for everyone, but she said they are great to deal with and just to be polite and rational and they are looking to please customers. Worth a shot.

Dan Durston
(dandydan)

Locale: Cascadia
LT4 on 03/07/2011 10:37:48 MST Print View

I had to pay $40 or so when I broke one.

David White
(davidw) - F

Locale: Midwest
Lost my first pair... on 03/07/2011 18:15:03 MST Print View

I left both of my LT4's on the roof of my car as I drove away from the trailhead. Never did find them.

Although "user stupidity" is not covered by any warranty I'm aware of; Mike went way out of his way to help me out. Really great folks to deal with. Call them up. Although the repair may not be free, at least you can be assured they'll be more than fair about it.

Ben Crocker
(alexdrewreed) - M

Locale: Kentucky
LT4s on 03/16/2011 13:27:37 MDT Print View

I snapped one in Linnville Gorge. They asked how it happened but replaced it for free. Nice people.

Jim MacDiarmid
(jrmacd) - MLife
Re: snapped a gossamer gear lt4 pole...what to do? on 03/16/2011 17:19:18 MDT Print View

I broke one of my LT4's 20 minutes into my first hike with them. I had a similar experience to most above. Sent and email to Grant with the story in the above link, and was told to contact Mike for a replacement; "First one's on us." I just had to pay the $13 shipping fee.

I ended up with a UL Pole Jack for Duomid, made out of the broken shaft.

Edited by jrmacd on 03/16/2011 17:20:51 MDT.

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: Re: snapped a gossamer gear lt4 pole...what to do? on 03/16/2011 17:42:13 MDT Print View

Jim,
When did you snap your pole, and get a free replacement?

10 months ago I had to paid full price for a replacement lower.

So I'm wondering about the policy and grace period.
At this point is seems undefined and arbitrary.

Thanks.

Jim MacDiarmid
(jrmacd) - MLife
Re: Re: Re: snapped a gossamer gear lt4 pole...what to do? on 03/16/2011 18:27:18 MDT Print View

Greg,

I just checked my email that the replacement shaft was shipped 4/21/10. Almost 11 months ago to the day. I wonder what changed in 1 month's time. Maybe I had a good sob story?

Randy Martin
(randalmartin) - F

Locale: Colorado
Durability of GG LT4 Trekking Pole on 05/27/2011 17:51:12 MDT Print View

Hearing several stories of snapped poles doesn't give me much comfort that Carbon Fiber poles in general are a good thing. Yes I can cut weight but they just sound way too fragile. Am I overreacting? Interested to hear from anyone that has significantly used LT4's specifically and if they are holding up over time or are these isolated cases in this thread.

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: Durability of GG LT4 Trekking Pole on 05/27/2011 18:01:37 MDT Print View

I think it might depend on your trekking pole style. If you always have a hard grip on them, you're liable to snap one. If, on the other hand, you have a light grip on them, they'll last you a good, long while.

I have a light grip (and I don't use a strap), so they pull out of my hand before they snap. I've used them exclusively for at least the last two years, including a weeklong trek in Wyoming where we were navigating rock/talus and scree. No issues. They've seen a lot of use in the MidAtlantic, including the ever rocky Pennsylvania, and no issues.

I even bought a second pair as a backup. I've never needed to use them.

Joshua Billings
(Joshua) - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz,Ca
fix them on 05/27/2011 19:17:01 MDT Print View

You can find a wood dowel that fits snug or a piece of aluminum round stock and 5 minute epoxy. Might not be pretty.

Samuel C. Farrington
(scfhome) - M

Locale: Chocorua NH, USA
Lt4s on 05/27/2011 21:02:59 MDT Print View

"Hearing several stories of snapped poles doesn't give me much comfort that Carbon Fiber poles in general are a good thing. Yes I can cut weight but they just sound way too fragile. Am I overreacting?"

Yes. Any stress bearing product made of too light material is going to have higher failure rates - no matter what the material. I guess those who buy these poles are willing to put up with that to get the lower weight. Not me - poles can save your life or limb - so should not be breaking at a critical point. There are lots of sturdier carbon poles on the market that are also heavier, but light enough for most, not over 8 oz each.

M W
(rcmike) - MLife

Locale: California
Carbon on 05/28/2011 02:13:32 MDT Print View

I love carbon fiber because of its weight and strength. However, the problem with carbon fiber is if you nick it, you now have an area that can fail under repeated stress. You should inspect CF poles regularly and apply CA (superglue) to any areas that have been damaged; the glue will hold loose fibers together, preventing further damage.

John S.
(jshann) - F
Re: Carbon on 05/28/2011 04:04:04 MDT Print View

I cover the bottom 18 inches of my carbon poles with black duct tape to prevent lower pole nicks.

I use one straight 18" piece of tape and apply longitudinally, not wrapping with a longer length.

Edited by jshann on 05/28/2011 08:00:49 MDT.

James Marco
(jamesdmarco) - MLife

Locale: Finger Lakes
"snapped a gossamer gear lt4 pole...what to do?" on 05/28/2011 05:57:10 MDT Print View

Contact Gossamer Gear. They will help you out, I think.

Unfortunatly, with most UL carbon stuff, broken usually means destroyed. I have had real good luck with some, but if there are longish fibers running through it, chances are it actually started to fold up while breaking. This extends the break for 4-6 inches either side of a break. By the time you get some UL aluminum tube inside and a diamond wrap outside (epoxied in both cases) you will have added about 2oz. Not bad, and you could live with it, but, that was NOT why you bought UL poles to begin with. Balance will be off, compared to the other one, with more momentum swinging out. Perhaps a few wraps of tape on the unbroken one will correct it.

Anyway, wrapping the lower 6" or so with a double diamond thread wrap (see rod building,) then a light coating of epoxy over that will prevent a large portion of wear from rocks. This will weigh about a half-3/4oz or so, but well worth it. As prevention against knicks, scratches, and as strengthening the tubing,(again, much like rod building,) this goes a long ways towards reliability. And the extra bit of weight *may* help with your stride. I like a heavier pole because of the kick-out while hiking. It swings easily. Light poles often lack that, though I use a home made 4.75oz one.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Lt4s on 05/28/2011 16:52:35 MDT Print View

"Hearing several stories of snapped poles doesn't give me much comfort that Carbon Fiber poles in general are a good thing. Yes I can cut weight but they just sound way too fragile. Am I overreacting?"

Perhaps. Or maybe it is not being aware of a general principle that applies to using UL gear in general: The tradeoff for lightness is being proportionately careful with the gear, as it will not take the abuse that heavier gear is designed to withstand. Assess your hiking style and the conditions you intend to hike in and purchase accordingly.