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Steripen Traveler?
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Brendan Swihart
(brendans) - MLife

Locale: Fruita CO
Steripen Traveler Mini? on 02/27/2011 08:37:12 MST Print View

Does anyone have experience with this model? The specs look identical to the Adventurer and I'm wondering if there's really a difference. The traveler is significantly cheaper. I'd really like to hold out for the Freedom this summer but the Traveler can be had on STP for $35 with a coupon...

Edited by brendans on 02/27/2011 08:41:47 MST.

John S.
(jshann) - F
Re: Steripen Traveler Mini? on 02/27/2011 09:11:18 MST Print View

The specs are not identical, the difference being UV lamp life.

Edited by jshann on 02/27/2011 09:13:28 MST.

josh wagner
(StainlessSteel) - F
appealling on 02/27/2011 10:05:49 MST Print View

it looks very appealing to me, as it would cut my steripen weight in half. however i'm hesitant to pull the trigger b/c of the shorter bulb length. would this be an issue treating water in a full 1 L nalgene? if a couple people say no, then please PM me the coupon code and i'm going to buy it

Troy Childs
(tchilds) - F
Re: Re: Steripen Traveler Mini? on 02/27/2011 13:01:53 MST Print View

It comes down to personal preference.

I would go with the $35 option for the weekend warrior. There is little benefit to the lighter model if you're going on an extended trip or through hike.

Keep in mind a full blown adventurer is only going to treat about 2,000 treatments worst case scenario. If you're constantly treating turbid water then there is definitely no advantage to the lighter model even at $35 except immediate weight savings.

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: Steripen Traveler vs. Traveler Mini vs. Adventurer? on 02/27/2011 14:18:19 MST Print View

I own an Adventurer and I've been using it for a few years now without any problems (one 7-month RTW and one 2-month Southeast Asia trip). The Adventurer and the Traveler Mini are identical in usage and effectiveness. Unless you are particularly enamored by the "opti" -- I would suggest getting whichever one is cheaper. Again, "same same" usage and effectiveness.

Edited by ben2world on 02/27/2011 14:26:03 MST.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Steripen Traveler Mini? on 02/27/2011 14:23:58 MST Print View

Cosmetic only.

Cheers

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: Steripen Traveler Mini? on 02/27/2011 14:38:58 MST Print View

Opti, Roger, Opti! :)

Michael Skwarczek
(uberkatzen) - F

Locale: Sudamerica
Re: Steripen Traveler Mini? on 02/27/2011 15:56:06 MST Print View

Very "Special Ops" of you, Ben.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Steripen Traveler Mini? on 02/27/2011 20:01:09 MST Print View

Hi Ben

Oops, I missed the 'mini' bit. The Traveler Mini is NOT the same as the Traveler. I suspect the Mini is meant for hotel use - making a glass of water suitable for cleaning your teeth... It is only set up to do 0.5 L.

But you are right - I like the Opti.

Cheers

Edited by rcaffin on 02/27/2011 20:03:00 MST.

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: Steripen Traveler Mini? on 02/27/2011 20:05:31 MST Print View

Roger:

The Mini also has the option of treating either 0.5L or 1L of water at a time. Excluding pure cosmetic changes:

o current model Adventurer = old Adventurer with opti sensor replacing metallic sensor

o Traveler Mini = old Adventurer rebranded

Edited by ben2world on 02/27/2011 20:17:18 MST.

Brendan Swihart
(brendans) - MLife

Locale: Fruita CO
Steripen Traveler? on 02/27/2011 20:52:52 MST Print View

I found the adventurer opti for $62 and it sounds like the Opti is enough of an improvement over the Traveler mini/adventurer to make it worth the extra $$$. Looks like there're some of the Traveler minis on ebay for ~$35 also if anyone is interested.

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
old Adverturer on 02/27/2011 21:18:52 MST Print View

I have the old Adventurer W/ metal water sensors. I'll use that sucker 'til it craps out. By then there will be even better UV pens.

On most trips I use it 2 or 3 times a day for 90 seconds each time for bike bottle water for electrolyte drinks. I love the speed of it. Micropur chlorine dioxide tabs are for my hydration bladder. I refill it every night and the tabs have all night to work.

UPDATE: Aaarrggghhh! In a Senior Moment this past September I left my old Adventurer at a remote spring by a well-used trail in the mountains near Las Vegas. There's NO chance it would have been still there two weeks later, when I discovered the loss. Now I have to get a new one, so it's going to be the "Opti" Adventurer - with my name and phone # on it!

Edited by Danepacker on 10/31/2011 18:47:39 MDT.

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: old Adverturer on 02/27/2011 21:38:50 MST Print View

At the risk of beating this tired thread even more...

I am curious what practical advantage the opti has over a metal sensor -- in terms of water treatment ease of use and effectiveness? For me, I am not must interested in using it as a LED light since I always carry a separate light. I too have the old Adventurer.

Christopher Mills
(Hiker816) - MLife

Locale: Denver
Re: Re: old Adverturer on 02/27/2011 23:42:42 MST Print View

"I am curious what practical advantage the opti has over a metal sensor -- in terms of water treatment ease of use and effectiveness? For me, I am not must interested in using it as a LED light since I always carry a separate light. I too have the old Adventurer."

The metal electrodes rely on a charge carried between to the two terminals through the water. If your water is too clean -- i.e., free of minerals or whatever it is that allows water to be conductive (someone who knows physics help me out here), it won't register that it's in water. You can remedy this by sprinkling a little salt or drink mix into the water before treating, but who wants to do that? The opti uses an optical sensor to know it is in water, and it works with "clean" and "dirty" water alike. Plus, I think the electronics on the opti are improved so it doesn't drain the battery as much when off as does the regular adventurer.

James Marco
(jamesdmarco) - MLife

Locale: Finger Lakes
Re: Re: Re: old Adventurer on 02/28/2011 06:49:58 MST Print View

I am not an electronics expert. But I understand about ionization. Clean water can act as described depending on the sensitivity of the sensor...the two metal plates. This is really not the common cause of failure, I don't believe. I'm not very well versed on the sensors in the adventuror, though. It could be true, though. I'm sure that a higher electrical drain will keep stuff warmer. So, a little salt will help, but not for the reason cited. The sensor should allow operation with most any ground water. I have not tested it, but distilled water will likely work.

More likely is the temperature of the water. The heat traveling out of the electronics will have a rather negative effect on it's operation. Near freezing, you might not get a complete cycle. The heat generated from the circut may not keep up with the heat lost, soo, at low temps, it will not turn on or dies early. This HAS happened to me. Switching out to new batteries did not help. It starts, runs fine for a few seconds and dies with a red sensor light. The batteries were kept in my pants pocket, so, it was not cold batteries. But, the water source was at 32F (it had some ice in it.) Not conclusive, but, highly likely that it got cold during the treatment and turned off as if it was removed from the water, due to the low current draw induced by the low temp. The metal conducts heat away from the electronics far more efficiently than the optical sensor of the Opti.

Anyway, when I got back, everything worked fine, even the old batteries. The water was much warmer, too.

Soo, offhand, I would say that the Opti has a couple distinct advantages.
1) Less idle current draw. Sort of irrelavent, just flip the top battery to kill all current drain, Opti or Adventurer.
2) Optical senser. This makes it immune to the effects of intermittant failures. However, the lamp output may vary with temperture. Keep it in a warm pocket about 15min before using it. This is easy, since you have to get the batteries warm, anyway.

With the 600ml bottles I use, I keep it in my pocket between uses in colder weather. Note that most chemicals don't work that well in water below 40F, either. The speed advantage remains. But, if the gadget gets cold, you could end up with a dead unit again.

Like anything with batteries, camera, cell phones, SPOT, GPS, readers, etc, you cannot let them get much below 50F and expect 100% of normal operation. More than the batteries, the actual semi-conductors can be adversly effected.

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Orange County, CA, USA
SteriPEN Traveler Mini OPTI UV Water Purifier on 03/10/2011 23:07:36 MST Print View

OK, so I see something on STP advertised as a "SteriPEN Traveler Mini OPTI UV Water Purifier".

This would, I take it, have the better sensor and the better battery life, yes? But since it's a "mini" it would have a little bit shorter bulb life. Have I got that right?

HJ

Edited by hikin_jim on 03/10/2011 23:09:38 MST.

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: SteriPEN Traveler Mini OPTI UV Water Purifier on 03/10/2011 23:41:42 MST Print View

Jim:

I am confused. Against which model are you comparing the Traveler Mini to... in terms of battery life and bulb life?

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Orange County, CA, USA
Re: Re: SteriPEN Traveler Mini OPTI UV Water Purifier on 03/10/2011 23:53:00 MST Print View

Oh, duh, sorry, Ben.

In terms of battery life, I'm comparing the Opti version to pre-Opti versions. Based on the BPL review, supposedly Steripen has correct the high drain that used to require people to take the batteries out when not in use.

In terms of bulb life, I'm comparing the mini version to non-mini versions. My understanding is that on the mini versions the bulb's life expectancy is shorter.

Did you see the link I posted? What do you think of that particular model? Thinking about picking one up. Don't like chemical taste, and filtering can be a hassle.

HJ

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: Re: Re: Re: old Adventurer on 03/10/2011 23:53:14 MST Print View

James Marco wrote, "Soo, offhand, I would say that the Opti has a couple distinct advantages.
1) Less idle current draw. Sort of irrelavent, just flip the top battery to kill all current drain, Opti or Adventurer.
2) Optical senser. This makes it immune to the effects of intermittant failures. However, the lamp output may vary with temperture. Keep it in a warm pocket about 15min before using it. This is easy, since you have to get the batteries warm, anyway."

Questions for James:

1. Less idle current draw compared to the old Adventurer? Can you point to a link or is this something told to you directly by the manufacturer?

2. Optical sensor makes the unit immune to the effects of intermittent failures? Is this from your own experience? What "intermittent failures" are you referring to?

3. Lamp output may vary with temperature. Again, can you point to a source? I ask because the manufacturer directions don't point to different treatment times for different temperatures! In any case, since water freezes at a relatively balmy temperature of 32F -- we don't really need to worry about using the Steripen in temps colder than that.

Edited by ben2world on 03/10/2011 23:53:45 MST.

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Orange County, CA, USA
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: old Adventurer on 03/10/2011 23:57:43 MST Print View

Ben,

The BPL review of the Opti does state that the battery drain is significantly reduced.

HJ