"Bearier" bear cannister
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Chris Benson
(roguenode) - F

Locale: Boulder
"Bearier" bear canister on 01/22/2011 18:21:42 MST Print View

Caught wind of this new bear cannister at Outdoor Retailer show through the JMT Yahoo group. Looks promising.

Trailspace take on Bearier 700

Edited by roguenode on 01/22/2011 18:22:16 MST.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: "Bearier" bear canister on 01/22/2011 18:35:05 MST Print View

As the owner of three bear canisters, let me say a thing or two.

I think that they must make the thing translucent or opaque. Otherwise, the bear will think that he has a puzzle that must be opened up.

The manufacturer conveniently ignores bear canisters by at least one manufacturer that could be competitive (Bear Boxer).

--B.G.--

Karl Keating
(KarlKeating) - MLife
But can you fill it? on 01/22/2011 19:17:10 MST Print View

The accompanying video shows how the canister opens but not how it closes. From the looks of the thing, I presume you fill each half and then try to press the halves together, without having any food fall out. I don't see how you can compress your food, tilt the halves to 90 degrees, and expect to connect them--without either losing food or deliberately leaving a lot of empty space inside. The other canisters all have an opening at one end, which allows you to scrunch to your heart's content. I suspect that a 650 c.i. competitor actually will hold far more than this one, which is said to hold 700 c.i.

Chris Benson
(roguenode) - F

Locale: Boulder
RE: "Bearier" bear canister on 01/22/2011 19:47:08 MST Print View

Evidently, it won't be clear. From the article, “production models will likely be a translucent color”.

There’s no doubt the bearboxer is cheaper and the bearier does not have IGBC and SIBBG certification. However, the large bare boxer is listed at 605 cu. in. and 2.8 pounds. The bearier is said to be 700 cu. in and under 2 pounds.

Of course, they only have claims at this point, but the price/weight/volume numbers are attractive.

drowning in spam
(leaftye) - F

Locale: SoCal
Re: "Bearier" bear canister on 01/22/2011 21:07:58 MST Print View

I'd remove the mesh and just use a food bag. I think it would be better if the halves could be nested because I'd want to keep both halves outside of my pack and keep the food inside my pack while hiking. I like the idea of the extender too.

Robert Perkins
(rp3957)

Locale: The Sierras
Bearier canister on 01/22/2011 21:34:05 MST Print View

The makers of Bearier also didn't include the Bearikade in their comparisons. Unless the two halves can be nested as a previous poster stated, I see this as a major inconvenient object that you have to figure out a way to attach to the outside of your pack. The Bearikade, while much more expensive, seems to be a far superior product. Just my 2 cents worth.

Javan Dempsey
(jdempsey)

Locale: The-Stateless-Society
Re: But can you fill it? on 01/22/2011 22:42:55 MST Print View

Maybe I'm wrong, but it looks like there's a mesh "cover for the open end of each half.


I'm guessing you stuff each half, put the mesh over it to keep it from falling out, and then screw it together.

Doesn't seem that hard to me. I figure you overfill each a little, strap it in with the mesh, and force em together! ;)


If that's the way it works, it's actually pretty clever. Using a soft seal does sort of solve the problem of linearity.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: "Bearier" bear canister on 01/22/2011 22:52:30 MST Print View

There is a multiple use that a traditional bear canister has, and that is as a camp stool. I don't think that this egg-shaped thing would be much good there unless you try to prop it up on three rocks. Even then, I don't think that I would want to be seen sitting on it.

--B.G.--

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: "Bearier" bear canister on 01/23/2011 15:09:09 MST Print View

The spherical or egg shape will be a problem as compared to the traditional cylinder. It will roll (away) farther. A curious bear can push it from any direction and it might not stop rolling until it is in the next county downhill.

--B.G.--

Hiking Malto
(gg-man) - F
Dual Use...... on 01/23/2011 17:13:40 MST Print View

... as a very entertaining backcountry bear toy.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Dual Use...... on 01/23/2011 17:17:30 MST Print View

"as a very entertaining backcountry bear toy."

I guess you could smear a little peanut butter inside and use it as a decoy while you sleep with your food as a pillow. ;)

Rakesh Malik
(Tamerlin)

Locale: Cascadia
Re: Re: "Bearier" bear canister on 01/23/2011 17:43:11 MST Print View

"There is a multiple use that a traditional bear canister has, and that is as a camp stool."

Ya, I can't imaging sitting on an egg under normal circumstances, let alone while backpacking.

Denis Hazlewood
(redleader) - MLife

Locale: Luxury-Light Luke on the Llano Azul
Re: Re: Re: "Bearier" bear canister on 01/23/2011 20:57:12 MST Print View

Multi-use item... May be used as a substitute for a medicine ball. Good upper body work out after a long day on the trail.

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
Bearier" bear cannister on 01/23/2011 21:36:14 MST Print View

Not obvious in those shots but the two ends are flat, so it does stand up by it self..
maybe not that useful as a seat depending on the size of yours.
Franco

Robert Richey
(BobR) - M

Locale: San Luis Obispo
Bearier on 01/23/2011 22:03:37 MST Print View

If this passes bear tests it could be a very interesting alternative to canisters currently on the market. Its capacity to weight ratio is slightly better than the Bearikade at half the cost. The flexibility of using their expander piece ($60 extra) to increase capacity from 700 to 1000 for seems like a terrific idea if it works as advertised. Their website is http://camp4outdoors.com/

Zac Rubenson
(Camp4_Zac) - F
Hey everyone, on 01/23/2011 23:46:31 MST Print View

I'm Zac, the guy in the post (and video), and the designer of the Bearier. Just wanted to hop on this thread to help answer any questions, comments, or concerns you guys might have. As Alicia mentioned in her blog post, we're still in our development phase but hope to have units available for sale sometime in May. We'll be selling directly to customers initially while we seek out retailers to carry the Bearier 700 and GrubHub.

@Bob Gross: The unit in the video is a pre-production unit. The final product will be a dark translucent red/orange, like a Nalgene. Also, I didn't mention the Bear Boxer because it's nearly identical to the Garcia. The Bear Boxer is 608 cu in and 2.8 lbs, compared to the Garcia's 615 cu in and 2.75 lbs. Also not mentioned is the Bear Keg, which is 716 cu in and 3.2 lbs.

@Karl Keating: Each half of the Bearier has its own drawstring closure that ensures your food doesn't fall out. Each dome half also contains two integrated straps, allowing you to strap the individual domes to your pack in whatever configuration best suits your packing situation. If you'd like to pack the Bearier inside your pack, the flat surface of each dome can be placed flat against your back, eliminating painful rounded surfaces against your spine. All of these features exist on the GrubHub too. As far as difficulty cramming in food, it's quite easy to compress the two halves together if overloaded, as you can just push down on the top half as hard as necessary to get it closed. The two halves lock together after about two degrees of rotation, so once you get past that initial engagement it's smooth sailing.

@Chris Benson: The SIBBG has been disbanded and no longer certifies canisters, and the only remaining certification organization is the IGBC. We've been in communication with the actual testers at the IGBC since we started development and have designed the Bearier specifically to pass every single aspect of their testing program. The final unit will absolutely be certified before hitting the market.

@Robert Perkins: Please see my post @Karl above.

While the Bearier can be used as a chair (it's designed to handle impact forces of 3000lbs), you're right that it isn't as comfortable as a convention cylindrical canister. That said, it does have a 4" flat surface on the top and bottom. And hey, you could always carry a Crazy Creek chair with the weight you're saving. Can't win em all ;)

Edited by Camp4_Zac on 01/23/2011 23:47:09 MST.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Hey everyone, on 01/24/2011 00:20:24 MST Print View

"The Bear Boxer is 608 cu in and 2.8 lbs,"

That is, unless it is the small Bear Boxer, which is only 1.6 pounds. It has less than half of the capacity, but that is still fine for a three-day trip.

Yes, let's see a Bearier that weighs 1.6 pounds and doesn't roll as easily as a cylinder.

--B.G.--

Tony Wong
(Valshar) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: Hey everyone, on 01/24/2011 00:28:12 MST Print View

Zac,

Thanks for taking the time to jump on to the BPL forums to address the concerns that have been raised and for educating us about your exciting product.

I, for one, am very interested in learning more about your product, as I am planning a 2-2.5 week Jul/Aug JMT trip this year.

I currently have the 700 CU IN Bear Vault and have been debating getting a Bearikade, but the high expense is a bit hard to justify.

The flexibility of your system is really intriguing with the GrubHub adding 300 CU IN.

Could you give us some estimate of how much weight it will add to your system?

Anyway, I have already book marked your web page and eagerly await more information and hope that you are able to make your projected roll out date, as it means that I will have an opportunity to see the final stats.

Good luck to you and glad to see someone out there finally coming up with a creative alternative to the "evil bear canisters" that we have to deal with. :)

-Tony

David Wills
(willspower3) - F
Re: Re: Hey everyone, on 01/24/2011 05:23:10 MST Print View

Looks great to me. I really like the extender option.

The biggest thing I like is a choice that is reasonably priced, and much lighter than anything else. I could honestly care less about use as a stool if it would save $120 or .75 lb over what I would otherwise have. The nifty packing system more than makes up for that. Hope you can get it passed with your current thickness for a 1.75 lb can. 2-3 ounces more than a Bare Boxer Contender for an extra 4 days worth of capacity sounds like a winner. Im sure it will become standard UL equipment if all goes well.

drowning in spam
(leaftye) - F

Locale: SoCal
Re: Hey everyone, on 01/24/2011 05:35:36 MST Print View

Have you come up with a way of carrying it? For long distance hikers, that bear canister is only good for one person, which means carrying both halves. Most of our packs are too small to store it inside with the rest of our gear, so it must go outside. It looks like that egg shape of this bear canister without the extender would easily slip out if only one strap was holding it down, like it would be with a pack like the ULA Catalyst and several other packs.

Derek Goffin
(Derekoak)

Locale: North of England
Bearier" bear cannister on 01/24/2011 07:20:47 MST Print View

how many grub hubs would you be able to add if say you had a larger party?

First Last
(snusmumriken) - F

Locale: SF Bay Area
Multiple extenders - great idea! on 01/24/2011 09:13:04 MST Print View

Is multiple extenders part of the design? It would be a really great idea: For a weekend trip for four people, each person would carry either a half egg, or an extender piece. Sounds like it would average less then a pound per person.

Big kudos for innovation in bear cans - best of luck to you!

James DeMonaco
(jdemonaco) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco
Bearier bear cannister on 01/24/2011 10:39:40 MST Print View

I'm going to hold off on getting a bear can (have been renting the heavy ass garcia ones from the rangers every time) until this is released. 1.75lbs is much lighter than I thought it would be, and I like the idea of expandability.

Carrying two halves would be nice as well, as I often don't need that much storage, so I could split it with another hiker. Or, if I DO need the space, I could probably throw one inside my pack and one on the outside. :)

Very cool design, I look forward to seeing how this progresses. Good luck on getting it passed! I'm sure we're all rooting for you, haha.

Travis Naibert
(outwest) - F
shape and size options on 01/24/2011 14:23:18 MST Print View

Zac,

I really like the light weight of this design. Have you thought about making a shallow cylindrical section that could attact to just one hemi-egg in order to make a very small, solo, short-trip option? I'm thinking a cylindrical "plate" that would hold flat objects, such as a package of tortillas and some tea bags,hot choc/oatmeal packets, maybe only about 1.5 inches deep. Then the hemi-egg could hold a few days of bulkier food and the whole canister would easily fit in almost any pack for short solo trips. The flat section would also make a nice serving tray/cutting board and would prevent rolling.

I hope you consider this option, because it would allow your product to be used as a solo canister (with my shallow plate idea), a longer-trip solo or short-trip pair canister (as originally purchased), or for larger groups (with the grubhub).

Tony Wong
(Valshar) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: shape and size options on 01/24/2011 15:54:48 MST Print View

Travis,

I like your idea of being able to make it smaller with the flat plate, but one negative that I could see is that the strength of this system to resist bears from breaking into it is the dome/egg shape to distribute the force of impact.

A flat plate might be the weak spot in the system to prevent a bear from shattering the flat plate portion of what you are suggesting.

Hope that I am interpreting your suggestion correctly...if not, sorry....I lack imagination to visualize. :)

-Tony

obx hiker
(obxcola) - MLife

Locale: Outer Banks of North Carolina
Re: Re: Re: "Bearier" bear canister on 01/26/2011 14:44:26 MST Print View

I believe Bob has a point; The thing does appear to be capable of traveling a ways once it got rolling. I've been studying the past few years of bear canister threads recently as I try to decide upon a course of action for a future trip out to the left coast.....land of the Californi..... .never mind..... I must say Bob appears to be the Diogenes of Bear Canister philosophers on this blog. You know Diogenes lived in a big barrel sort of resembling a bear canister.

Isn't the general idea of canisters (I can't find a published set of rules for canister design) that they be at least cylindrical and with a general near 9" diameter so ol' Yogi can't crush the thing in his mighty jaw? Speaking of which it seems a major disadvantage to the ursack is brother bear can get his hands/paws and mouth around it...... basically meaning that you the hiker are back to the backwoods basics of discouragement by evasion? You know triangulation, a good hang, a clean site and maybe a loksak while you're at it. Doesn't seem the ursack offers the proper degree of discouragement; more like a fair degree of enticement which could be described as encouragement; at least so far as giving it a thorough and determined go from the bears point of view ( I know......anthropocentric of whatever, hell I've been hungry too)

Seems like if you want to teach the bears to give it up you have to have a bear-proof canister that doesn't fail and better yet they can't really get a purchase on...which is one thing that looks promising about this new can.

But I could see that thing going a long ways down the right slope. Hell I had a full pack take off on an avalanche "meadow" near Cascade Pass one time. Set it down, it flopped over once with just enough momentum to roll again and next thing you knew it was taking 10 and 20 foot leaps and bounds and it didn't stop till it run clean through the meadow and sailed into a ticket just short of a shear 500 foot ledge; the bottom of which, if it didn't snag on the way down as things do when your luck is running this way; was another half days hike. I can imagine one of these (or I expect most other canisters as well) getting started down such a slope and good night Irene.

I understand the canister will have loop holes on the exterior or something equivalent for rigging straps or what have you. Maybe if you were camping near a slope you could attach a length of cord with a stick on the end to discourage the thing from becoming a rolling stone.

And check this out: "The Bearier 700 just won Editor's Choice for Best New Product at the Outdoor Retailer Winter Market" from the makers website just now.

Edited by obxcola on 01/26/2011 15:01:56 MST.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Re: Re: "Bearier" bear canister on 01/26/2011 15:09:08 MST Print View

I was once very resistant to the idea of bear canisters. I had practiced the two-rope counterbalance hang in Yosemite for 20 years of group trips with perfect results. Then one time I had signed up for another leader's Yosemite trip, and he made canisters a requirement. So, I bought a Garcia and used it. If you are not used to them at all, you will find them to be a PITA at first. Later, you just resign yourself to it and try to learn to take advantage of a canister as a chair or table. Some years later, I bought a Bear Vault, and it seemed a little better. Then later, I bought the small Bear Boxer. For a longer trip, I might carry the Bear Vault, and for a shorter trip, I might carry the Bear Boxer.

Note that the small Bear Boxer is smaller in diameter than the rest of the market. Still, it is big enough that a standard, garden-variety, Yosemite black bear can't get its mouth onto it to bite, and it can't find any holes big enough to apply teeth or claws. I don't think that this Bearier should have exterior loop holes for straps, although interior would be OK.

In Yosemite, it has gotten to the point where the bear walks into camp at midnight, sees the canister, knocks it over with one paw, then continues walking. I generally plant my canister in the middle of some big rocks so that the bear can't get any rolling started.

I'm always amazed when I see somebody putting their bear canister into a thin nylon sack so that they can hoist it up into a tree. Then they tie off the rope near ground level. Geez! That's bad. The bear finds the rope, and bites it or claws it until it fails. The sack with canister falls to the ground. The bear bites the sack and carries the whole works off for further examination.

I still advocate decoys. Hang up an empty brown paper sack with a piece of bright white cord, maybe 8 feet off the ground. It has no food in it, so the rangers can't hassle you about it. The bear spends a while fooling with it, and you get the flash photos.

--B.G.--

Zac Rubenson
(Camp4_Zac) - F
More answers on 01/26/2011 19:00:59 MST Print View

@Tony: We're expecting the GrubHub to add about a pound (specific weight tbd) and ~300 cu in. And we definitely hope to be approved by Jul/Aug.

@David: Thanks for the support! The UL crowd seems the most excited thus far - a few unmentionable UL pack companies have even approached us about designing a pack specifically around the Bearier.

@Eugene: Each half of the Bearier has its own integrated straps, so you're able to strap each dome half to your pack individually. We did this because it allows more versatile packing solutions. Additionally, should you want to put it in your pack, the opening of each dome can be placed flat against your back, eliminating the spine pain caused by the round surface of other units. If you'd like to attach the assembled Bearier to the outside of your pack, each half has external holes that allow you to attach cord for strapping or tree hanging. If you'd like to keep the Bearier assembled inside your pack, the locking mechanism contains external guards to prevent the lock springs from rubbing on the contents of your pack. All of these features exist on the GrubHub as well. We also plan on coming out with a half-sized dome that can be used with one of the full-sized domes for a total capacity of 400-500 cu in and a much smaller pack size.

@Derek+Kristin: Since the whole Bearier/GrubHub system is totally modular, you can stack it as high as you'd like. If you're the kind of hiker that refuses to eat anything but 4 foot Subway sandwiches, we've got you covered. This flexibility also allows fisherman to pack a full-size fish inside the system, pack it with snow, and have a bear-proof fish container.

@Travis: We plan on coming out with a half-sized dome that can be used with one of the full-sized domes for a total capacity of 400-500 cu in and a much smaller pack size.

@Tony: We'll be doing some serious engineering to ensure the half-size dome will still pass all testing standards (including actual bears).

@Cola: Rolling is certainly a concern with ANY bear canister on the market. Cylinders roll too. That said, we're working on partnering with PacSafe to come out with a super-strong attachment mechanism. Most hikers seem to prefer the bare minimum, weight-wise, as long as it's approved. I'll bet people would start using Tupperware if it got approved somehow.

obx hiker
(obxcola) - MLife

Locale: Outer Banks of North Carolina
Bearier" bear cannister on 01/26/2011 19:10:21 MST Print View

No worries Zack, That whole biz about the can rollin off the mountain was strictly tongue in cheek entertainment. kinda like disqualifying the can because you can't sit on it. I like dual or multi use gear as much as anyone but sheesh.

Congratulations on The Editors Prize. You must be deservedly proud!

drowning in spam
(leaftye) - F

Locale: SoCal
Re: More answers on 01/26/2011 19:32:45 MST Print View

If you'd like to attach the assembled Bearier to the outside of your pack, each half has external holes that allow you to attach cord for strapping or tree hanging.

That sounds like the ideal solution for me. Thanks.

Hiking Malto
(gg-man) - F
Ursack on 01/26/2011 20:19:03 MST Print View

Cola,
The Ursack can be grabbed and crushed by the bear but their teeth are not sharp enough to rip into the kevlar, so there is no food rewartd for the bear. The aluminum sleeve is suppose to stop the crushing but at that point you might as well carry a canister.

obx hiker
(obxcola) - MLife

Locale: Outer Banks of North Carolina
kevlar bulletproof ursack yah on 01/26/2011 20:50:43 MST Print View

Exactly.

I imagine Samuel Clemens could've written a story centered around an evenings entertainment observing a bear dancing around with an ursack that'd bring tears to your eyes. And adding that aluminum canister doesn't seem like it'd reduce the opportunity for dramatic entertainment all that much. I think you'd be about as well off carefully keeping the scent away, hanging properly and so forth except if all else failed maybe with an ursack you'd luck up and keep your food though it might be pre-chewed.

I think I'd rather get a little peace of mind and simplicity for my 2 lbs and ??$$ I mean why bother? It just seems like theres a long string of holes in the ursack theory but hey I'm all ears (or eyes on a blog)

Joseph Reeves
(Umnak)

Locale: Southeast Alaska
Re: kevlar bulletproof ursack yah on 01/26/2011 23:35:26 MST Print View

The Ursacks work really well here in Southeast Alaska, and especially if used with the OPSak. We've used ours for 10 years on Admiralty, Chichagof and Baranof Islands, as well as around Juneau (tied well, then secured to a limb of a tree). They are the most commonly used barrier here, though it is true that most people simply hang their food in a bag.

I'll admit a canister is more comfortable to sit upon, but I'd rather have the weight advantage -- and the space advantage once the food diminishes -- of an Ursack.

Maybe bears are smarter and bigger Outside, but ours simply can't figure out how to get at the food.

drowning in spam
(leaftye) - F

Locale: SoCal
Re: kevlar bulletproof ursack yah on 01/26/2011 23:46:36 MST Print View

Of course an Opsak can be used with an Ursack, and an Ursack can also be hung. Triple protection.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: kevlar bulletproof ursack yah on 01/27/2011 17:15:07 MST Print View

"Of course an Opsak can be used with an Ursack"

Isn't this pretty much SOP? If not, it should be, as it saves a lot of potential hassles and aggravation.


"and an Ursack can also be hung."

Probably not a good idea. As Bob Gross pointed out earlier, if the bear chews through the rope and drops the bag, he's got something to grab on to(the tag end of the bagging rope) so he can drag it away and work on it at his leisure.

Regarding comments on the uselessness of the aluminum insert, IMO the insert is well worth the ~14 oz for the added protection it offers. If you properly tie off the Ursack, a bear will have a very difficult time finding any way to bring his jaws into play on the fabric of the Ursack, and will not be able to crush your food in the process. Also, even with the insert an Ursack is ~7 oz lighter than a Bearikade Weekender, the next lightest canister with approximately the same volume.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Re: kevlar bulletproof ursack yah on 01/27/2011 17:27:57 MST Print View

"...so he [the bear] can drag it away and work on it at his leisure."

Don't underestimate a Yosemite black bear. They take their work very seriously, and the nighttime is not their leisure time. More typically, they sleep by day and patrol at night. They feel as though it is their God-given responsibility as denizens of the forest to see what you brought in the goodie-bag. If they don't capture your food bag, who will? They extend this responsibility for a full inspection of each and every package of food that they encounter. They accomplish that by way of claw and tooth. They are particularly fond of Louis Meyer cold cuts.

Years ago, I was camped near Vogelsang High Sierra Camp in Yosemite. One nearby camper was not sure about his bear canister, so he tied rope around it and hung it over the edge of the cliff. Well, Mister Bear came along at night, clawed or bit the rope, and the canister plunged a hundred feet or more down onto the rocks, thereby splitting it open like one of Gallagher's ripe watermelons. Not recommended.

--B.G.--

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: Re: Re: kevlar bulletproof ursack yah on 01/27/2011 18:04:07 MST Print View

"Don't underestimate a Yosemite black bear."

I never underestimate any bear. As for Yosemite, I haven't been back there since 1974 for backpacking, and only once for climbing. Overcrowded, polluted, and infested with bears that are way too numerous and smart for their own, and my, good, not to mention way more rangers than I like to deal with. Yeah, I know, it's beautiful, etc, and the rangers are there for a reason, but I know of places far more beautiful(to my mind) and less encumbered with all of the above unpleasantness.

"They take their work very seriously"

Semantics. I should have said "undisturbed".

"and the nighttime is not their leisure time. More typically, they sleep by day and patrol at night."

Neither is daytime. Allowing for the occasional cat nap or longer interlude of sleep that comes with a full belly, they are open 24/7 in their unending search for enough food to gain the fat they need to survive through the winter. I have seen far more bears during daylight hours than at night, although I suspect part of that is due to where I generally backpack, campsite selection and very careful food management. YMMV, I suppose, depending on the aforementioned variables and probably others unmentioned.

Hiking Malto
(gg-man) - F
You mean this Bob on 01/27/2011 18:06:46 MST Print View

bearcant
One Backpacker's Worst Nightmare at Thousand Island Lake

Edited by gg-man on 01/27/2011 18:07:51 MST.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: You mean this Bob on 01/27/2011 18:20:38 MST Print View

That bear is simply counting the stitches in each bartack and admiring the sewing.

I was camped at Matthes Lake one time. I got up early to start breakfast for the group. One gal left her backpack beside her tent and walked toward the stoves. A second later, I looked toward her tent and saw a bear just like this one. It was up on his hind legs staring down into the backpack and starting to apply its paws. I ran directly at the bear, screaming "Bear, Bear!" The bear waited until I was about halfway to it, and then it dashed off empty. I tried to keep chasing it, but bears are several times faster than I could run. The bear never returned.

--B.G.--

Ken Helwig
(kennyhel77) - MLife

Locale: Scotts Valley CA via San Jose, CA
Re: You mean this Bob on 01/27/2011 18:31:29 MST Print View

Great pic Greg! I never knew there were bears at 1000 Island Lake...at least I have never seen on yet......................

Hiking Malto
(gg-man) - F
Re: Re: You mean this Bob on 01/27/2011 18:40:27 MST Print View

Haven't seen them either. This was a picture from a Trail journal of a hiker, trail name - Bearcan't. Wanna guess why???? Made an impression on me!

Ken Helwig
(kennyhel77) - MLife

Locale: Scotts Valley CA via San Jose, CA
Re: Re: Re: You mean this Bob on 01/27/2011 18:50:32 MST Print View

Nice! I was bragging last summer about my lack of bear experiences before starting the Rae Lakes Loop. I saw 3 bears in 5 hours on day one. (however that was my only day niking due to my back). Long story. I rarely see bears....dunno why.

And as someone who has used Ursack's since they started. I love them. Be smart in using them and they are a fantastic tool!

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: Re: Re: You mean this Bob on 01/27/2011 20:03:17 MST Print View

"Long story. I rarely see bears....dunno why."

Maybe you need to reevaluate your personal grooming products, Ken. ;)

re Ursacks:

"Be smart in using them and they are a fantastic tool!"

+1

Hiking Malto
(gg-man) - F
Re: Re: Re: Re: You mean this Bob on 01/28/2011 09:39:22 MST Print View

Ken, let me guess, you hike clockwised and saw the bears near the Paradise Valley campsites. I've only seen two bears in the "wild" and one was there last year. I think the bears have learned to stay near civilization, tearing into logs for a few bugs is too much work.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: You mean this Bob on 01/28/2011 14:20:38 MST Print View

When I last went that way, all of the other Paradise Valley campers reported bears during the previous night, but I didn't camp there. Halfway between Woods Crossing and Dollar Lake, there was a young black bear in the bushes by a stream. It's the big, ugly, male black bears that you want to avoid, because they don't take "No" for an answer.

--B.G.--

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: You mean this Bob on 01/28/2011 16:52:12 MST Print View

" I think the bears have learned to stay near civilization, tearing into logs for a few bugs is too much work."

+1, with one possible caveat: when an increasing bear population forces some bears to seek new territory. As an example, last September, as a friend and I were descending the last half mile of JMT/Kern Canyon connector trail, we kicked up a sow and two cubs. They were the first bears I have ever seen in 37 years of visiting that area. I am tempted to correlate this with an increasing problem with bears along the JMT, which is ~3.5 miles from the area I describe; this is a hypothesis, no more, at this point, but it makes a lot of sense to me.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: You mean this Bob on 01/28/2011 17:05:51 MST Print View

"I am tempted to correlate this with an increasing problem with bears along the JMT"

That's interesting. The bears report an increasing problem with people along the JMT.

--B.G.--

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: You mean this Bob on 01/28/2011 17:24:43 MST Print View

"The bears report an increasing problem with people along the JMT."

Talk about ungrateful. Without all those mobile 7-11's, Yogi and company would be back to nuts and berries.

Keith Selbo
(herman666) - F - M

Locale: Northern Virginia
be-all-end-all on 01/28/2011 19:59:04 MST Print View

I certainly like the idea of an ultralight, feature rich bear canister, but I also like dual use to offset the burden of having to carry one in the first place. I don't carry a table or a chair owing to their weight, but they are great luxuries for me, and I've enjoyed using my Bearikade for that reason.

I assume the domes allow them to make it lighter because there isn't a flat surface for a bear to put his weight on or something like that. It's clear these guys are thinking hard about this. I'm sure some future version will be the be-all-end-all of bear cannisters/4season shelters. When that happens

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: be-all-end-all on 01/28/2011 20:02:25 MST Print View

I can see not being able to use this as a table, but not sure why people keep saying you can't sit on it. I sit on a swiss ball fully inflated for hours while at the computer, not sure why you couldn't sit on this (that is, as long as it will support the weight).

Warren Greer
(WarrenGreer) - F

Locale: SoCal
Sit on it on 01/28/2011 20:10:19 MST Print View

If you can't sit on it, then it probably wouldn't get certified either? In any event, its probably not very comfortable to sit on, but if you put a sit pad on it it would probably help allot. Otherwise it would most likely be like sitting on a rock or a section of tree or tree limb. I'm going to carry a few extra oz's this year so I can make my inflatable sleeping pad into a chair. I'm tired of sitting on things that are so hard. They make me sore and take the fun out of lounging around camp.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Sit on it on 01/28/2011 20:51:53 MST Print View

"In any event, its probably not very comfortable to sit on"

+1 It looks like the Mother of All Suppositories to me. :-(

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: Re: Sit on it on 01/28/2011 20:53:27 MST Print View

"It looks like the Mother of All Suppositories to me."

I've been told more than once that I'm the mother of all suppositories. Nice to know I have competition.....

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: Re: Sit on it on 01/28/2011 20:55:28 MST Print View

"Nice to know I have competition....."

May the best, uh never mind...

cary bertoncini
(cbert) - F

Locale: N. California
doug on 01/28/2011 21:08:36 MST Print View

your Swiss friend doesn't mind?

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: doug on 01/28/2011 21:12:48 MST Print View

"your Swiss friend doesn't mind?"

Nah. We have a ball together....

Warren Greer
(WarrenGreer) - F

Locale: SoCal
Re: Re: Re: Sit on it on 01/28/2011 23:48:27 MST Print View

"I've been told more than once that I'm the mother of all suppositories. Nice to know I have competition...."

Now that's funny Doug!

Warren Greer
(WarrenGreer) - F

Locale: SoCal
Any news? on 04/04/2011 21:13:33 MDT Print View

On this new bear cannister?

Tony Wong
(Valshar) - MLife

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Re: Any news? on 04/05/2011 11:24:23 MDT Print View

http://www.camp4outdoors.com/products.html

Sadly, no news as of yet.

My guess is that they are simply waiting for an approval of their canister.

Hope it happens soon....I would like to use this on my JMT hike in August.

-Tony

Mark Hudson
(vesteroid) - MLife

Locale: Eastern Sierras
reason its rounded / oval on 04/05/2011 12:42:58 MDT Print View

While I dont know this for sure, I suspect the reason its egg shaped is so it can be vacuum formed. You have to have enough angle for the plastic to release from the mold. You can not make 90 degree corners very well, and certainly not deep pulls with 90 degree corners.

I think I have posted this before, but from my email exchange with these guys they were talking july or so before this was available.

Too late for my needs, wish it werent true however, now I have to buy carbon fiber and sell my first born son

(anyone want a 13 year old, who doesnt eat much, but doesnt work much either?)

Ken Helwig
(kennyhel77) - MLife

Locale: Scotts Valley CA via San Jose, CA
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: You mean this Bob on 04/05/2011 15:24:03 MDT Print View

Just saw this thread. Yep Greg we were heading to Paradise.

Bryce F.
(bster13) - MLife

Locale: Norwalk, CT
Update? on 08/08/2011 21:34:28 MDT Print View

How is this canister coming along?

Warren Greer
(WarrenGreer) - F

Locale: SoCal
Still in Pre-Order status on 08/08/2011 21:41:01 MDT Print View

per the website. I wished that they had gotten it together sooner. Anyway, no news on their website - http://www.camp4outdoors.com/products.html

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: Still in Pre-Order status on 08/08/2011 22:00:10 MDT Print View

Never gonna happen I'm guessing...

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: "Bearier" bear canister on 01/22/2012 14:33:57 MST Print View

With the recent new canister also being developed I wonder about this one. Any life left in this project? How will new canister entries be tested and certified?

Warren Greer
(WarrenGreer) - F

Locale: SoCal
?? on 01/22/2012 18:15:25 MST Print View

Ken, what new canister? Is there another one recently released? Thanks.

Link .
(annapurna) - MLife
Re: ?? on 01/22/2012 18:20:07 MST Print View

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=58464

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/forums/thread_display.html?forum_thread_id=58503