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help me pick out a new ski setup for my wife
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Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
help me pick out a new ski setup for my wife on 11/10/2010 08:45:06 MST Print View

First off I'm not a skier (snowshoer), so my knowledge level is on the low side. My wife currently has a set of old waxless Fishers, circa mid 70's- an entry level basic x country ski as near as I can tell. They work OK, but I think the lack of metal edges is one of the reasons they are only OK.

I'd like to get her into something a little more conducive for backcountry touring (nothing hardcore) when I go snowshoeing. I'd also like the skis to be still suitable for romps around the golf course, her favorite winter exercise. She isn't in to telemarking/downhill so doesn't need to lean that way.

Waxless as she wants prefers the simplicity.

Suggestions on skis, bindings and boots (something a little on the warm side would be helpful) would be most welcome :)

thanks in advance

Mike

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
just say no on 11/10/2010 19:07:19 MST Print View

To snowshoeing, that is. ;)

It's actually rather tough to do a ski/snowshoe trip. Skis are much faster in some situations (breaking trail in deep snow, hard snow), snowshoes faster in others (very steep ups, bushwacking). I'd suggest getting yourself some skis, or her some snowshoes.

The other issue is that a ski rig good for golf course cruising will be too skinny for breaking trail, and fatter skis with metal edges will be heavy and feel slow on the course.

All that said, I'd get one of the lightest/skinniest full metal edge skis available, some NNN-BC bindings, and burlier NNN-BC boots.

E J
(mountainwalker) - MLife

Locale: SF Bay Area & New England
Boots like these? No to plastic boots and AT bindings? on 11/10/2010 19:23:26 MST Print View

Boots like these?

Fischer BCX 6 Backcountry Ski Boots
http://www.rei.com/product/791112

Alpina NNN BC 1550 Backcountry Boots - Men's
http://www.rei.com/product/743063

or something heavier, and if heavier, could you provide some examples?

I've been learning from this thread as well. Been looking to move beyond snowshoeing and x-country skiing to backcountry skiing, but like Roger C, more x-country style point A to point B skiing than big mountain screaming downhills. For this type of skiing, with a 20-30 lb pack or pulk, would you stay away from plastic/AT setups, even light ones?

Powder hounds touring in big mountain areas with 20-35 lb packs seem to need plastic boots and strong bindings for control and likely warmth.

PS Please make sure you get avalanche training and pay attention to weather and snow pack conditions - surprisingly safe looking areas can be dangerous.

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
someday :) on 11/10/2010 19:34:53 MST Print View

I've skied a little and someday might join in the fun more often :)

she's enjoys skiing enough don't know I'd get her into snowshoes, more likely it will be me joining her

I know there is some dichotomy in my request, but being super fast at the gold course isn't a goal- just a setup that wouldn't prohibit that activity

conversely nothing too extreme on the backcountry end of the scale either

thinner, metal edged skis sounds like what I should be looking for- how would you rate the Fischer E89 or 99's in that regard? others that I should look into?

I'll look into the NNN bindings and compatible boots

thanks!

Mike

E J
(mountainwalker) - MLife

Locale: SF Bay Area & New England
looking for the same on 11/10/2010 19:49:27 MST Print View

Mike my wife and I are looking for exactly the same - please let me know what you zero in on in the end. I'll share any suggestions from our local backcountry club and other forums.

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
good deal on 11/10/2010 20:07:49 MST Print View

well with two of us digging into it, we should be able to come up w/ something :)

David Lutz
(davidlutz)

Locale: Bay Area
Alpinas on 11/10/2010 20:28:55 MST Print View

I'm sort of at the same spot as you guys and I have 99% settled on the Alpina 1555s but for a three-pin binding.

From what I have learned, any boot with a hard shell will overpower my skis just a bit and not be comfortable for all-day wear.

I also just want to get from point A to point B with a short pitch thrown in if I get really ambitious.

This will be my set up when I'm done:

Karhu Lookout skis (175cm length, 70/60/63 sidecut)
Rotefella thee-pin bindings
Alpina 1575 boots

Looking into avalanche training now.

I can't wait to give it a go!

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
the more the merrier on 11/10/2010 20:43:03 MST Print View

^ looked up those skis- look like they may be discontinued??? (saw some good prices on used ones though)

random selection of skis that look they MIGHT work

Fischer E89- not overly wide, sounds like a decent compromise ski

Fischer Silent Spider- sounds like this ski was built as a "compromise" ski- still metal edged

Rossignol BC 65 or 70 skis, 70 a little more backcountry orientated than the 65, both metal edged

David Lutz
(davidlutz)

Locale: Bay Area
"help me pick out a new ski setup for my wife" on 11/10/2010 20:52:59 MST Print View

The Karhu Lookouts are older and discontinued and I did get a good deal on a used pair.

Boots turn out to be a real hassle to find used because of the size differences.

I googled "Craigslist Boot X" every night until I went crazy and never found anything I was interested in. If you stay away from hardshell, they're not too expensive.

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
touring skis on 11/11/2010 07:32:28 MST Print View

The Fischer E89 and E99 both look good. Fatter than the E99 is a turning point, as much bigger won't fit in groomed tracks.

A boot like the Salomon X-Adv 6 or Rossignol BC X-7 will provide a little more power for turning and stopping in funky snow than boots without some sort of plastic cuff, and the cuff strap can be kept loose for kicking and gliding.

E J
(mountainwalker) - MLife

Locale: SF Bay Area & New England
and if you don't care about groomed tracks? on 11/11/2010 10:47:08 MST Print View

What type of ski would you recommend if you don't care about groomed tracks? Sincere apologizes for thread hijack...Even the local golf course probably doesn't have much in the way of groomed track.

My wife and I are at a point where we would either buy a pair of used skis for groomed tracks or just rent them for the once-in-a-while track ski, as we're more interested in traveling into backcountry now.

rOg w
(rOg_w) - F

Locale: rogwilmers.wordpress
deleted on 11/11/2010 12:06:11 MST Print View

deleted

Edited by rOg_w on 05/28/2012 14:40:44 MDT.

E J
(mountainwalker) - MLife

Locale: SF Bay Area & New England
thanks, level of downhill this will handle, skins on 11/11/2010 12:24:47 MST Print View

Thanks Rog. Sounds like you will be doing the kind of skiing we are looking to do. Where did you hear about this setup? Is there a particular forum or blog that was very helpful?

Will this setup perform well carrying a 20-30 lb pack or pulling a pulk?

Will you be using skins with this setup and if so which ones?

What type of downhill do you think this will handle in terms of turning control for a given steepness?

rOg w
(rOg_w) - F

Locale: rogwilmers.wordpress
deleted on 11/11/2010 12:35:07 MST Print View

deleted

Edited by rOg_w on 05/28/2012 14:41:36 MDT.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: help me pick out a new ski setup for my wife on 11/11/2010 12:41:30 MST Print View

In many cold parts of the country, snow falls and stays fairly consistent in its texture for a long time. For example, the high/cold parts of the Rocky Mountains. In that environment, if you know how to wax a waxable ski just right, you can get superior results. Unfortunately, I operate in California, and it is possible for the snow to fall and stay powdery/sugary for a while, but more typically it starts to transition within hours of the first day. A California ski tourer ends up going through four kinds of snow just before lunch time, and it is impractical to keep changing wax for that. So, waxless skis are practical for California snow, mostly for convenience. They aren't perfect for anything, but they are the practical solution of choice if you operate in a changeable snow environment.

Metal edges on skis come in several forms. One is a solid metal edge. One is a cracked metal edge where short segments interlock together. One is a partial metal edge. A solid edge is the most durable, but a cracked edge is more flexible and hence easier for carving a turn. Even if you are not a serious "turner," a metal edge ski is much more durable than an ordinary plastic edge ski. So, if you tour in the backcountry, it is a safety feature that may allow you to return in one piece. Metal edges do add more weight, but I think they add peace of mind.

--B.G.--

Ken Helwig
(kennyhel77) - MLife

Locale: Scotts Valley CA via San Jose, CA
Re: Boots like these? No to plastic boots and AT bindings? on 11/11/2010 15:53:39 MST Print View

I have the Alpina's provided in the link above...darn good boot BTW

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
golf course on 11/11/2010 18:10:19 MST Print View

yeah our gold course doesn't have any groomed trails either, it's possible at some point she would have access to groomed trails- so if the E89 or 99 would suffice in the backcountry and still be able to be used in a groomed trail that would be plus :)

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
update on 11/18/2010 15:15:31 MST Print View

found a good buy on the Rossignol BC 70 (it also appears to be pretty well thought of ski), pairing w/ BC NNN bindings and Rossignol BC X2 boots

they have a good buy on the BC 65's too, but it's a little thinner and would require a slightly longer ski- 169 vs 175, my wife does like the idea of a shorter ski (currently on 190's)

toying around w/ getting a set for myself :)

E J
(mountainwalker) - MLife

Locale: SF Bay Area & New England
how do they compare with the E99 and Alpina Lite Terrain? on 11/18/2010 15:33:55 MST Print View

Thanks Mike how do those compare with the Fischer E99 and Alpina Lite Terrain Backcountry skis?

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
comparo on 11/18/2010 16:18:05 MST Print View

as near as I can tell the E99 (and E89) are a little more traditional in that they are longer than the newer crop

the Alpina Lite appears to be on the other end of the scale, in that's it's very wide and much shorter- looks like it should really excel downhill