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Doug Hus
(Doug.H) - M

Locale: Ontario. Canada
Pyramid Tarp / Tent on 11/06/2010 11:53:06 MDT Print View

What are the short comings of a Pyramid Tent / Tarp?
(for spring, summer & fall use only)

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Re: Pyramid Tarp / Tent on 11/06/2010 12:00:16 MDT Print View

http://www.ryanjordan.com/weblog/2010/05/the-versatility-of-the-pyramid-as-an-ultralight-shelter.html

This is a good short piece.

On a side note, why Ryan's stuff isn't posted on BPL is beyond me...I think most of his writing and photos are better than a good deal of the content you pay for here.

Doug Hus
(Doug.H) - M

Locale: Ontario. Canada
Pyramid on 11/07/2010 07:26:41 MST Print View

I came across this article as well, http://sectionhiker.com/mountain-laurel-designs-doumid-cuben-fiber/

In my thoughts, the pyramid style shelter is coming up as the best all a round shelter.

Are there any ney sayer?

Thanks,
Doug

Brett Peugh
(bpeugh) - F - M

Locale: Midwest
not for the heat. on 11/07/2010 08:47:38 MST Print View

I would be all over pyramids if I could find ones that worked out for the hot and bug summers. A pyramid is not what you want to sleep in when it is 80F+ outside with a lot of mosquitoes.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Pyramid Tarp / Tent on 11/07/2010 19:48:21 MST Print View

Agree with Craig's comments about Ryan's website.

I guess ultimately it comes down to how well you can live in your shelter.

Pyramids are not new, going back to the Native American Tee Pee. Over 20 years ago I had a Chouinard pyramid. I have a Wild Oasis, which is kind of a Mid.

I remember one winter night with temps below 20F in the Chouinard. No condensation on the sides, but solid sheets of ice. Ugh. But I will admit that pyramids can handle some pretty extreme weather.

I dislike the center poles... big time. Forces you to sleep off center and closer to the sides. Of course a duo provides more room for a solo hiker. and the crossing poles let you sleep in the middle.

I have had many tents, and I keep coming back to tarps and the 8' X 10' general size work great for me as a solo hiker in most 3 season use. And I normally use the A-frame set-up. Currently I have BPL Nano Cuben. Not ideal in heavy snow.

So I usually sleep without any shelter. For 3 season wet weather I prefer a tarp; and for winter snow a winter tent. This year I will be experimenting with a Scarp 1.

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Pyramid on 11/07/2010 20:19:21 MST Print View

"I would be all over pyramids if I could find ones that worked out for the hot and bug summers. A pyramid is not what you want to sleep in when it is 80F+ outside with a lot of mosquitoes."

I have an MLD SoloMid that has perimeter bug netting and keeps out all mosquitoes.

Jeff M.
(Catalyst)

Locale: Costa Mesa, CA
which one? on 11/07/2010 20:35:22 MST Print View

"I have an MLD SoloMid that has perimeter bug netting and keeps out all mosquitoes."

Do you have an inner net or just the netting skirt?

Brett Peugh
(bpeugh) - F - M

Locale: Midwest
reallly? on 11/07/2010 20:51:39 MST Print View

Really, in a SoloMid, buttoned up not to let any bugs in, above 80F? Maybe if there was a 45mph wind and some venting.

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Pyramid on 11/07/2010 21:23:59 MST Print View

Jeff - yes, just the perimeter bug netting.

Brett - the bug netting is really long - 12" - so you can pitch the shelter reasonably high for airflow. Given your head is pretty close to the bug netting...

Even the upper vent has bug netting (removable). No skitters getting in. Even crawlers would have a really tough time, esp if you use a ground sheet and tuck the ends of the bug netting under.