Ultralight tripod
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(Anonymous)
Ultralight tripod on 03/11/2005 07:36:49 MST Print View

I came accross this tripod http://www.pedcopods.com/products.htm. The Pedco UltraPod I weights 2oz and has a fully adjustable ball head. It is made out of fiberglass with aluminum threaded components. It also comes with a velctro strap to attach to trees. Seems pretty cool. Anyone try this or other tabletop tripods for backpacking? The other possiblity I was considering is the Vanguard VS41 Flexible MiniTripod, but it doesn't have a ball head. It also weights 2oz.

Tim Cheek
(hikerfan4sure) - MLife
rei tripod on 03/11/2005 07:55:59 MST Print View

I have no experience with those tripods, but bought a similar tripod at REI. It worked fine except I set the camera on some fine sand for a self-timer shot and while I was posing the wind picked up and blew sand in the lens. The protective automatic lens cap wouldn't open or shut fully for several more days, although it works fine now. I learned to set the camera on rock thereafter.

Jay Ham
(jham) - F - M

Locale: Southwest
Ultrapod on 03/11/2005 10:08:13 MST Print View

I have the Ultrapod (2 oz, bought at REI for $10). It works great for smaller point and shoot size/digital cameras, like my Sony P-100. The ball head works smoothly, but probably won't support larger SLR cameras real well.

I use the Velcro strap for taking self portraits more often than setting it on the tripod. You can strap it to a horizontal tree branch or vertical trekking pole shoved into the ground, and the ball head will swivel enough in either configuration to compose the shot. Best mini tripod I have used for self portrait review article shots.

Jay Ham
Backpacking Light

Justin Gunn
(biggunn) - F
I have both and love them. on 03/11/2005 19:47:29 MST Print View

I have an UltraPod I that I use with my small digital still camera. When I shoot video with my Sony DCR-PC330 mini DV camera, I use the sturdier UltraPod II. Last year I shot a forthcoming short on ultralight backpacking with Glen Van Peski of Gossamer Gear and used the UltraPod II strapped to a tree to get great shots of our whole hiking group trekking through frame. This was also my only tripod for interviews and lockdown shots. They're both great.

Edited by biggunn on 03/11/2005 19:48:34 MST.


(Anonymous)
Ultralight tripod on 09/05/2005 21:14:34 MDT Print View

I have one from [urldecode=http://www.rei.com/online/store/ProductDisplay?storeId=8000&catalogId=40000008000&productId=894&parent_category_rn=4760433&vcat=REI_SEARCH]REI[/url] which looks similar to the pedcopods and it works great.


(Anonymous)
Ultralight tripod on 09/05/2005 21:16:19 MDT Print View

I have one from pedcopods and it works great.


(Anonymous)
Ultralight tripod on 09/05/2005 21:16:51 MDT Print View

Thrid try -
I have one from REI which looks similar to the pedcopods and it works great.

William B Ross
(wbrianross) - F
camera monopod on 04/12/2006 17:15:06 MDT Print View

Is anyone aware of a small, collapseable, light-weight monopod collapsable to under 10" but with standard full extension height? Most I seem to find collapse to 18 - 20 inches and aren't that lightweight. And, I don't use treking poles, so that "conversion" option won't fit what I'm looking for.

Thanks,

W.

Nick DeBarmore
(nicodebarmore) - F
Ultralight Tripod for Pro Camera Gear on 06/28/2012 08:58:43 MDT Print View

These tripods are all fantastic for self portraits and simple images, especially with point and shoots. I want to throw my two cents out there regarding tripods and pro-level DSLR setups.

And yes, a pro-level dslr flies in the face of ultralight principles, but for me it is a required item. In fact, for a weekend trip my pack would normally be 12-15 lbs, but my camera gear brings it up to ~25 lbs. Still not too bad, in my opinion.

The tripod: Gitzo GT1542T Series 1 6X Carbon Fiber Traveler 4 Section G-Lock Tripod for Cameras

These tripods are super sturdy, super versatile, super light (carbon fiber), and unfortunately, super expensive. That high cost will get you a tripod that will last a lifetime and if something breaks (I had an extreme case in a waterfall), Gitzo has fantastic customer service and repair options.

If you are shooting self portraits for an online article, stick with the point and shoot and the very small superlight tripods mentioned above. But if you are shooting pro-level large print quality and panoramas, look into something like that Gitzo.

I've got more info on ultralight pro photog backpacking setup on my website at
www.nicodebarmore.com

Cheers,
Nico

Edited by nicodebarmore on 06/28/2012 08:59:55 MDT.

Jim Larkey
(jimlarkey) - MLife

Locale: NoCO
Re: Ultralight tripod on 06/29/2012 13:32:29 MDT Print View

I've used the UltraPod for a while. I've never wrapped the strap on a tree limb, but use the wrap to:
+ Carry it on my hiking pole for quick access (as pic'd).
+ Wrap it on the cork handle, and use pole in soft ground as tripod (self-portraits)

Works good, would recommend.

UltraPod

Edited by jimlarkey on 06/29/2012 13:33:37 MDT.

Andy Bryant
(andybryant)

Locale: The Alps
Ultrapod II is the winner on 07/15/2012 09:58:54 MDT Print View

Another vote for the ultrapod ii - and I also sometimes hike with it attached to the hiking pole. I've added a small RRS QR clamp to the top which makes it super fast to attach to the plate on my camera.

Gregory Stein
(tauneutrino) - F

Locale: Upper Galilee
Re: Ultralight Tripod for Pro Camera Gear on 07/16/2012 06:01:48 MDT Print View

Interesting. 10 lbs?
So I think you take your 50mm f/1.2 (OMG!) and your walk-around 24-70mm f/2.8? Plus 5DMkII.

I currently shoot with Nikon D80, 50mm f/1.4 & 18-70 f/3.5-4.5. Wanting to switch to a full frame of the same 5DMkII, but thought about 17-40 f/4L as walkaround + 50f/1.4
For landscapes you don't need f2.8 and 17-40 should be decent lens (according to pics I saw on pbase.com). What do you think about this combo? I think that switching from 1.5 crop factor to FF is a little dangerous for me in the matter of focal lengths, because on FF I get 17mm, not the 25, and 40mm are real 40. I don't care for telephoto right now.

BTW, I use polarizing filter and ND gradient 0.6 soft circular filter (Tiffen). Just because I dont want to mess with the holder attaching frame. Yes, I can't move the horizon up and down. But I find it still very versatile. I wanted to move the horizon in 80% of shoots, but this circular filter is so simple and light... Just IMHO.

Cheers.