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tent stakes/pegs
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rhonda rouyer
(rrouyer) - F

Locale: deep south
tent stakes/pegs on 09/28/2010 22:55:25 MDT Print View

Can someone recommend a very light tent stake? Thinking about purchasing a cuben fiber tarp this year and that would cut about 10 oz of weight and would like to lighten even more with lighter pegs.

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: tent stakes/pegs on 09/28/2010 23:02:16 MDT Print View

I use this combo:

One Vargo titanium nail peg @ 0.5 oz. good for pounding "starter holes" on hard / compacted ground -- plus appropriate number of titanium shepherd hook stakes @ 0.22oz. each.

Good for most everything except sandy beaches / deserts, snow, and "rock hard" surfaces.

Edited by ben2world on 09/28/2010 23:04:12 MDT.

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: tent stakes/pegs on 09/28/2010 23:14:01 MDT Print View

Leave them behind.

http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/ditch_your_stakes.html

I never take them to the beach or desert anymore.

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
Re: Re: tent stakes/pegs on 09/29/2010 07:34:26 MDT Print View

I carry the same combo as Ben- except I carry two of the nail pegs- these go to secure the two trekking pole ends, I use the shepherd ones to stake out the rest

if you go this route I'd advise getting the painted ones, or paint them yourself w/ fluorescent paint- titanium it seems is the perfect camouflage :)

Jim MacDiarmid
(jrmacd) - MLife
Re: tent stakes/pegs on 09/29/2010 08:23:34 MDT Print View

+1 on 2 Ti Nail or aluminum Easton type stake for the ridgeline plus the appropriate number of shepards hood stakes for the corner and side guyouts. I bring 8 shepards hook stakes on multi night trip in case I misplace one or two, and in case I encounter bad weather. That combo weighs 2.91 for me.

This article tests the holding power of various stakes.

Elizabeth Tracy
(mariposa) - M

Locale: Outside
Fluorescent paint on 10/01/2010 14:08:13 MDT Print View

I love the fluorescent paint idea.

There are lots of them on the market.

Any suggestions for a fluorescent paint that
1. Will not wear off titanium or aluminum, and
2. Is non-toxic.

- Elizabeth

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Fluorescent paint on 10/01/2010 14:15:10 MDT Print View

I never had good luck with fluorescent paint. I do use a piece of luminescent tape on my tent stakes so that I can see them at night.

--B.G.--

eric chan
(bearbreeder) - F
orange tape on 10/01/2010 14:20:04 MDT Print View

orange or reflective tape ... im sure it adds a gram or 2 ... so not for ULers ;)

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
plastikote on 10/01/2010 16:38:38 MDT Print View

I've used plastikote paint- won't last forever, but will last a couple of trips at least

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
MSR Groundhog stakes on 10/02/2010 00:23:59 MDT Print View

I've had it with skinny rod tent stakes. They can't hold well in a lot of soil types.

The best AND strongest stakes for the weight are MSR aluminum "Y" cross-section stakes.

It comes down to true functionality v.s. being a total gram weenie. Ti stakes? Don't make me laugh.

EDIT> I recant. The Vargo Ti Nail stakes would be a good choice for ULers.

(Oh dear me, I may have said something not PC in the UL world.) Well, deal with it.

I see Ti as useful in only a few areas of backpacking, such as stoves, or parts of stoves, where heat is a factor and aluminum can't be used. But cookware???? It's all a prestige thing as far as I can see with Ti pots, cups, and utensils. Hard anodized or ceramic coated aluminum cookware still transmits heat much more evenly than thin Ti cookware. And Lexan utensils and cups are far better for the tasks.

Now MAYBE a Ti knife blade, gun components, Corvette push rods....

But I digress on my digressions.

Edited by Danepacker on 07/31/2012 13:17:24 MDT.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: MSR Groundhog stakes on 10/02/2010 04:56:23 MDT Print View

> Ti stakes? Don't make me laugh.
Funny - those shepherds hook Ti stakes are what I use most of the time. Granted, they do not hold very well in the snow (or in sand), but otherwise, great.

> And Lexan utensils and cups are far better for the tasks.
Have to agree there.

> MAYBE a Ti knife blade,
Tried that. Lousy. Pathetic. Would not hold an edge.

Cheers

Mike S
(MikeyLXT) - F

Locale: Maryland
Re: Re: MSR Groundhog stakes on 10/02/2010 06:30:01 MDT Print View

I am not a true ULer so maybe that is the reason for my opinion.

MSR Groundhogs!. Pure functionality over an oz. of weight savings.

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
MSR needle stakes on 10/02/2010 08:29:43 MDT Print View

one alternative not mentioned is the MSR needle stakes- they are square shaped and hod well- they are also tough (very tough), red anodized aluminum so pretty hi-vis, and not terribly heavy @ .35 oz lifetime warranty to boot! :)

Bradford Rogers
(Mocs123) - MLife

Locale: Southeast Tennessee
Re: tent stakes/pegs on 10/02/2010 09:29:27 MDT Print View

It really just depends on where you do most of your hiking. That is why some people have had great luck with Ti shepherd hooks and others think they are a joke. Different soil types require different stakes. I am assuming that by your location that you do most of your hiking in the southeast? If so than shepherd hooks should work fine, in anything but snow or sand. I use Gossamer Gear shepherd hooks and Easton 6" Blue Nail stakes for my SpinnShelter and I have been in winds up to 45 mph in that combo, no mind you I did have to put rock on top of my stakes, but they still did the job.

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: Re: tent stakes/pegs on 10/02/2010 09:38:45 MDT Print View

"It really just depends on where you do most of your hiking.

Exactly! Pick the right tools for the task at hand. Different stake types for different types of ground.

The most helpful posts are those that state the options -- along with pros and cons.

Edited by ben2world on 10/02/2010 09:40:56 MDT.

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
stake material on 10/02/2010 09:55:01 MDT Print View

Eric, I'd suggest that in the interest of productive discussion you resist pontification and excessive opinion-slinging.

Your comments re ti and aluminum stakes seem to actually concern the material not at all. Y stakes work better than needle stakes in your application and local, perfectly understandable. I suspect that, ideology aside, some ti Groundhogs would suit you, and the elasticity of titanium might help them survive encounters with rocks (I've snapped the heads off a few Groundhogs).

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
Pontification, et al. on 10/02/2010 18:13:52 MDT Print View

My dearest David,

Point taken. I really should have put a smiley face after "Deal with it." to show that I was only semi-serious.

Yes, I confess, I have used shepherd's hook stakes in the '60s and '70s. And in the past they worked sometimes, maybe 35% of the time, and that was in Pennsylvania's woods. But that 65% failure rate got me to looking for better stakes. Whereupon I made my own from discarded aluminum arrow shafts and tip inserts. Better but not optimum.

And then I discovered MSR Groundhogs and never even winked at a rod stake again, Ti, aluminum or Unobtanium.

BTW, Did I mention I don't like Ti for tent stakes or utensils? :)

ROGER> Ti is not good for knife blades? Thanks for the warning as I was considering buying a lockblade Ti knife. I felt if it had the proper Rockwell hardness number it would be OK but perhaps it has properties that defeat even a good hardness tempering.

Edited by Danepacker on 10/02/2010 18:17:32 MDT.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Pontification, et al. on 10/02/2010 18:38:56 MDT Print View

Hi Eric

Yes, I have experimented with titanium alloys for knives. I tried putting a real edge on a bought Ti knife - failure. I tried putting a real edge on some 6Al4V alloy - failure.

I do think that a good Ti alloy could make a good butter knife for food, but not for serious cutting.

As for the other metals you mentioned - have you tried adamantium?

Cheers

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: Pontification and Imprimatur on 10/02/2010 21:34:41 MDT Print View

"And then I discovered MSR Groundhogs and never even winked at a rod stake again, Ti, aluminum or Unobtanium."

Speaking of unobtanium... I recently switched to Big Sky Ultra C aluminum stakes -- which come in 4" and 6" configurations. The 4" is actually lighter than a standard 6-in titanium shepherd hook stake while providing more "holding power". The 6" is just a tad heavier than a standard ti shepherd stake.

I've used these stakes for 5 camping nights thus far and like them even more than the ti shepherd stakes that I've been using for the last 6 years. Essentially comparable in weight but provide more "holding power". And easy to push in and pull out too.

Edited by ben2world on 10/02/2010 21:38:35 MDT.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Stakes on 10/02/2010 23:00:28 MDT Print View

Some of my favorites. I like to carry a couple kinds. Sometimes you can use one type to get a hole started for the other. If you lose one, you can whittle one from a branch and use it in a less critical spot.


Won't hold the tent up, but geez....
T bone!

Left to right:

"V" style aluminum by The North Face

"Y" style aluminum by GoLite. Similar to the MSR Ground Hog, one of the toughest and best holding for the weight.

"E" style titanium, retains line even when rotated. They are sold on eBay by alfresco_gear.

Shepherd's hook titanium

Aluminum needle. I haven't used this style much. I'm told they break easily.

Easton tubular aluminum. Tough, holds well, some have trouble with the heads coming off.

Tent stakes

I want to try some of the nail style titanium pegs.


Side note:

The "e" stakes came in this twist-adjustable case. It weighs 0.9oz/25g, which is about the same as 4 of the stakes, but it does make for a neat package. For the lightest carry option, I roll them up in a small square of Tyvek and a rubber band. That protects my other gear from punctures and dirt.

Twist case

Twist case

Edited by dwambaugh on 10/02/2010 23:07:35 MDT.