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poncho/tarp
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Dwight Shackelford
(zydeholic) - F

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
poncho/tarp on 08/04/2006 09:16:28 MDT Print View

While waiting for my machine to get fixed, I decided to cut out some fabric for some other projects. I got a poncho pattern from somewhere, with extra length to use to cover a backpack.

I'm vaguely wanting to use this as a possible tarp too, but I'll have to see how it goes.

The pattern calls for snaps on the edge when worn as a poncho. I'm thinking velcro instead. Any feedback on the wisdom of that?

Dwight

Vick Hines
(vickrhines) - F

Locale: Central Texas
Re: poncho/tarp on 08/04/2006 11:40:09 MDT Print View

Velcro has the unfortunate habit of clinging to things you might rather it didn't. I use sew-on snaps, myself.

If you are rolling your own poncho/tarp, you might be interested in this method of handling the problem of the lines: The photos show square reinforcements that evert to form pouches to hold the guy lines. This is most useful when hammock camping since you always need guy lines. It is less handy for regular tarping if you use a leanto or 1/2 pyramid since one side is on the ground and can be staked without guy lines.
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Edited by vickrhines on 08/04/2006 11:44:01 MDT.

Sam Haraldson
(sharalds) - MLife

Locale: Gallatin Range
Slick on 08/05/2006 11:27:52 MDT Print View

That is a very slick solution to the ever-present guy-line storage annoyance.

Vick Hines
(vickrhines) - F

Locale: Central Texas
Re: Slick on 08/05/2006 19:22:14 MDT Print View

Yep, it works fine if you always need guy lines - as you do when covering a hammock. For a leanto or 1/2 pyramid where one side of the tarp is staked directly to the ground, the guy lines are superfluous, but it doesn't hurt to have them there.

Dwight Shackelford
(zydeholic) - F

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Clever idea on 08/05/2006 21:31:06 MDT Print View

Thanks Vic. That's pretty slick.

I was thinking today about your comment about Velcro sticking to all sorts of things you didn't want it to stick to.

I began thinking of doing a velcro flap.

Sew two small lengths of hook and loop to a piece of nylon, so you have flap that can close over on itself. Sew the hook side to the poncho. On the mating half, do the exact opposite, so when the flaps are all open, they'll mate and stick. When done, close them on themselves and they don't catch anything.

But then you have to worry about getting all those flaps open in a downpour.

Maybe I just need to get comfortable with a snap. Just seems like they'll pull out too easy if you're not careful.

Dwight

Dwight Shackelford
(zydeholic) - F

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
sew on snaps on 08/05/2006 21:31:42 MDT Print View

Where do you get these?

Al Shaver
(Al_T.Tude) - F - M

Locale: High Sierra and CA Central Coast
Snaps on 08/05/2006 23:44:23 MDT Print View

Sew on snaps are surprisingly strong and durable. Make sure you get ones that are large enough to operate by headlamp light with cold, wet fingernails. You'll find a nice variety of sizes at any fabric store. Also may be found in the sewing section of your local grocery or drug store.

Vick Hines
(vickrhines) - F

Locale: Central Texas
Re: Snaps on 08/06/2006 09:23:04 MDT Print View

Al is dead on. Sew-on snaps are extremely durable. And size matters. I use the largest I can find for my poncho/cape because the angle of pull can come from any direction and small snaps come undone.

Dwight Shackelford
(zydeholic) - F

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
sew on snaps - attaching on 08/07/2006 06:31:20 MDT Print View

At first I thought these might have a small square of material attached, and you just sew the material down.

But from looking at drawings in the web, and they are not too details drawings, it looks like there are holes around the outsides of the snaps that you use to sew the snap down. Is that right?

Vick Hines
(vickrhines) - F

Locale: Central Texas
Re: sew on snaps - attaching on 08/07/2006 10:30:27 MDT Print View

Ike,
Sew on snaps are just like buttons; they have holes along the edges andyou just take a needle and thread and whip them on.

BTW, they make plastic sew-ons, but they are useless. The largest metal ones are reasonably light and actually work. If you have button-hole capacity on your sewing maching, you can also use buttons. They are low tech, but work just fine. Orient the button holes along the hem - not across it.

Dwight Shackelford
(zydeholic) - F

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Ike on 08/07/2006 11:31:14 MDT Print View

My middle name is also David. I was born on 1/20/53.

See if you can connect the dots.

Duh-wite

Vick Hines
(vickrhines) - F

Locale: Central Texas
Re: Ike on 08/07/2006 15:01:20 MDT Print View

Not much of a leap with that birthday.

Dwight Shackelford
(zydeholic) - F

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Leap year on 08/07/2006 18:21:15 MDT Print View

Every four years I get a jackass for my birthday, regardless of party.

I met some poor guy once, born in October of 1952. Name was Dwight Adlai something-or-other. Now that is cruel.

Dwight Shackelford
(zydeholic) - F

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
sew on snaps on 08/07/2006 18:28:58 MDT Print View

I'll try the metal ones then. I hate sewing buttons by hand though. I do have a button foot for my machine, but I want to be really careful when trying to sew a metal object.

So, with these things, there's no need for any holes through the tarp, except for the thread holes?

Just got my newest shipment from Quest. 3 layer WPB for my bivy, replacement cordura for the straps I screwed to hell on this G4 bag, and some extra to make some larger waist belt pads.

Figure I'll make a first run on the Meteor bivy with this cheap chocolate stuff I bought for the bottom, and the cheap ripstop I got for the top. Then, if its too claustrophic, I'll nudge things a bit wider when I use the expensive spread.

Vick Hines
(vickrhines) - F

Locale: Central Texas
Re: Leap year on 08/07/2006 20:07:16 MDT Print View

Jackass for birthday. Yeah, the rest of us feel like we've been getting one got one, too. Every 4 years.

My son-in-law was presented with a donkey for his birthday about 3 years ago. It keeps trying to kill him.

Vick Hines
(vickrhines) - F

Locale: Central Texas
Re: sew on snaps on 08/07/2006 20:10:10 MDT Print View

Holes through fabric> Nope, only the stitching - but you want to backup the snap on silnylon with something more substantial unless the snap is on the hem. The stitching and backup will hold silicone sealant very well. No leak problems .. and unless you are making a cape, the snaps will all be on the hem.

RE the rest> prototypes are good.

Linsey Budden
(lollygag)

Locale: pugetropolis
Vick's sewing tips on 08/16/2006 01:36:49 MDT Print View

Vick, you have the best sewing tips! When I made rain poncho/tarps last weekend, I incorporated guyline pouches. Inspired by military ponchos, I would like to be able to snap two together to make one big shelter. Do you think sew on snaps would handle this application or do you have a better suggestion?

Vick Hines
(vickrhines) - F

Locale: Central Texas
Re: Mating ponchos on 08/16/2006 09:39:35 MDT Print View

I have not found a good way to put two ponchos together. If anyone has an idea they have used and that works well, please advise.

And please, idle speculation is a waste of everyone's time.

The traditional technique for joining army shelter halves was a line of snaps with a generous flap over the seam. I have seen zipped ponchos that try to do the same thing. I have not done either successfully using UL fabrics. I would like to know if anyone has.