Recipe Re-Do's
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Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Recipe Re-Do's on 09/08/2010 15:01:58 MDT Print View

Thanks to the monthly issues of an unnamed magazine I often re-do recipes featured in it. I can't help it :D

This month I took on a one pot pasta dish and a no-cook couscous salad.

Spicy Tuna Pasta

http://www.trailcooking.com/recipes/spicy-tuna-linguine
Spicy Tuna Linguine

Ingredients

* 8 oz linguine pasta
* 1⁄2 t granulated garlic
* 1⁄4 t red pepper flakes
* 1⁄4 t ground black pepper
* 1⁄4 t dried oregano
* 2 T extra virgin olive oil (2 packets)
* 3 oz albacore tuna pouch
* 2 T dry bread crumbs
* 2 T shelf stable Parmesan cheese

At home:
Break the pasta in half and pack in a sandwich bag. In a snack size bag pack the seasoning blend. In a second snack bag combine the bread crumbs and cheese. Tuck in the oil packets and tuna pouch.

In camp:
Add the oil to the snack bag with the seasoning, seal the bag and gently massage the bag to combine. Let sit while you prepare the pasta.
Bring 4 cups water to a boil, add in the pasta and cook for time on package, around 9 minutes. Reserve a little of the pasta water, drain off the rest.
Toss the pasta with the tuna and flavored oil, toss again with the breadcrumb mixture. Add reserved water as needed to coat the pasta.

Notes:
This recipe is one of our "Recipe Re-Do's". The original recipe called for a pouch of tuna in oil. While I often use small cans of tuna packed in olive oil I have never come across it in pouches. If any of our readers have found this please let us know. Albacore pouches though are easy to find, nearly all stores carry them.

Instead of heating up the oil and spices at the end in the pot we let them infuse while the pasta cooked. To save a dirty pot by all means after cooking the pasta you can toss everything together in a new gallon size freezer bag.

We added in bread crumbs and Parmesan cheese at the end give the pasta a great coating and 'finish' the meal. We used plain, Italian flavor would also be great: http://www.progressofoods.com/?View=OurProducts_Foods

Nutritional stats per serving, recipe makes two servings (based on products we used):
637 calories, 19.5 grams fat, 26 grams protein, 4.5 grams fiber.


Photobucket

http://www.trailcooking.com/recipes/no-cook-chicken-cranberry-couscous-salad
No-Cook Chicken Cranberry Couscous Salad

Ingredients:
* 1 c couscous
* 1⁄2 c dried cranberries
* 1⁄4 c roasted sunflower seeds
* 7 oz pouch chicken breast
* 1 pkt shelf stable salad dressing
* 1 1⁄4 c cold water

At home:
Pack the couscous and cranberries in a quart freezer bag. Put the sunflower seeds in a small bag and tuck with the chicken and dressing packets.

In camp:
Add 1 1/4 cups cool water to the bag, sealing tightly. Let sit for about 30 minutes or until fully rehydrated. Fluff up, stir in the chicken, dressing and sunflower seeds.

Notes:
This is one of our "recipe re-do's" gleaned. The original recipe called for:
A 'box of couscous', which isn't overly helpful as couscous comes in boxes ranging from 7 to 16 ounces! We dialed in what would serve 2. The 1 cup equals a shy 7 ounces weighed.

Olive oil - the recipe doesn't need it with the dressing and we figured how much dressing as well works.

An extended sit time of nearly 24 hours - couscous rehydrates in 30 minutes or less, no reason to risk food poisoning! If in very cold temperatures you will want to consider using warm water (if in winter, in the snow for example). You can also make this a warm meal by all means, using warm water and letting sit for 15 minutes, then proceeding.

We used a Sesame Asian dressing but you can use anything that sounds good - you will want a shelf stable packet of about 1 1/2 ounces or 3 Tbsp worth. See here for a good selection:
http://www.packitgourmet.com/Salad-Dressings-c53.html

Nutritional Stats per serving, makes 2 servings total (Based on what we used): 700 calories, 13 grams fat, 5 grams fiber, 54.5 grams protein, 725 mg sodium

Enjoy!

Edited by sarbar on 09/08/2010 15:03:37 MDT.

brent driggers
(cadyak) - MLife

Locale: southwest georgia
It was so good! on 09/14/2010 14:40:37 MDT Print View

I made the couscous for my wife and I and it turned out great.
I could eat it every day. I always carry couscous because it packs so well and adapts to any shape.
Thanks for posting the recipe. The dressing really made it.

Michael Ray
(topshot) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
Re: tuna pouch w/ oil on 09/14/2010 14:52:02 MDT Print View

> The original recipe called for a pouch of tuna in oil. While I often use small cans of tuna packed in olive oil I have never come across it in pouches. If any of our readers have found this please let us know.

My local Walmart has Starkist 2.6 oz pouches of chunk light tuna with sunflower oil. Not sure why they don't use olive like the cans.

Joe Clement
(skinewmexico) - MLife

Locale: Southwest
Recipe Re-Do's on 09/14/2010 15:41:34 MDT Print View

Could the spicy tuna be an FBC meal?

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: Recipe Re-Do's on 09/14/2010 17:18:09 MDT Print View

Joe...I think it could work FBC with precooked and dryed pasta :-)

Michael - awesome! Will look! Bet sunflower is cheaper for them than olive. The canned version with a pop-top lid has olive (though I have also seen it with other oils).

I love couscous too! So does Kirk - so more salads (or shall I say...no cook couscous!) will be coming :-)

Michael Ray
(topshot) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
Re: couscous on 09/14/2010 18:04:46 MDT Print View

I haven't acquired the "taste" for its texture yet. I have fiddled with a few of your recipes and the grainy feel always turns me off. They taste ok - it's just a psychological thing I guess.

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: couscous on 09/14/2010 20:33:37 MDT Print View

Couscous is definitely one of those 'love it or hate it' things. You might try Near East brand though - I have found it to have an extremely better texture than many other brands. And don't get whole wheat either.

Laurie Ann March
(Laurie_Ann) - F

Locale: Ontario, Canada
couscous on 09/15/2010 08:13:45 MDT Print View

If you don't like Moroccan couscous which is the more popular kind of couscous then try Israeli couscous also known as pearl couscous. It feels more like pasta in the mouth and doesn't have the grainy.

Edited by Laurie_Ann on 09/15/2010 08:14:29 MDT.

brent driggers
(cadyak) - MLife

Locale: southwest georgia
couscous on 09/15/2010 08:41:36 MDT Print View

The texture to me is the best part of couscous. It is so easy to grab a big spoonful of it. I normally take a couple of foil packets of chicken, sundried tomatoes and chicken boullion cubes. Another tasty recipe is curry style with dried carrots and golden raisins. Cooking good food is one of the more fun aspects of camping for me. Ill carry a little extra weight to add to the fun and taste of meals.

Edited by cadyak on 09/15/2010 08:42:50 MDT.

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: couscous on 09/15/2010 08:59:43 MDT Print View

Just be forewarned that Israeli (Pearl) Couscous isn't instant like normal couscous found on the shelves here in the US. I use it in soups and pilafs at home but on trail I don't.

Dicentra OPW
(dicentra) - F

Locale: PNW
Pearl Couscous on 09/15/2010 10:41:29 MDT Print View

I love the texture of pearl couscous! You can find it in the bulk bins fairly often. Trader Joes has a cool mix of grains that has it with red quinoa and a bunch of other stuff.

Not sure the pearl couscous it would work for a no-cook meal though. Might have to test that. :)