Subscribe Contribute Advertise Facebook Twitter Instagram Forums Newsletter
Fabrics and weight capacities...
Display Avatars Sort By:
Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Fabrics and weight capacities... on 08/23/2010 13:06:06 MDT Print View

Is there a chart someplace that lists common outdoor fabrics and how much weight they can hold when used to make a gathered end hammock?

I am interested in the lightest amount of material to hold my weight, and to see how light i can go on hammocks for my friends.

-Tim

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Fabrics and weight capacities... on 08/23/2010 15:16:14 MDT Print View

> lightest amount of material to hold my weight,

Don't sneeze or hiccup!

Cheers

Chris Peichel
(momo)

Locale: Eureka
fabrics and weight limits on 08/23/2010 18:11:22 MDT Print View

Tim,
look on warbonnetoutdoors.com, on the page for his traveller hammocks he lists fabric options and the weight limits for those fabrics. He also lists the 'flatness' weight limit (max weight for that fabric and still get a good diagonal flat lay).

Good luck...first time I hung my hammock (myog 1.1oz ripstop), I hung it close to the ground with no rocks or anything dangerous underneath. I was a little nervous seeing as how I made the hammock, whoopie slings and stitched the tree straps. I am now convinced this set up is plenty strong for me. Nylon is amazingly strong.

Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Re: Re: Fabrics and weight capacities... on 08/24/2010 06:29:57 MDT Print View

Roger,

Obviously i am looking for the lightest material to safely and reliably hold my weight, not just until i move. Thanx for the helpful post! :)

Sat in a single layer 1.1 today and it didn't shred, but i wouldn't want to take it as my only shelter. I am too big for such a light fabric and the stretch is horrible. I guess i'll need to try a single layer 1.5 as i use a double layer 1.5 now and it could hold 2 of me easy, so bomber.

-Tim

Edited by MarshLaw303 on 08/24/2010 12:29:30 MDT.

Paul Gibson
(pgibson) - F

Locale: SW Idaho
I am with Chris on 08/24/2010 19:02:50 MDT Print View

Warbonnet's guide lines are good. I have had over 400 pounds in a single 1.1 and trust it to hold but the stretch makes it so far uncomfortable for even sitting in after a while that it would not even be an option for sleeping in. Warbonnet guy has done a lot of work and has a lot of customers to back up his max flatness (ie. not over stretched to take away from comfort) rating. But 1.1 and even 0.9 should hold you up.

Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Re: I am with Chris on 08/24/2010 20:47:23 MDT Print View

my only issue with his chart is that i don't know what 1.7oz nylon is. 1.1 i am very familiar with, 1.9 is a standard but i have never seen 1.7 anywhere but on his site. BWDD has 1.5 which is also new to me. I would like to go with a single layer of 1.5, 1.7 or 1.9 but his chart suggests it will stretch too much. I don't really want a >32oz hammock, it makes me sad

-Tim

>> Bender <<
(Bender) - MLife

Locale: NEO
Re: Re: Re: Fabrics and weight capacities... on 08/24/2010 21:13:29 MDT Print View

Tim what about a double layer .9-1.1 oz nylon?

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: Fabrics and weight capacities... on 08/24/2010 22:33:19 MDT Print View

I've got one made out of 1.9, too heavy duty. I have one out of 1.1. Seems a little too thin for my 210 lb self, though it does hold my weight. Sure it would be fine. Though with my luck I would find out otherwise at o crack thirty. Have some 1.5 ordered from BWDD that should be here in a day or two. I didn't want to go with a double layer. Hoping that the 1.5 will be the sweet spot.

Edited by kthompson on 08/24/2010 22:34:40 MDT.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Re: Fabrics and weight capacities... on 08/25/2010 05:05:12 MDT Print View

Hi Tim

> Obviously i am looking for the lightest material to safely and reliably hold my
> weight, not just until i move. Thanx for the helpful post! :)

Oh, I try ... my wife says sometimes I am very trying ...

But more seriously, you do have to plan for dynamic loads, which could require a factor of over 3x, and one also needs to make some 'safety' allowance for wear and tear. It all adds up.

That said, nylon *does* have a large stretch factor, so it is OK to see a bit of stretch under load. The old BS3104 UK Standard for nylon climbing ropes specified that the rope must handle a 60% stretch before breaking. And there were a few times we did see a bit of a bungee cord effect when someone peeled. Mind you, the general rule was to retire a rope which had experienced a significant leader fall.

Cheers

Michael Ray
(topshot) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
Re: Why not cuben? on 08/25/2010 07:06:27 MDT Print View

Tim,
Why aren't you considering cuben like Bill Fornshell or Lawson Kline? I'd assume you could use a heavier weight than they have (especially Bill) and still be lighter than sil.

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife

Locale: Behind the Redwood Curtain
Re: Why not cuben? on 08/25/2010 07:08:57 MDT Print View

I thought Lawson had given up on cuben since the failure of his prototype? Most hammocks are made of a breathable material also. Never seen or heard of one made of silnylon, sounds clammy.

Michael Ray
(topshot) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
Re: Re: Why not cuben? on 08/25/2010 07:30:05 MDT Print View

Maybe. He wrote, "I have tested it to 450lbs and the only failure was when the knot slipped on the paracord." That doesn't sound like an issue with the cuben, just the attachment he used.

Nathan Baker
(Slvravn) - MLife

Locale: East Coast - Mid Atlantic
Re: Re: Re: Why not cuben? on 08/25/2010 07:50:44 MDT Print View

There was an actual fabric failure on one of the prototype hammocks where it split into 2 pieces. You can read about it here: Cuben hammock

Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Re: Re: Re: Re: Why not cuben? on 08/25/2010 08:45:02 MDT Print View

i am not considering cuben for a few reasons...

1) Cost, i am cheap plain and simple, i don't even own one of my own cuben quilts cause i am too cheap.

2) Breathability. I am a big guy who can move a lot of moisture so i want the material to breathe.

3) After seeing Lawson's prototype fail (under dynamic stress) I am not sure i want to find out the hard way that my new $300 hammock works better as a bivy(with a large bottom entrance hole).

I am not looking to make hammocks for enLIGTened equipment, just for fun. I have used one a few nights now and being the gear nerd i am i am always trying to find a better way to make something so i can't leave it alone.

My weight has never been such a limiting factor in how light my gear can be before. I have easily done sub 5 in the past just to see if i could. But with a hammock i am not sure i can even stay sub 8 because i require such a robust hammock due to my hugeness and the tarp needs to be much bigger than i can use on the ground to feel the same level of protection.

I am just trying to find the right balance between weight and capacity.

Ken, i think you will love the 1.5oz BWDD stuff. I really want to try to make a single layer from it. I currently have a double layer in the material. I also want to make some hiking pants and shirts from it as it seems about perfect for that as well. I just wish i could find a free pattern for a gi online. I think a gi top and 3/4 gi pants (or fisherman's pants) would be about perfect for hiking in (made from a light nylon, not a heavy cotton) They would also make a great canoe pant as they would be longer than shorts, but allow much more air up your leg than pants. I need more length as i always burn bad while out fishing from my canoe, which is the main reason i canoe more than hike these days, the smallmouth! Hard to have a good hike/smallmouth trip where its easy to have a great canoe/smallmouth trip. At least where i have been going.

-Tim

Javan Dempsey
(jdempsey)

Locale: The-Stateless-Society
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Why not cuben? on 08/28/2010 22:22:49 MDT Print View

Tim did you see my post on fisherman's shorts I made from RS?


Here's a link to a pattern that's very similar to what I used: http://boom.bolenat.com/page.asp?page=make_fish


Those are larger than mine by a bit, just shorten the legs to make them 3/4. Also, I recommend adding a gusset in the crotch, because I blew the seam about 3 times in my original pair.

Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Why not cuben? on 08/28/2010 23:39:48 MDT Print View

I have seen that pattern and will most likely modify it to make it big enough, but with short legs. I also plan to add a full length gusset like the traditional pants have. I am actually more interested in the gi, but haven't found a pattern that was for a real one and not a costume.

-Tim

Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Re: Fabrics and weight capacities... on 09/22/2010 16:17:30 MDT Print View

So in my quest for a lighter hammock for a big man i got an idea...

It is very clear that i will need a double layer of 1.5-1.9oz ripstop to comfortably (minimal stretch) hold me. My idea is to make a double layer that is 36-40" wide with 1.1 (or 1.5-1.9oz) wings that will be single layer. The double layer bed should hold most of the weight with the wings keeping me inside and allowing me to lay out flat. I am think something like the Jerry5 design.

Any obvious weaknesses to this idea i am missing?

-Tim

Chris Peichel
(momo)

Locale: Eureka
Fabrics and weight capacities on 09/22/2010 17:32:59 MDT Print View

Tim,
This is just my opinion, I am no expert. I have done a fair amount of sewing with the gear I have made for myself.

My concern is the stitching between the pieces.

First I would be concerned with the seam pulling apart. I can pull apart a seam in nylon (1.1 to 1.9) by hand, not that the thread is breaking but the fabric fibers will pull out or tear. I cannot, however pull apart the same size piece of nylon that has not been sewn.

Second I would think that a seam would not stretch as much as the fabric around it, causing a hard ridge that could be uncomfortable.

Just my opinion...but...I would consider the ratio of pack weight to body weight and make the hammock you think will not only hold you, but one that won't keep you up because you are worried it will fail.

Good luck, and we want to see pics when it's done!

Joe L
(heyyou) - MLife

Locale: Cutting brush off of the Arizona Tr
Tim's camping equipment on 09/22/2010 17:56:23 MDT Print View

IIRC, Tim strives to have made all of the fabric-based camping gear that he carries.

Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Re: Tim's camping equipment on 09/22/2010 19:42:26 MDT Print View

I think you may be correct about the seam not stretching with the fabric. You may also be correct about the seam being uncomfortable. If the 2 layer bed is 40" wide most of me will be on that though. The seams shouldn't be under much stress as they will be running in line with the stress and not against it. My weight will be held by the 2 layer piece so the edges should function similar to the extra fabric added to the standard Jerry5 or WBBB hammocks. I am not saying you are wrong, just that in my mind i don't see it going that way. But that is why i posted first to get a double check on that crazy brain of mine.

And yes, i make nearly every piece of equipment i use, or have it made by friends with more skills than i.

-Tim