Forum Index » General Lightweight Backpacking Discussion » Freezer Bag Boiling


Display Avatars Sort By:
Kris Sherwood
(Tuskadero) - F

Locale: Washington State
Freezer Bag Boiling on 08/19/2010 10:09:35 MDT Print View

I want to start doing my own freeze dried food as well as re-package any packed freeze dried food in to my own bags.

I want to make sure I find the correct zip lock bags that can handle boiling water and not melt or burn. Can anyone tell me what bags are good to use and what are not?

Thanks!
Kris

Eric Palumbo
(palumbo) - F

Locale: Rocky Mountains
Re: Freezer Bag Boiling on 08/19/2010 10:20:50 MDT Print View

I just started experimenting with FBC and used a the Ziploc Freezerbag with the SmartZip http://www.ziploc.com/Products/Pages/FreezerBagsSmartZipSeal.aspx?SizeName=Pint successfully.

Chris W
(simplespirit) - MLife

Locale: WNC
Re: Freezer Bag Boiling on 08/19/2010 10:41:12 MDT Print View

I've found only Ziploc freezer bags to work reliably. Also, note that you don't need boiling water for rehydrating. It just needs to be hot.

Robert Carver
(Rcarver) - MLife

Locale: Southeast TN
Re: Freezer Bag Boiling on 08/19/2010 13:00:36 MDT Print View

I just use the Ziploc brand. The pint size will hold a two serving Mountain House meal.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Freezer Bag Boiling on 08/19/2010 13:11:04 MDT Print View

I got some generic quart-size freezer bags at wally world.

--B.G.--

Michael Ray
(topshot) - MLife

Locale: Midwest
Re: Freezer Bag Boiling on 08/19/2010 14:46:47 MDT Print View

I'm using Walmart's freezer bags. I learned from my recent hiking partner that Subway sandwich bags will even work.

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: Freezer Bag Boiling on 08/19/2010 15:26:17 MDT Print View

I use name brand ones due to them being produced in the US (might as well support our economy if I can!) and I like the bags as well.

But as pointed out you do not need boiling water - hot is fine. I bring the water to a boil to purify the water and then let it sit for a minute or so while I putter getting my bag in the cozy, etc and then add the water.

Keep sporks and forks out and you are good to go.

Michael Cockrell
(CAL-EE-FOR-NIA) - F

Locale: Central Valley, Lodi-Stockton, CA
Boil in bags on 08/19/2010 15:53:44 MDT Print View

Most grocery stores carry "boil/steam in bag" items. You'll find them near the turkey cooking bags where the other type of bags are racked.

These are made to deal with high temps. You'll be saved from the threat of "plastic bleed" chemicals in your food. Their also more sturdy and work well in cozy, or sitting in a bowl.

I also use chopsticks to eat from. You can reach farther down and less clean up.

If you use wood/bamboo "throw-aways", then they can be used for fires after dinner, or just a bio-degradable item, like the other tree/brush debris.

boil in bag

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Boil in bags and chopsticks on 08/19/2010 16:01:16 MDT Print View

"If you use wood/bamboo "throw-aways", then they can be used for fires after dinner, or just a bio-degradable item, like the other tree/brush debris."

Actually, you can get multiple uses out of them by using them as tent pegs.

--B.G.--

Chris W
(simplespirit) - MLife

Locale: WNC
Re: Re: Boil in bags and chopsticks on 08/19/2010 16:37:42 MDT Print View

Or just reuse them as chopsticks....

Michael Cockrell
(CAL-EE-FOR-NIA) - F

Locale: Central Valley, Lodi-Stockton, CA
Snow Peak on 08/19/2010 17:07:41 MDT Print View

I normally use my Compact Snow Peak Chopsticks. They clean easy.

Harder to get a "safe" cleaning of anything woodwise. So, if on a 1-2 adventure, or did not want to make time to clean, I use "throw-away" sticks.

It is also kind of "quaint?" to be sitting there with your "sticks" and eating, surrounded by wilderness.

Stephen Adams
(stevemkedcom) - MLife

Locale: Northwest
Freeze dried on 08/19/2010 17:24:49 MDT Print View

Is there any advantage to repackaging pre-packaged freeze dried? The packages they come in seem kind of bulky and might weigh more than zip lock?

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Freeze dried on 08/19/2010 17:32:20 MDT Print View

Absolutely.

Your typical MH freeze-dried meal is sealed in plastic and foil where it will "keep" on the shelf for a couple of years. If you need to keep it that long, then you better keep it in its packaging. But when it gets within a few days of when you depart on your trip, you might want to repackage it to save the weight and bulk. However, you would not want to do that if your trip gets postponed for months. The taste and consistency will degrade.

--B.G.--

Robert Carver
(Rcarver) - MLife

Locale: Southeast TN
Re: Freeze dried on 08/19/2010 19:05:20 MDT Print View

+1 for repacking freeze dried meals.

Two meals repacked in freezer bags take up the same space as one meal in it's original package. Plus the less space it takes up after you have eaten the meal.

I've even had the original package poke holes in my food storage bag before.

Vick Hines
(vickrhines) - F

Locale: Central Texas
Re: Freezer Bag Boiling on 08/20/2010 20:40:38 MDT Print View

It's sort of a sliding scale. Sandwich ziploc bags are light, but get really soft when filled with hot water and require the support of something like a fitted cozy. Hard bits such as noodles can poke holes in them through rough handling or mashing of the food bag. Freezer ziplocs handle boiling water just fine and don't get holes. The storage grade is intermediate. It works much better than sandwich bags and not as well as freezer bags. Boil-in bags and some of the other things suggested above also work fine. Another option is to same the zip-closed bags for nuts (Blue Diamond is one brand), Splenda sweetener, and other food products. They are a bit heavier than ziploc freezer bags, but they are larger and do the job well. They may have fewer plasticizers to get into the food.
Good closures keep animal-attracting odors down. Repackaging commercial backpacking meals is a great idea, but should be done close to the trip to avoid oxidation.

Stephen Adams
(stevemkedcom) - MLife

Locale: Northwest
Freezer bag boiling on 08/30/2010 15:37:40 MDT Print View

Thanks for the tip
I just repackaged all my freeze dried into zip lock freezer bags for a 4 days/3 night trip in a couple of days. Not only did it cut down on the space required I also saved 6oz!!
Now i can take a cup of Vodka some Vermouth and olives for a martini after a long day hiking.
I think those little packets they put in there to absorb moisture were half the weight savings.