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Where did I see that?
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Dwight Shackelford
(zydeholic) - F

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Where did I see that? on 07/21/2006 12:30:39 MDT Print View

I saw a website where they used the ground cloth as the backpack. Ground cloth had straps on it, things were put in it, it was folded up, strapped up tight, and off they went.

Anyone know what that website is?

Dwight

cary bertoncini
(cbert) - F

Locale: N. California
moonbow gearskin? on 07/21/2006 12:34:31 MDT Print View

http://www.moonbowgear.com/1trailgear/1Custom%20packs/Gearskins/gearskin.html

Al Shaver
(Al_T.Tude) - F - M

Locale: High Sierra and CA Central Coast
Packin' With The Clan on 07/25/2006 18:31:16 MDT Print View

Definitely an interesting idea. To see the concept in action watch the opening scenes in "Rob Roy" as Liam Neeson and his clan transition from hiking to camping to bedding down with their wool cloaks held in place with a single broach.
HOOT MON! Manly men tossin' the caber, gettin' all sweaty, wooin' the lasses, all while wearin' a skirt and no briefs! ACH!

Vick Hines
(vickrhines) - F

Locale: Central Texas
Re: Packin' With The Clan on 07/26/2006 09:20:18 MDT Print View

The story is told of a clan leader who was demoted for patting up a "pillow" of snow when bivouacing with his raiding party. His men thought he was getting soft.

Dwight Shackelford
(zydeholic) - F

Locale: San Francisco Bay Area
Ultra light kilt? on 07/26/2006 14:32:57 MDT Print View

who here will wear the ultralight kilt? Perhaps Cuben fiber?

J R
(RavenUL) - F
Re: Ultra light kilt? on 07/26/2006 15:18:07 MDT Print View

I often wear a kilt while hiking, and have a silnylon "rain kilt".... but cuben seems to be a bit too transparent to go wearing "regimental"

Bill Fornshell
(bfornshell) - MLife

Locale: Southern Texas
SUL Kilt on 07/26/2006 15:50:13 MDT Print View

I use silk that is 0.57oz a sq yard. Almost as light weight as my Cuben. The silk come in white but can be dyed easy. You can buy silk dyed in some that weighs 1.02 oz a sq yard.

I made a "Great Kilt" but it turned out heavier than I would wear on a hike. I also made just the skirt style kilt out of some of the same material as the Great Kilt - Black Watch - Plaid that is light enough to wear as a hiking Kilt.

A Silk Kilt would be much more comfortable than a Cuben Kilt but I think the bugs would be more than I would want to fool with.

I might think about a Silk Kilt for my "Crazy Light" gear list.

Brian James
(bjamesd) - F

Locale: South Coast of BC
Kilt on 07/26/2006 17:04:44 MDT Print View

I've been dreaming of a hiking kilt for a long time. It's hard to imagine anything more breathable... and 'everything' gets a chance to breathe. What a perfect garment for hot muggy walking.

I have had a garded suspicion that Kilts will come into vogue amongst thru-hikers and ULers one of these days.

You heard it here first!

Brian

J R
(RavenUL) - F
Re: Kilt on 07/26/2006 17:38:51 MDT Print View

Sportkilt.com sells a very basic kilt made up in their "PCT Tartan". So popular it sold out faster than they can make them.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Kilt on 07/27/2006 10:48:50 MDT Print View

Utilikilts have been Seattle fashion for years. We do prefer that the kilters walk in the end of the line going uphill.

http://www.utilikilts.com/

Brian James
(bjamesd) - F

Locale: South Coast of BC
Kilt on 07/27/2006 12:03:00 MDT Print View

I'd seen the Utilikilts before (I'm a Vancouverite) but only at our *BEEP* pride parade. Being from the prairies and not knowing any better, I assumed that it was a *BEEP* fashion or bear fashion. Can anyone comment authoritatively? Apologies to anyone of whose culture I have been ignorant.

That sport kilt looks great! Thanks for the link.

Brian

J R
(RavenUL) - F
Re: Kilt on 07/27/2006 13:08:12 MDT Print View

Im not sure what "bear fashion" is (unless you mean "Bear Kilts" which is based in Vancouver)... but kilts are definatly NOT "*BEEP* fashion" (whatever that is).

Many people wear them for the comfort (ease of movement/breathability/lack of fabric rubbing on certain "parts"). Many people wear them as a show of pride in heritage (either as Scots or by wearing the many state and national tartans designed for the wear of anyone). Many wear them as a means to self expression. Many wear them on the numerous Kilt/tartan/Scot/Irish holidays out there (St Patricks day is a big one).

Even if its not a true kilt, the wearing of unbifucated garments by men is by no means limited to Scotland. The rigid structure of "mean wear pants" is pretty much a Rennesance european convention. The common practice in many countries is for men to wear a wrapped peice of cloth around their waists. This cloth is worn in many different ways depending on culture, but everyone from ancient Egyptians, to classical Greeks, to Chinese emperors, to samurai, to the Iroquois, Cherokee and Hopi, to many modern day Polynesians, Indonesians, and Africans. All wore/wear some type of "skirt" as their daily or cerimonial dress.

I dont know if thats "authoritative", but its certainly my take on the subject.

"A man in a kilt is a man and a half."
~ Sir Colin Campbell, Brigadier-General
The Queen's 93rd 'Sutherland' Highlanders

Brian James
(bjamesd) - F

Locale: South Coast of BC
Kilt on 07/27/2006 14:45:36 MDT Print View

I in no way meant to imply that all kilts are or could be simply a *BEEP* fashion trend.

I meant specifically the Utilikilts or Carpenter's kilts that I had seen at the vancouver *BEEP* parade some years back when I went with my girlfriend. There were large groups of men all walking together and wearing that exact style of kilt: being naive I have wondered ever since if wearing such a garment would send an incorrect "signal" to a group I don't know anything about. Which is why I asked. :)

Brian

Scott Ashdown
(waterloggedwellies) - F

Locale: United Kingdom
Re: Kilt on 07/27/2006 15:19:20 MDT Print View

I bought a down smock from a company called Klattermusen. On their website they also had a hiking kilt available - 160gr size medium. I never tried it, so don't know what it's like but it is another option. The website is :

http://www.klattermusen.com

And the product is the McKilt.

J R
(RavenUL) - F
Re: Kilt on 07/27/2006 20:07:16 MDT Print View

Brian

No problem. Just trying to answer your question.

J R
(RavenUL) - F
Re: Re: Kilt on 07/27/2006 20:16:43 MDT Print View

The McKilt is sort of in the same neighborhood as the Mountain Hardwear Kilt.

Decent idea, but poor execution. Too short, and the material combined with the cut make for a get-up thats more restrictive than a tight pair of jeans (in my opinion)

Once upon a time, Utilikilt offered their "survivor" model in Epic Nylon. They pulled it for durability concerns, but it was a good idea. Their current spartan kilt isnt too bad. SportKilts PCT tartan might not be bad if its made with a synthetic microfiber (not sure). Bear Kilts make good kilts for hiking (their Canadian tartans are pretty light. "Bear" tells me that a kilt made with that material in a 4 yard cut would weigh about 1lbs). Finally, a sarong made out of a synthetic fabric is very light, and can be worn MANY ways.

Brian James
(bjamesd) - F

Locale: South Coast of BC
Sarong on 07/27/2006 21:25:48 MDT Print View

Wow; hiking in a Sarong. Awesome. You could configure it for heat, cold, sunshine, or sweating. You'd look like you were on a pilgrimmage to a holy place... like a Hindu Ascetic.

Now there's ultralight for ya: a Sarong and bare feet, living off the donations of strangers as you travel. Total skin-out weight: 8 oz.

Beat that Ray Jardine! :)

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Sarong on 07/30/2006 22:06:41 MDT Print View

I remember going to the summit of Haleakala on Maui to watch the sun rise. As few tourists to Hawaii bring warm clothing, many take the blankets from their hotel room, so you see little groups of pastel pink, green or blue robed pilgrims making the way from the parking lot to the relative shelter of the observation platform.

On a morning when there are clouds below the summit, the sun rays skim across the clouds for a few minutes. It is awesome.

Eric Noble
(ericnoble) - MLife

Locale: Colorado Rockies
Re: Re: Sarong on 07/30/2006 23:22:07 MDT Print View

Thanks for bring back some great memories Dale. The clouds where below us when we where there also. It was beautiful watching the wind drive the clouds over the rim of the crater. We hiked down into the crater. The hike out was deceptively difficult. I am from Colorado and was a little to cocky about the hike. The volcanic ash is like sand. I was humbled by the end. Sorry to hijack the thread.

Miguel Arboleda
(butuki) - MLife

Locale: Kanto Plain, Japan
Re: Sarong on 07/30/2006 23:34:04 MDT Print View

Now there's ultralight for ya: a Sarong and bare feet, living off the donations of strangers as you travel. Total skin-out weight: 8 oz.

Reminds me of one of the first articles I read at BackpackingLight when I first joined way back when.