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Kier Selinsky
(Kieran) - F

Locale: Seattle, WA
Hammock bug netting on 07/30/2010 21:24:10 MDT Print View

So previously I got some feedback cause I want to try hammock camping. I have a couple of these bad boys on the way. While waiting for them to arrive, I need to get some other stuff ready to use them.

I know how to get a ridgeline set up, and some tree huggers and a tarp. I need some specifics on bug netting though.

I want to just do that setup where I attach the bug netting to the ridgeline and let it hang with some weight in it. No-see-um netting comes in 54" width - is this wide enough? Or do I need 54" on both sides of the ridgline? Or is there no way to tell and I just need to wait till everything is set and I can measure it with me in the setup?

Also, are online fabric suppliers the only place to get no-see-um? or are there brick and mortar places as well?

Thanks!

PS: I know I can post this message at HF, but I need another forum account like I need a hole in my head. :)

Edited by Kieran on 07/30/2010 21:34:05 MDT.

bj bretzke
(lilorphanbilly) - F

Locale: Montana, MT (Stealth Mode)
Hammock bug netting on 07/30/2010 23:55:32 MDT Print View

Kieran,
Have another espresso and chill out.
(just kidding)
Every hammock hangs different so until you get the goods, you will never know. I am willing to bet that 54" over the ridge won't be enough. 54" on each side will give you approx four foot of hang which should cover you in the middle.ww2
My personal favorite. (WWII Jungle Hammock)

Hike hard. Hike often.
BJ

Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Re: Hammock bug netting on 07/31/2010 07:04:20 MDT Print View

for my simple gathered end hammock i used a piece of no-see-um and put velcro on the ends so it could close over the lines. I then slipped some weight in the middle of each side to hold it down. I just used the roll width - a hem and it just made the width, i mean just. The more sag you use (flatter sleep on the diagonal) the more width you'll need from the mesh as the hammock dips lower below the ridgeline.

An option i have been considering because to save weight is to just do enough bug netting so it can drape over my top half and tuck around my quilt. If it is cold enough for this to work (being able to be fully covered by the quilt) the bugs might not be an issue any way though. I would just take 2yds and sew 1 60" side together leaving a small enough gap for the lines. I would pull this over the head end and then when i needed it i could pull it over me and tuck around my quilt. This wouldn't be supported by the ridgeline but could have a tab over your face to pull it up to the ridgeline to keep it off you.

Right now i am testing a hammock (not made nor designed by me) that has full bug proofing so i hadn't gotten around to trying this out but it is my plan if i try to do UL or SUL hammock hiking. Right now i plan to hammock for canoeing only.

-Tim

Chris Peichel
(momo)

Locale: Eureka
Hammock bug netting on 07/31/2010 08:42:20 MDT Print View

Over the next week or so I will be making a gathered end hammock, separate bug net and tarp. Currently I have some ideas on the netting from other members here, I will share what I end up with. My goal is to have it light and removable.

Kier Selinsky
(Kieran) - F

Locale: Seattle, WA
Re: Hammock bug netting on 07/31/2010 09:11:05 MDT Print View

Thanks for the feedback everyone. I'll stop in a few craft stores and see if I luck into some $1 bin netting, otherwise I'll wait for delivery and then measure it...

@Chris I agree I want it to be removable. In Ohio we only have 3 months of bug season, so it would be nice to be able to take the netting off for spring and fall

Vick Hines
(vickrhines) - F

Locale: Central Texas
Re: Re: Hammock bug netting on 07/31/2010 10:54:24 MDT Print View

The only craft store netting you are likely to find is a dress fabric for proms and such. Don't remember what it is called. It will stop mosquitoes but not no-seeums. It is light, but not durable at all. It is usually cheap, though, so you can experiment.

For a diagonal lie, you need a good bit of sag and more sag means more net. I use two widths of 54" nanoseeum from Thruhiker, hemmed together along the ridge with a casing to run the ridge line through. The casing keeps the net from sliding off one side. Pockets on each side will hold water bottles or shoes to keep the net from flying up in the wind. Hand stitch the ends after you have tried pins to see where to stitch with the hammock set up and you in it. Velcro is not so good on the ends. It snaggs and tears net. Long running stitches will do the job, are easy to remove and quick to replace if you ever have to. However, you can still take the hammock apart without removing the stitching.

Vick Hines
(vickrhines) - F

Locale: Central Texas
Re: Re: Re: Hammock bug netting on 07/31/2010 11:12:48 MDT Print View

OK, I called JoAnn's - that dress fabric is calle 'toole' or just 'net'.

Don Miller
(UlTipiGuru) - F

Locale: IOWA
walmart sheer on 07/31/2010 14:16:43 MDT Print View

Get no seeum mesh at walmart for $1.50 a yd. It is probably used for window curtain sheer, but is awesome for bug net. No bug can get in with it. I sew a channel on each end and your dimensions are 120"X120".

Kier Selinsky
(Kieran) - F

Locale: Seattle, WA
Re: walmart sheer on 07/31/2010 20:46:43 MDT Print View

Get no seeum mesh at walmart for $1.50 a yd.
My local wally worlds are suckatash. They never have ripstop or no-see-um. I check a couple times a month just in case I can score some $1 bin goods.

Ken Thompson
(kthompson) - MLife
Re: Hammock bug netting on 08/01/2010 18:42:25 MDT Print View

Here is a solution from over at HF

mnet

Kier Selinsky
(Kieran) - F

Locale: Seattle, WA
Nice! on 08/01/2010 21:36:55 MDT Print View

Those are some info-graphic chops! great visual - thanks man!