Stealth Nano Guyline length recommendations
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Andrew Wilson
(andreww) - MLife

Locale: Vosges
Stealth Nano Guyline length recommendations on 07/29/2010 12:33:01 MDT Print View

I'm the happy owner of the stealth Nano and need to cut my guyline kit down to size. Any recommendations on what lengths to use for the tieouts? (using tensioners) Thanks. Andrew

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Stealth Nano Guyline length recommendations on 07/29/2010 15:31:48 MDT Print View

Considering the advantages of having long guys available for when you need them, and the microscopic weight the string represents, why cut them short?

Cheers

Tad Englund
(bestbuilder) - F - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Stealth Nano Guyline length recommendations on 07/29/2010 21:23:50 MDT Print View

Andrew-
Ridge lines 15 ft. min.
Corners 8 ft. min.
Mid Panel 6ft min.

But as Roger said, why cut them (that) short? There have been times that I've needed longer then I had (and wished I had more).

Andrew Wilson
(andreww) - MLife

Locale: Vosges
Yes... but the tensioners on 07/29/2010 22:51:50 MDT Print View

I would normally go with those lengths, as the cord is so ridiculously light.

But if I use the tensioners, it's less the maximum that concerns me, but the minimum. It seems to me that this would limit me to a minimum length of 1/2 the guyline. 4 ft at the corners, for example sounds much more than I would regularly use.

I could of course I bypass the tensioners, going with the old clove or taught-line hitch as I've always done. But then I might as well not use the tensioners at all.

Help me imagine how to best use (or not) these little things.

Andrew

Tad Englund
(bestbuilder) - F - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Yes... but the tensioners on 07/29/2010 23:20:07 MDT Print View

Andrew, maybe I should have asked this first- what are you using them on? Tarp or tent? Yes I think it make a difference

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Stealth Nano Guyline length recommendations on 07/30/2010 02:24:12 MDT Print View

I almost always use a tarp in A Frame mode. For the ridgeline ties outs about 8' (cantenary cuts usually not as long in back). You will usually not use one cord to run under the ridgline of the tarp, but use the ridgeline tie outs.

On the sides and mid I cut my cord to around 2', and normally adjust them to around 18", shorter in bad weather, and sometimes a littl longer. If your sides are longer, you can place your stakes around obstacles in tight spots.

The tensioners are light and useful, making set-up even quicker. But the shortest cord length with be 1/2 of the cord length.

Marco A. Sánchez
(marcoasn) - M

Locale: The fabulous Pyrenees
Re: Stealth Nano Guyline length recommendations on 07/30/2010 03:28:53 MDT Print View

Considering the advantages of having long guys available for when you need them, and the microscopic weight the string represents, why cut them short?

+1

But if I use the tensioners, it's less the maximum that concerns me, but the minimum. It seems to me that this would limit me to a minimum length of 1/2 the guyline. 4 ft at the corners, for example sounds much more than I would regularly use.

To solve this issue you can tie a slippery simple knot at the end of the guyline to adjust its “minimum length”. This method is showed in the fantastic article Ditch Your Stakes: A Guide To Alternative Shelter Anchors:

Cam lock tensioner



However, tying knots with thin spectra cord may be a little tricky with cold hands, so you can replace the slippery knot with two simple knots, and use as stopper the most convenient:

Cam lock tensioner

Edited by marcoasn on 07/30/2010 03:29:38 MDT.

Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Re: Re: Stealth Nano Guyline length recommendations on 07/30/2010 06:25:16 MDT Print View

if tying knots in the thin spectra sounds tough you can also adjust the length of the cord by using a twig in a clove hitch behind the tensioner.

-Tim

Kevin Babione
(KBabione) - MLife

Locale: Pennsylvania
Using Tensioners on 07/30/2010 07:32:02 MDT Print View

Maybe I'm backwards, but I always put the tensioner loop through the tarp tieout. This keeps the tensioner or linelock closer to the tarp (i.e. higher) which makes it easier to adjust. I have a loop at the "free" end through which I can put a stake or I can simply create a loop anywhere along the length of the line if it's too long.

My guylines also tend to be too long but the total additional weight is hard to measure in grams so I don't really care and enjoy the convenience.

Sidenote: I'm now primarily a hanger so my tarp guylines are much longer than when I was a ground dweller.