Converting sleeping bag to quilt
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Kier Selinsky
(Kieran) - F

Locale: Seattle, WA
Converting sleeping bag to quilt on 07/07/2010 09:12:14 MDT Print View

Hi All -
I'm thinking of grabbing a Campmor down bag or similar and converting to a quilt. A couple questions related to this: first, how much weight can I really shave off by converting it to a quilt? I don't know what to expect that the zipper and material will weigh.

Second, how much less warm will the resulting quilt be (compared to the sleeping bag), if at all?

Aaron W
(ADW245) - MLife

Locale: Chula Vista
Converting sleeping bag to quilt on 07/07/2010 12:22:54 MDT Print View

I don’t know if this helps but pure bound did this some time ago.

http://purebound.com/homemade/sleepingbag/

Kier Selinsky
(Kieran) - F

Locale: Seattle, WA
Re: Converting sleeping bag to quilt on 07/07/2010 13:18:00 MDT Print View

That answers a big part of it - pretty incredible that they reduced the weight from 36 to 24 oz. So what's left is the second question: will this affect the temp rating at all? If I convert a 20* bag, is it a 20* quilt? Or does it become a 30* quilt?

Aaron W
(ADW245) - MLife

Locale: Chula Vista
Converting sleeping bag to quilt on 07/07/2010 14:24:49 MDT Print View

On one hand I would say the loft is the same as a 20* bag. One other you are losing the hood. I think bag ratings are a personal thing. I have a Golite ultra 20 quilt that I can only use down to 30* when some people are fine into the single digits. You could always e-mail pure bound.

Steven Evans
(Steve_Evans) - MLife

Locale: Canada
Re: Converting sleeping bag to quilt on 07/07/2010 16:11:28 MDT Print View

I think BPL actually did an article on how to convert a bag to a quilt a while back. Do a search.

I think the temp rating would stay somewhat the same unless you removed some material and used the extra down in the baffles.

Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Re: Re: Converting sleeping bag to quilt on 07/07/2010 16:21:43 MDT Print View

temp ratings are essential useless. If the loft remains the same or increases (due to less width but same amount of down) then the quilt will have the same (or better if loft increases) temp capabilities as the bag as long as the fit keeps out drafts. Don't factor in the hood to temp rating, use your warm hat you will have along anyway. If you remove down from the hood and add it back to the bag you can increase the loft fractionally.

If you plan to buy the bag new i am wondering why you wouldn't just get the thru-hiker quilt kit and make your own quilt from scratch from higher quality down and fabric?

-Tim

Marco A. Sánchez
(marcoasn) - M

Locale: The fabulous Pyrenees
Re: Converting sleeping bag to quilt on 07/08/2010 02:51:54 MDT Print View

"I think BPL actually did an article on how to convert a bag to a quilt a while back. Do a search."

Transforming a Mummy Sleeping Bag into an Arc Top Bag

However, an online subscription is required to view the article.

"If you plan to buy the bag new i am wondering why you wouldn't just get the thru-hiker quilt kit and make your own quilt from scratch from higher quality down and fabric?"

+1

Converting a mummy bag into a quilt makes sense if you already have the bag.

Jamie Shortt
(jshortt) - MLife

Locale: North Carolina
re: Converting sleeping bag to quilt on 07/08/2010 06:04:43 MDT Print View

What a great article Jay did. I can not believe I haven't seen this one before. All I can say is if you are thinking about doing a sleeping bag to quilt conversion I highly recommend reading this article. A subscription will be really worth it.

Jay answers...
How to cut off the hood
How long to make it, given your height
How to remove the zipper
How to add a draw cord chamber
How to add bottom straps
How to finish of the seams
etc, etc, etc...

I'd also echo considering a thru-hiker quilt kit. The big difference in effort is sewing the netting for baffles and stuffing the down. You can make a great quilt, but those steps are time consumming.

Jamie

Kier Selinsky
(Kieran) - F

Locale: Seattle, WA
Great insight on 07/08/2010 10:04:04 MDT Print View

temp ratings are essential useless.

Agreed - I just use them as a measuring stick

If the loft remains the same or increases (due to less width but same amount of down) then the quilt will have the same (or better if loft increases) temp capabilities as the bag as long as the fit keeps out drafts.

That's exactly what I was wondering. Thanks!

If you plan to buy the bag new i am wondering why you wouldn't just get the thru-hiker quilt kit and make your own quilt from scratch from higher quality down and fabric?

I'm 99% sure I'd completely screw up a down-quilt-from-scratch kit. Plus, I tend to waaaay overanalyze projects, so if I buy the kit, it'll sit in the closet for 6 months till I finally have it figured enough to start. At least if I buy a bag then I can use it till I've got my head around it. Another advantage of buying a sleeping bag is that the hardest part is done for me already (baffles and down stuffing). Also, many times there are bags on clearance that are higher quality than the campmor, but similar in price (after discount).

Thanks for the article link - I hadn't seen that before. I used to have a premium membership till just recently but let it lapse. I'll be renewing soon.

Edited by Kieran on 07/08/2010 10:04:40 MDT.

Michael Henrick
(Hikerbox) - F - M

Locale: Boston
Did it! on 10/22/2014 19:38:41 MDT Print View

I got inspired by this old thread and renovated my 15 degree marmot bag. Saved half a pound, which beats buying a new quilt!

http://theuncalculatedlife.blogspot.com/2014/10/the-great-sleeping-bag-butchering-of.html

Sam Haraldson
(sharalds) - MLife

Locale: Gallatin Range
Converting sleeping bag to quilt on 10/23/2014 11:07:10 MDT Print View

My two cents. My first quilt was a thrift store mummy bag conversion. I used it for a month and bought a purpose built model. It made sense to me as an inexpensive means to find out whether I liked using a quilt.

Michael Henrick
(Hikerbox) - F - M

Locale: Boston
Budget on 10/23/2014 11:39:13 MDT Print View

Yeah, I realize I could save another 8-10 ounces with an online bought version but this cost $0 vs ~$280+ and it was a good confidence builder for future projects.