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Clothing for Teton NP
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Joe Cangelosi
(JoeFish) - F

Locale: All Over California
Clothing for Teton NP on 06/24/2010 21:20:12 MDT Print View

Hello, everybody,

I'm planning on hiking through Avalanche Canyon in Grand Teton NP in the second half of July. I've been told to expect nighttime temps of as low as 20 degrees, and days up to the 70s. The terrain and the area of the country are very different from my usual hikes.

I tend to be quite warm, and I also tend to sleep in my clothes for trips three nights and under (including this one). I usually hike in REI generic convertible nylon pants and 2 polyester top layers and pack a fleece and raingear (arcteryx midweight pants and jacket). I just got an REI SubKilo 20 degree sleeping bag. Seeing the potential for so much swing in temps, and since I am unfamiliar with the area, I was planning on packing a set of silk long johns as well.

I'm pretty low maintenance, and definitely a no-frills kind of hiker.

So my question is, will this be enough? Or am I out of my mind?

Jonathan Ryan
(Jkrew81) - F - M

Locale: White Mtns
Re: Clothing for Teton NP on 06/25/2010 05:55:58 MDT Print View

Hey Joe
I am headed out to do the Teton Crest Trail in a few weeks and I have heard much the same. My in-laws did a mid-june trip out there and they had a mix of snow/sleet and temps in the 20's. While I hear July is a much warmer time of year I am going prepared for pretty diverse conditions and a sleep system that will get my down to freezing. Here's what I am to bring

Clothing
Patagonia button up sun shirt (bug and sun protection)
supplex hiking pants
Patagonia NanoPuff
ID eVent Jkt
Arc Teryx fleece vest (warmth on the move)
BPL UL Hoody and long johns (dedicated for sleeping)
ULA Rain Wrap
spare socks

Sleep System
RidgeRest 3/4
Prolite 3/4
Western Mountaineering Summerlite

FYI I tend to run warm pretty much all the time thus the 32 deg bag and no gloves.

Edited by Jkrew81 on 06/25/2010 05:58:39 MDT.

Joe Cangelosi
(JoeFish) - F

Locale: All Over California
Thanks for sharing! on 06/25/2010 12:54:47 MDT Print View

Thanks for sharing, Ryan. I think at the end of the day, my question is whether to invest in some kind of down outerwear. Your kit lays out intelligently, so I think maybe I will.

Do you love the nanopuff? Or is it just what you've got for now?

Jonathan Ryan
(Jkrew81) - F - M

Locale: White Mtns
Re: Thanks for sharing! on 06/25/2010 13:05:41 MDT Print View

I love the Nano, would not trade it for anything. I live in New England so synthetic insulation for clothing is the way to go. I have had too many instances where I was soaked and frozen and synthetic insulation saved the day. Best of all the Nano is a great all purpose jacket. I wear it to work all winter, under my hardshell when skiing and as my primary insulation for spring to fall hiking.

FYI I hear the Tetons can be pretty buggy in July thus the long pants and shirt (Patagonia Sol Patrol pants and El Ray shirt). The supplex shirt/ eVent jacket also negate my need for a windshirt. In a light breeze the button up is enough and when the wind picks up eVent is breathable enough so I do not overheat. I carry the Arc Teryx Breva vest as moving insulation. Great under a hardshell in a cold rain. The Nano is for crazy cold weather, sitting around camp and additional warmth for sleeping.

Mary D
(hikinggranny) - MLife

Locale: Gateway to Columbia River Gorge
Clothing for Teton NP on 06/25/2010 14:34:59 MDT Print View

Just be warned you can expect temps down to 20*F and snow any time during the summer. I'd also consider Capilene 2 or lightweight merino wool for the base layer. And you might want to reconsider lightweight liner gloves.

Edited by hikinggranny on 06/25/2010 14:38:53 MDT.

Joe Cangelosi
(JoeFish) - F

Locale: All Over California
Re: Clothing for Teton NP on 06/26/2010 21:00:14 MDT Print View

Mary,

My hands are (have always been from youth) slightly arthiritc, so I almost always have some gloves. I just picked up a synthetic midweight baselayer, but I have heard wonderful things about the merino. Do you think it's worth the extra money?

I might pick up the puff or something like it; REI's early summer sale is on, and since I drive all over CA, I've checking out as many stores as I can hit.

Mary, do you think the vest is a must-have during the day? I tend to stay pretty warm in a heavier baselayer and rain jacket.

Mary D
(hikinggranny) - MLife

Locale: Gateway to Columbia River Gorge
Clothing for Teton NP on 06/26/2010 22:12:14 MDT Print View

I think the list with no gloves was Jonathan's, so that advice was for him.

It was the silk baselayer I figured would be too lightweight. I personally haven't found silk to have any warmth. Your mileage may vary! If your midweight is the REI midweight, it might be too warm. Lightweight might be better--something between silk and the midweight. I usually don't wear my baselayer (Capilene 2) while I'm hiking, except when I substitute the top for a shirt. I found that the flies in the Wind Rivers (just south of where you'll be) bit right through the thing, though. That's the main reason I now take a very lightweight windshirt--to keep the flies (deerflies and enormous horseflies that look big enough to carry away a horse) off me when I stop.

I take a vest (very lightweight fleece) for layering over the base layer under my windshirt while hiking, but I don't need it until the temps get down to freezing. That's while I'm moving. When I stop, on goes the puffy jacket (mine is a Montbell UL Thermawrap), and there have been times when the puffy jacket plus vest plus the rain jacket over the base layer have all been needed. I get well heated while I'm hiking, but i'm a cold sleeper and also get cold really fast when I stop, which is why I bundle up the instant my pack comes off!

The Nanopuff is warmer than my Montbell UL Thermawrap, so you may not need the vest. I like to have a couple of thinner layers so I can thermoregulate better, but that's me.

Joe Cangelosi
(JoeFish) - F

Locale: All Over California
Clothing for Teton NP on 06/27/2010 03:13:29 MDT Print View

Hmmm... the bugs sound vicious. Maybe a headnet?

Thanks for the analysis on your methods. I don't have a lot of experience with cold-weather hiking. Usually desert winter nights around 30 are the coldest I see. But this trip and most of the others I am planning will be colder.

I actually thought the midweight was a little heavy...maybe the answer is a cotton or polyester t shirt for hiking, which is what I usually do.

Lots of options, but I think the down vest or jacket is in order. I will check out the thermawrap.

Thanks, continuously.

Jonathan Ryan
(Jkrew81) - F - M

Locale: White Mtns
Re: Re: Clothing for Teton NP on 06/27/2010 06:11:41 MDT Print View

Good call on the headnet. I tend to always carrying one through the summer but forgot to add it to my list.

Speaking of bugs I am also bringing my Tarptent Double Rainbow to have a comfortable place to hang out at night.