making a bear bag system
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rhonda rouyer
(rrouyer) - F

Locale: deep south
making a bear bag system on 05/18/2010 17:31:13 MDT Print View

It was suggested when having my gear list critiqued, that my bear line and rock sack seemed heavy ( 4.50z) I am experimenting with making a light wt. version. I swapped out the solid nylon bag for a mesh one, smaller caribiner,and 50 ft of the type of line that contractors use to string off the foundation of houses etc. It seems pretty strong, nylon. It's exactly like what is on my Tarptent. Question...will this type of line hold up and support a 6-8 lb food bag?

Steve .
(pappekak) - F

Locale: Tralfamadore
Bear Bag System on 05/19/2010 01:04:04 MDT Print View

For a rock sack I use part of a nylon stocking and leave it long enough to tie around a loop in the rope.

For a food sack I use a heavy plastic shopping bag.

Ankle stocking (.2 oz)
Wild Oats plastic bag (.5 oz)
40 feet BPL AirCore Pro cord (1.2 oz)
"Nite Ize S-Biner Size #2 (.25 oz)
------
Total 2.15 oz

Edited by pappekak on 05/19/2010 01:06:23 MDT.

Keith Selbo
(herman666) - F - M

Locale: Northern Virginia
add to your skill mix on 05/19/2010 07:58:54 MDT Print View

Google the Klutz Book of Knots or find a knot website and learn how to reliably tie your line directly to a good heavy rock. No bag to carry or wear out.

I used to use the rock sack. Trust me, this is less bother and you'll feel better about yourself in the bargain.

Acronym Esq
(acronym.esq) - F

Locale: TX
Re: making a bear bag system on 05/19/2010 09:24:06 MDT Print View

I would guess the 2mm braided nylon mason line has a working load of 10 kg and tensile strength of 100 kg (so it should work).

I have some #48 braided nylon line called "catfish line" that is rated to 120 kg. I routinely hang/hoist 10-20 kg from it w/o any trouble.

You could test your line by hanging a gallon milk jug full of water (should be about 8 lbs)...

acronym 5/19/2010 10:23 AM

Keith Selbo
(herman666) - F - M

Locale: Northern Virginia
The thinner the line ... on 05/19/2010 11:49:48 MDT Print View

The thinner the line, the deeper the cut in the branch. A slick polypropylene rope about 0.125 in. diameter is a good compromise between weight and thinness.

rhonda rouyer
(rrouyer) - F

Locale: deep south
Test hang on 05/19/2010 13:43:40 MDT Print View

I did a test hang with the thin line and it nearly cut into my hands hoisting the sack. So maybe not. Found some light wt nylon cord lighter than what i had and a little thicker that worked better. The line is 41 ft long as opposed to the 50 ft line i usually used ...should be okay.

Like the idea of the stocking bag so will use that idea to cut weight. total wt of bear rope system 2.6 oz.

Robert Blean
(blean) - MLife

Locale: San Jose -- too far from Sierras
Re: Test hang on 05/19/2010 13:45:44 MDT Print View

Like the idea of the stocking bag

Just a question: is the stocking bag more susceptible to getting hung up on little roughnesses that somthing slick like a light nylon bag?

--MV

rhonda rouyer
(rrouyer) - F

Locale: deep south
Re: Re: Test hang on 05/19/2010 13:53:35 MDT Print View

Ummm...good question. Steve uses one, let's ask him. Steve? I'm guessing no more problem than a mesh bag....Maybe I could just use my Buff to wrap the rock in and tie it off like bag...Multifunctional?

Acronym Esq
(acronym.esq) - F

Locale: TX
Re: Test hang on 05/19/2010 14:23:28 MDT Print View

> I did a test hang with the thin line and it nearly cut into my hands hoisting the sack

I don't usually have that problem b/c I have someone push the bag up while I am hoisting. A stick can extend their assisting reach another couple feet.

If for some reason I really wanted to yank the cord, wrapping it around a stick a couple times (or girth/clove/Siberian hitch) would make a nice handle.

acronym 5/19/2010 3:22 PM

rhonda rouyer
(rrouyer) - F

Locale: deep south
Re: Re: Test hang on 05/19/2010 15:06:48 MDT Print View

Good idea about making a handle. I think the thin line will hold fine for the one night I will need it. After our 1st night on the trail we will have to stay in the shelters and they all have bear cables. Trying to pack according to what I need specific to this trip and not "in general".

Javan Dempsey
(jdempsey)

Locale: The-Stateless-Society
mason's line on 05/19/2010 19:32:07 MDT Print View

I seriously wouldn't use any type of mason's line, the diameter is too small not to a) cut branches, b) cut hands. It's also really stretchy, which is actually sort of a "feature" of the line..

Been using this stuff extensively throughout my life for it's intended purpose, and while it works great for hammock whipping, or even a clothes line, I'd stick to something slippery, low stretch, and sturdy, for bear bagging.

I recently posted trying to find something lighter than my 7/64th amsteel blue for bear bagging, which weighs around 2.5oz for 50ft. After reading the info out there, decided to stick with it.

If I'm hiking for 7 days, I'd rather carry 7 days worth of food, instead of resupplying, so I prefer the performance that the Amsteel offers.

William Puckett
(Beep) - F

Locale: Land of 11, 842 lakes
making a bear bag system on 05/19/2010 20:46:00 MDT Print View

Instead of Mason Line, try "Lash-It" or "Zing-It" line (in the 2 mm size) from Redden Marine. The Zing It has a slick coating on the outside to help reduce friction over tree limbs.

rhonda rouyer
(rrouyer) - F

Locale: deep south
responses on 05/19/2010 22:05:55 MDT Print View

So many good suggestions! Any other thoughts on using the stocking as a rock bag?

Travis Leanna
(T.L.) - MLife

Locale: Wisconsin
Re: responses on 05/19/2010 22:14:14 MDT Print View

rhonda,
Just a suggestion: AntiGravityGear's Treeline

http://www.antigravitygear.com/antigravitygear-treeline-40-spectra-725-line.html

1 ounce.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: responses on 05/19/2010 22:35:14 MDT Print View

The problem is that 40 feet may be too short. I've had lots where 50 feet was barely long enough. However, I have never seen one where 60 feet was not enough.

--B.G.--

Travis Leanna
(T.L.) - MLife

Locale: Wisconsin
Re: Re: Re: responses on 05/20/2010 05:05:26 MDT Print View

I wonder if they'd give you a longer custom length if you asked for it? Probably for a bit more money as well.

Keith Selbo
(herman666) - F - M

Locale: Northern Virginia
The lightest rock bag out there on 05/20/2010 08:04:30 MDT Print View

"So many good suggestions! Any other thoughts on using the stocking as a rock bag?"

The lightest, most reliable bag is no bag at all. With practice, you can truss up a rock on the end of your rope and get a good hang every time. You'll be wondering why you ever bothered with the hassle and weight of a rock sack.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Simple rock sack on 05/20/2010 08:42:49 MDT Print View

Learning to use line alone to tie up a small rock certainly makes sense. As far as a bag, a simple square of light cloth left over from a MYOG project or cut from worn out gear will do the trick.

Paul Gibson
(pgibson) - F

Locale: SW Idaho
Throw line and Rock Sack on 05/20/2010 09:43:09 MDT Print View

I sell a complete bear bag system or just the accessory pieces in a small kit. My 50' of 2mm throw line with spliced eye loops and spliced in-line rock sack with micro carabiner and micro cord lock for the rock sack weighs in at 1.5 oz

http://arrowheadequipment.webs.com/apps/webstore/products/show/1471999

Throw line with Rock Sack

Cheers

Paul
Arrowhead Equipment

rhonda rouyer
(rrouyer) - F

Locale: deep south
Re: Throw line and Rock Sack on 05/20/2010 13:36:13 MDT Print View

Perfect! Just ordered it.Good price too. Cased closed!