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John McAlpine
(HairlessApe) - M

Locale: PNW
New TT Sublite Sil 2010 on 05/11/2010 11:58:11 MDT Print View

Any thoughts on this new side entry Tarptent at 24 oz?

I like the wieght and the fact it's side entry. I was thinking of a Contrail until I saw this.

http://www.tarptent.com/subliteSil2010.html

ben wood
(benwood)

Locale: flatlands of MO
Re: New TT Sublite Sil 2010 on 05/11/2010 12:10:27 MDT Print View

looks really nice to me, the weight has gone up a few ounces since the 09 version, but still not bad considering to options, its very similar to a lunar solo from SMD. i'm sure it'd be a fine shelter.

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
New TT Sublite Sil 2010 on 05/11/2010 17:23:37 MDT Print View

its very similar to a lunar solo from SMD

Really ?
TT Sublite sil
SMD LS
Franco

ben wood
(benwood)

Locale: flatlands of MO
Re: New TT Sublite Sil 2010 on 05/11/2010 17:36:45 MDT Print View

I should've known you'd pick up on that franco! I meant the trekking pole use, side entry, vestibule. Some similarities, many differences though as your photos point out. It looks like the new sublite is great, I really like the way the vestibule works and the interior space. Although I don't own either, I do have a squall classic that I like.

Thomas Burns
(nerdboy52) - MLife

Locale: "Alas, poor Yogi.I knew him well."
Contrail vs. Sublite Sil on 05/11/2010 17:44:54 MDT Print View

Both tents have a lot going for them. The Contrail is roomier. The Sublite is more stable. The Sublite sheds water better, but it has a smallish vestibule. (My Sublite, version 1, has no vestibule at all.) The Contrail has that big, flat surface and a simple one-hiking-pole setup, which are good things in good weather. The Sublite is much better in the wind because of the two hiking poles and the steep angles of the side walls.

The Sublite is easier to get in and out of and it sheds snow more easily because of the steep walls, but the steep walls make for less usable room compared to the Contrail.

If you're going for stability and 3+ season use, I'd go with the Sublite. If you might occasionally entertain a sleeping companion or you don't plan ever to use the tent in light snow, I'd go with the Contrail.

During summer, I always take the Contrail. When there's a chance for bad weather in the shoulder seasons, I always take the Sublite.

I love them both, and wouldn't part with either -- unless, of course I can find the cash to buy the new Sublite Sil 2010 to replace my older version. Hey, Henry! If you're looking for a beta tester, I'm your guy!

Stargazer

Edited by nerdboy52 on 05/11/2010 17:45:43 MDT.

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
New TT Sublite Sil 2010 on 05/11/2010 18:54:20 MDT Print View

Ben
That reminds me of one of the many funny episodes at work.
One day I walked onto the shop floor to find a very puzzled elderly Chinese woman. So I asked if I could help her. She was searching for the person that served her about an hour before and could not see him (we would have had 20 or so salespeople working at the time) So I looked at her and asked " We all look the same to you , don't we ?"
Her reply was "yes ,you do" and she smiled. So we sold her a camera and everybody was happy.
Franco
BTW, Tarptents are tested for months , some models over a year before they are available for sale . Of course when they come out customers find ways of "improving" them, hence the changes.

Peter Longobardi
(paintplongo) - F

Locale: Hopefully on the Trail
I'd pass on 05/11/2010 20:48:52 MDT Print View

I'd pass, if you snap/bend a trekking pole bad enough, you won't be able to setup the shelter. I've seen far too many bent/snapped poles, including my own, to consider a shelter like this.

Mike S
(MikeyLXT) - F

Locale: Maryland
Poles on 05/11/2010 20:57:42 MDT Print View

Both Tarptent and SMD sell UL tent poles that can be used instead of trekking poles.

Peter Longobardi
(paintplongo) - F

Locale: Hopefully on the Trail
TT poles on 05/11/2010 21:14:52 MDT Print View

How much weight do they add? Why not just purchase a Moment at that point?

Miguel Arboleda
(butuki) - MLife

Locale: Kanto Plain, Japan
Re: I'd pass on 05/11/2010 22:05:13 MDT Print View

I'd pass, if you snap/bend a trekking pole bad enough, you won't be able to setup the shelter. I've seen far too many bent/snapped poles, including my own, to consider a shelter like this.

I'm puzzled by this statement. Trekking poles are much stronger than regular tent poles and are much more stable in strong winds. If you break or lose a trekking pole you can substitute it with a branch found on the trail. With regular tent poles, if you break one it is very hard to find a substitute... though you could whittle down a thin sapling and try to fit it into the tent sleeve (wigwams were made by bending surrounding, living saplings into interlaced poles and covering them with pieces of bark).

James Byrnes
(backfeets1) - M

Locale: Midwest.... Missouri
Sublite poles... on 05/11/2010 22:55:49 MDT Print View

I have the older version Sublite and the poles weigh about 4.1 ozs for both 54". I replaced the shock cord with spectra fishing line, and removed two end tips.
The newer version has more head room and needs longer poles 58". I"m 5'7" and the only grip I had was the head room. The .344 poles weight about .03327 oz/inch plus the Ferrel wt of .051. Expecting weight of poles to be 4.3-4.5 oz. I will post a review later of the new version.

S Long
(Izeloz)

Locale: Wasatch
Sublite vs. Moment on 05/11/2010 23:24:53 MDT Print View

I am wondering which of these is more weather stable and why. I know the website lists the Sublite as a 3 season and the Moment as 3+, but why? I REALLY like the Moment but I am a trekking pole user and it would nice to get a dual use out of an item I am already carrying.

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
New TT Sublite Sil 2010 on 05/12/2010 00:12:28 MDT Print View

Henry is on his way to Scotland so I will attempt to address some of the points raised above.
There are six solo shelters in the Tarptent line up; they are different enough to justify having them all.
Of the above the Contrail has the largest usable floor space bar the Rainbow, enough in emergency for two hikers using std sized mats.
The Sublite is a largish solo tent . The side entry is particularly appealing for some.
Both of these are of interest in particular to users of trekking poles.
For the Contrail there is a 2oz front pole available if required.
The 2010 Sublite is not really suitable for the Easton type pole solution (too high for that) but designed to be used with std 135cm (or longer) trekking poles .
The Moment is of a more aerodynamic shape , no large flat panels here, better for deflecting strong winds than the other two. (install the pole guylines...)
With the optional "freestanding" crossing pole, it will also hold a foot or so of snow, so enough for some shoulder season/4 season use for some.
BTW, do keep in mind that as Miguel has pointed out , trekking poles, in general , are much stronger than the std tent poles , so don't expect the Contrail to stand up with the 2 oz Easton in strong wind as it would with a good trekking pole. So whilst I have had the Contrail up in somewhat exposed areas using the BD pole, I would not do that with the 2 oz Easton.
Franco
franco at tarptent dot com

Frank Steele
(knarfster) - F

Locale: Arizona
Contrail roomy? on 05/12/2010 00:57:08 MDT Print View

The Contrail didn't feel very roomy. I didn't like the fron entrance, and it got real cramped with head room real fast. I am MUCH happier with the Rainbow. The new Sublite looks appealing.

I wish he made the Tyvek with the vestibule, we don;t get that much rain in the SW for that long. the Tyvek with a vestibule would be perfect for summer, with the occasional Monsoons.

Jim Colten
(jcolten) - M

Locale: MN
dedicated TarpTent poles: New TT Sublite Sil 2010 on 05/12/2010 05:53:31 MDT Print View

BTW, do keep in mind that as Miguel has pointed out , trekking poles, in general , are much stronger than the std tent poles , so don't expect the Contrail to stand up with the 2 oz Easton in strong wind as it would with a good trekking pole. So whilst I have had the Contrail up in somewhat exposed areas using the BD pole, I would not do that with the 2 oz Easton.

A suggestion for HS TarpTent users who don't use trekking poles.

Henry sells poles made from the lightest Easton pole stock (344" x .019" wall, .023 lbs/ft) ... as is fitting for a product targeting UL hikers. Under the tension needed for a taut pitch these poles are pushed to the threshold of bowing ... which is the point where wind concerns really start to kick in.

The next larger Easton pole stock (.355" x .025" wall,.030 lbs/ft) is much much much stiffer ... difficult to make bow, at the cost of about 0.4oz (12 grams) of additional weight for the 45 inch pole needed for the Contrail (not a terrible penalty in a 26oz shelter). I use a pair of these with a RainShadow 2 when canoe camping and have been very satisfied with the results.

Folks not having a local source of Easton poles can order them from TA Enterprises as suggested in Henry's original MYOG TarpTent plans.

Edited by jcolten on 05/12/2010 05:56:11 MDT.

carl becker
(carlbecker) - F

Locale: Northern Virginia
sublite on 05/12/2010 06:33:13 MDT Print View

I have a Sublite tyvek. I choose it over the Contrail or Moment because of the weight, two pole and side entry. With out a bear box for the pack and food I plan to use the pack as part of the sleeping insulation. It is a very cool tent in the desert and just enough room. I can sit up easily inside. I am 6' and 200 pounds. I did rip the corner where the zippers come together but duck tape has fixed that. Maybe a bigger radius would make it easier to get a go seal. I like the design of the sil Sublite but I think the tyvek is close to perfect for lighter rain protection and complete bug protection. I use GG trekking poles for setup.

John McAlpine
(HairlessApe) - M

Locale: PNW
THANKS YOU on 05/12/2010 08:45:30 MDT Print View

THANKS to eveyone for your input. This is the most difficult decision....which tent to buy. I've looked at them all. We have a local rep here in Seattle that allowed me a look at the Lunar Solo. I liked all the space, especially for the pack or dog, but the surface area will gather condensation. That's what brought me to Tarptent. The Rainbow looks awesome, but weighs 34 oz and I here it's a pain to seal.

Peter Longobardi
(paintplongo) - F

Locale: Hopefully on the Trail
Silly on 05/12/2010 08:47:53 MDT Print View

You silly gooses...

The poles aren't going to snap/bend while setup with the shelter. They're going to snap or bend when you're using them hiking. I'm not saying that it will happen, but there's a decent chance of having it happen.

ben wood
(benwood)

Locale: flatlands of MO
Re: New TT Sublite Sil 2010 on 05/12/2010 09:16:10 MDT Print View

that's funny franco -

Miguel Arboleda
(butuki) - MLife

Locale: Kanto Plain, Japan
Re: Silly on 05/12/2010 09:30:46 MDT Print View

@ Peter,

I think quite a few of us here have enough long-term experience to know how hiking poles fare when walking. I'm not sure your argument isn't a little silly in it's own right. Regular tent poles have just as much chance of breaking while in their sleeves in a heavy wind. If you're so worried about your hiking pole breaking, just use a stronger one. You can get hiking poles that are very robust.

With your argument you might as well not get out there, since you could very well break your leg, too, no?

Now that's silly! I'm just saying.