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Jeff K
(jeff.k) - F

Locale: New York
Re: stoves on 05/04/2010 19:36:37 MDT Print View

You mentioned the ti-tri and alcohol, wood, and esbit not working at those temps. I have used Esbit in temps below zero (Fahrenheit) without a problem. I didn't time my boils, so I don't know if it was running at peak efficiency, but I didn't notice any difference. It is probably not the most efficient in terms of boiling lots of water for drinking, but as I was out for just a quick overnighter I was okay carrying a couple extra esbit tabs as I my stove weighed just a couple grams.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: stoves on 05/04/2010 19:47:28 MDT Print View

Actually, wood in a Ti-Tri Caldera would be fine, especially if there is no snow. If you have deep snow, then you will have problems finding any wood twigs. Cold wood is slightly slow to get a fire started, but then it is no problem at all. Often the cook pot on a Ti-Tri is a little on the small side for snow melting, but as long as you have plenty of twigs, you can keep it going.
--B.G.--

James Klein
(jnklein21) - M

Locale: Southeast
sleeping pad on 05/04/2010 20:14:54 MDT Print View

The best warmth to weight ratio will likely be obtained from a DAM. The KookaBay downmats are pretty nice, I have one: 46"X24"X3.5" bender said the rvalue was ~6.1 (maybe 6.5?)w/ inflation sack I think its ~13ozs. In my opinion you would want about that much for subzero temps. Though, as Bob mentioned, you do run the risk of putting a hole in it and (unless you can repair the hole) rendering nearly useless. For that reason I'll likely carry a lightweight foam mat with it.
Could you get by w/ R5, probably, I once "slept" on a zlite in the mid to high twenties using a 32F synthetic bag, I then purchased a BA Insulated Air core. After trying that down to 0F I bought DAM. Sleeping mats and bags work together, so a warmer pad will mean you can use a lighter sleeping bag and vice versa but it is still probably more weight efficient to try to match each to the expected condititions instead of letting one compensate for the other.
James

Sanad Toukhly
(Red_Fox) - MLife

Locale: South Florida
Re: sleeping pad on 05/04/2010 20:28:52 MDT Print View

James,
a DAM seems to have a much more aggressive weight to warmth ratio than a CCF pad if the R value Bender gave you is accurate. I will probably end up getting a light DAM and combine it with a CCF pad.

-Sid

Sanad Toukhly
(Red_Fox) - MLife

Locale: South Florida
Shoes on 05/04/2010 20:29:33 MDT Print View

Any advice on footwear?

Waterproof or non-waterproof?

-Sid

James Klein
(jnklein21) - M

Locale: Southeast
footwear on 05/05/2010 10:03:26 MDT Print View

I've only used wp/b leather boots in the cold. I didn't need insulated boots only a thick pair of wool socks.

I've just switched to non-wp/b trail runners for 3 season hiking and plan to try some of the ideas describing in the 3 part series for colder weather:
http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/lightweight_footwear_systems_for_snow_travel_part_1.html
(I only liked to the first part)

I think at a minimum you would want a goretex sock (possibly neoprene) with trail runners, warm socks and gaiters

Sanad Toukhly
(Red_Fox) - MLife

Locale: South Florida
Re: footwear on 05/06/2010 17:31:01 MDT Print View

James,
great idea, non-waterproof shoes, but WP/B socks. I thinks this will probably suit me best. I will have to look into some Neoprene or Goretex socks. I'm also looking at RBH Vapor Barrier socks.

I will probably also utilize some UL WP gaiters.

-Sid

Edited by Red_Fox on 05/06/2010 17:32:54 MDT.

Stephen Klassen
(SteveYK)
Alpine? on 05/14/2010 00:51:36 MDT Print View

What do you mean by "alpine"?

Are you going to have access to water, or will you be melting snow?

Sounds like you will be on snow. Since you don't seem to use poles, I assume you won't be on skis. What snowshoes are you going to be using? Or will you be using crampons?

Also, sounds like you will need an ice ax. Snowshoes slide a lot easier than skis. Do you know how to self-arrest? With snow shoes or cramons on? Will the gloves hold up to long sidehilling with an ice ax in hand?

What are you doing for navigation? Any experience travelling in a whiteout? Is your clothing system capable of keeping you warm enough if you get pinned down? In particular, I have concerns about your gloves, and footwear. The mitts will work well when not moving, but too warm (wet) if used while moving. I don't know how one would keep their feet warm without heavy boots, synthetic booties, or down booties with a dryloft shell.

If not on the East Coast, will you be in avalanche terrain? If so, what training do you have, what beacon/probe/shovel? Have you considered an avalung, avalung pack, or airbag?

Are you going to be on glaciers/icefields? Are you taking rope, harness, prussiks? Have you practiced crevasse rescue? Any training on travelling while roped up? Do you have a helmet?

Other than the feet and the gloves, I think the clothing system could work. But it depends on what you mean by alpine.

Edited by SteveYK on 05/14/2010 00:52:19 MDT.