Kelly Kettle - Great stove idea
Display Avatars Sort By:
David Lewis
(davidlewis) - MLife

Locale: Nova Scotia, Canada
Kelly Kettle - Great stove idea on 05/30/2006 20:07:53 MDT Print View

Leave it too Lee Valley Tools to find something totally freekin' cool!!!! Has anyone ever heard of a Kelly Kettle?! Apparently they have been around forever. It's a double-walled kettle with chimney in the center. Hard to explain... easy to understand when you see it...



Wow!!! Brilliant! If only they made a 16 oz version out of Ti!!! I mean... all most of us lightweighters use a stove for is to heat water... we don't need an open top vessel for cooking.

I've been racking my brain trying to think how to build something like this... but I'm coming up empty... so I put it to the group :)

Here's the Lee Valley Tools page for the Kelly Kettle.

Edited by davidlewis on 05/30/2006 20:10:10 MDT.

paul johnson
(pj) - F

Locale: LazyBoy in my Den - miss the forest
Re: Kelly Kettle - Great stove idea on 05/30/2006 20:31:10 MDT Print View

Have one - the smaller size. Relatively heavy and takes up a bit of space in the pack. Plenty of fuel everywhere. Small twigs (easy to cut using pruning shears - borrowed this idea from Dr.J), pine cones, dry leaves. Never timed heating water. Only used mine a few times. Heard about it from Dr.J who apparently likes his.

Vick Hines
(vickrhines) - F

Locale: Central Texas
Re: Kelly Kettle - Great stove idea on 05/31/2006 16:08:11 MDT Print View

Yeah, David, These puppies HAVE been around forever. You used to be able to get them (maybe still can)in N. Africa where they are called 'volcanos' and are made of tinned copper - and soldered with lead, of course.

If you are experimental and good with metal, I'll bet you could make one with aluminum using rolled seams sealed with food-grade rubber adhesive - like a tin can. Temperatures would be within its operating range as long as the kettle never went dry.

David Lewis
(davidlewis) - MLife

Locale: Nova Scotia, Canada
Re: Re: Kelly Kettle - Great stove idea on 05/31/2006 18:11:41 MDT Print View

It is a brilliant design idea... but I'm not as excited about it now as I was last night... I just realized that with this type of stove... I would lose all the multi-use capabilities of my beer can stove... I'd lose my cereal bowl, tea cup and water pail!!! Can't have that. I like my 4-in-1 stove :)

Edited by davidlewis on 05/31/2006 18:13:17 MDT.

Jason Klass
(jasonklass) - F

Locale: Parker, CO
Re: Re: Re: Kelly Kettle - Great stove idea on 05/31/2006 18:49:23 MDT Print View

Good point David! Besides, it's waaaay too heavy. I agree, clever design but impractical.

David Lewis
(davidlewis) - MLife

Locale: Nova Scotia, Canada
Re: Re: Re: Re: Kelly Kettle - Great stove idea on 06/03/2006 06:32:35 MDT Print View

Oh... I would never use it as is. I think you could cut some weight off of it... the first things that come to mind are the cork, chain and heavy bail and wooden handle... but it would still be heavy... unless you wanted to go one step further and cut 1/4 right off the top of the thing... but that might compomise the sturdiness of the pot. My thought was more about... this is a neat idea... I wonder if we can use this idea to build something similar that is lighter in weight.

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
Re: Kelly Kettle - on 06/03/2006 18:45:12 MDT Print View

Great idea. I have used a version of the Kelly in NZ for car camping, it was ,from memory, at least a 1.5L possibly a 2L version. It was fast and efficient, came to a roaring boil in five minutes or so (?) with not much more than a few twigs.
Someone should make a titanium version, around 700ml (24oz) capacity. I think that the walls could be rather thin providing there is water inside at all times.For freezer bag cooking it could be ideal on a 5 to 10 day cold weather trip. Can someone work out the weight required to be more efficient than canister or alcohol stoves? ( for 2 people, around 6 pints per day)
Franco

Ryan Jordan
(ryan) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Greater Yellowstone
Re: Re: Kelly Kettle - on 06/05/2006 10:23:33 MDT Print View

I love the Kelly Kettle. Mine has a 16 oz reservoir, and the kettle itself weighs about (stock weight) is 20 ounces. If you hack off the chain, cork, and handle, you end up at around 18 ounces.

But you have to add back some wire for a handle and a piece of wire to replace the chain. I've used piano wire (total added back is 0.2 oz). These two pieces are useful for pouring water out of the kettle, and of course, toting it around.

The main disadvantage of the KK is the volume. It's big and takes a lot of room in the pack. But heck, most of us have room to spare in our packs, so...not a huge deal.

The KK will be featured in BPL's upcoming Wood Stove Review Summary which will appear later this summer, alongside a whole bunch of other wood stove designs, all of them commercially available.

Of the entire lot that is being tested, the KK far and away uses (1) the least amount of fuel, (2) burns wood most efficiently (ie to ash), and (3) burns the most different types of wood efficiently. I think it's the best designed wood cooker available for really crappy, wet, fuel sources. 3-5 minute boil times per pint are not at all unreasonable with the KK.

If it wasn't so darned big, and heavy, I'd consider taking it on my Arctic trek. However, I'm in need of something more compact and that will work with a conventional pot that will hold more prodigious quantities of food, which of course, the KK can't do - it's strictly a water boiler.

So instead, I'll be taking a 4 oz double wall, stainless wood gas stove that nests nicely into a 0.9L Snowpeak ti pot that is nearly as efficient as the KK but a whole lot lighter and smaller. More on that one soon enough, but here it is in action:

Ryan Jordan's Double Walled Wood Gas / Woodfire Cook Stove for Arctic 1000 Trek

Edited by ryan on 06/05/2006 10:24:57 MDT.

Joshua Mitchell
(jdmitch) - F

Locale: Kansas
Double Wall SS Woodgas Stove? on 06/05/2006 15:36:55 MDT Print View

A new item for the store? Or a review of a manufacturers current model?

Ryan Faulkner
(ryanf) - F

Locale: Mid atlantic, No. Cal
Re: Double Wall SS Woodgas Stove? on 06/05/2006 16:55:33 MDT Print View

or a DIY stove?

We need details :-)

Jason Smith
(JasonS) - MLife

Locale: Northeast
Re: Re: Double Wall SS Woodgas Stove? on 06/05/2006 20:28:27 MDT Print View

I'm with Ryan here :-)

Miguel Arboleda
(butuki) - MLife

Locale: Kanto Plain, Japan
Re: Double Wall SS Woodgas Stove? on 06/06/2006 10:39:56 MDT Print View

From what I can make out in the photo the stove looks remarkably like the now defunct BushBuddy CookStove, a commercial attempt in 1999 at bringing the inverted downdraft gassifier wood burning stove to hikers. It just looks a little stumpy for an inverted downdraft gassifier (woodgas stove) though. How exactly is there enough depth to the stove to allow the wood to gassify? I'm very curious about this stove.

Photobucket - Video and Image Hosting

Edited by butuki on 06/06/2006 10:41:42 MDT.

Joshua Mitchell
(jdmitch) - F

Locale: Kansas
Bushbuddy on 06/06/2006 13:15:19 MDT Print View

Miguel,

Nice catch, the stove does appear to have similar physical designs as that 500 series. However, if you notice the stand is different from the pick that... however that doesn't mean someone, somewhere hasn't resurrected the device.

I, too, am curious to stumpy's ability to truly gassify wood... but maybe combine with a vortexing airflow (though it doesn't appear to sport such) it does gassify. Or, maybe it simply partially gassifies in order to achieve better combustion effeciency than a normal stove, though not as effecient as a true IDDWG stove.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Kelly Kettle - on 06/08/2006 04:32:58 MDT Print View

> Someone should make a titanium version, around 700ml (24oz) capacity. I think that the walls could be rather thin providing there is water inside at all times

Actually, Ryan had us look at that one. Um ... YOU try welding or seam-rolling titanium! This is NOT a metal you can easily play around with. Sigh.

David Lewis
(davidlewis) - MLife

Locale: Nova Scotia, Canada
Re: Re: Re: Kelly Kettle - on 06/08/2006 05:19:46 MDT Print View

Still... a small aluminum version could be made much lighter I think.

Bill Fornshell
(bfornshell) - MLife

Locale: Southern Texas
Kelly Kettle - Great stove idea on 06/08/2006 05:41:24 MDT Print View

Roger Caffin said:
"Actually, Ryan had us look at that one. Um ... YOU try welding or seam-rolling titanium! This is NOT a metal you can easily play around with. Sigh."

Reply:
I have played with round wood stoves but I wanted one I could fold flat. A Titanium version of what ever is in the pictire would not be that hard to make. To bad the picture doesn't show more detail or I might show you how easy it would be to make one out of Titanium.

It is just like working with Cuben Fiber. Just think a little and work around its negatives.

David Lewis
(davidlewis) - MLife

Locale: Nova Scotia, Canada
Re: Kelly Kettle - Great stove idea on 06/08/2006 08:56:56 MDT Print View

What picture Bill? There are three pictures in the thread. The rolled seams with Ti comment was specific, I believe, to making a Kelly Kettle... as shown in the first post.

Edited by davidlewis on 06/08/2006 08:59:02 MDT.

Bill Fornshell
(bfornshell) - MLife

Locale: Southern Texas
Kelly Kettle - Great stove idea on 06/08/2006 09:05:04 MDT Print View

David,
The picture I am refereing to is from Ryan's post dated:
SUBJECT Re: Re: Kelly Kettle - ON 06/05/2006 10:23:33 MDT

[It is the eight post in this thread.]
He talks about the stove as:

"So instead, I'll be taking a 4 oz double wall, stainless wood gas stove that nests nicely into a 0.9L Snowpeak ti pot that is nearly as efficient as the KK but a whole lot lighter and smaller. More on that one soon enough, but here it is in action:"

Joshua Mitchell
(jdmitch) - F

Locale: Kansas
Never though of a flat gassifier... on 06/08/2006 13:03:22 MDT Print View

It could work, though... and be simpler / more controlled than hacking up some of the snowpeak single wall cups (http://www.snowpeak.com/gears/mg001.htm)

Reginald Donaldson
(worth) - MLife

Locale: Wind River Range
I like my KK on 06/09/2006 16:24:36 MDT Print View

I have used the smaller one on wilderness canoe trips into the Canadian bush for several years and have been quite please until last year. We were in the transition zone for the tundra and it rained every day. The river was severely flooded. It was hard to find dry land. Everything was wet. It was extremely difficult to find dry wood. Even the dead stuff standing was wet all the way through. The only way you could start a fire was by splitting wood to get to the center. My kettle was useless for most of the trip. I now recommend having a backup.