recommendation for a windy wet weather tent
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Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: Hilleberg on 04/27/2010 08:22:24 MDT Print View

If you're convinced on Hilleberg, I've got a Nallo2 GT, never used, I'd be happy to sell. If interested, PM me and let me know....

Lynn Tramper
(retropump) - F

Locale: The Antipodes of La Coruna
Re: Hilleberg on 04/27/2010 14:35:43 MDT Print View

Yup, go with the Nallo2, provided you're not a really tall person...

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: Hilleberg on 04/27/2010 14:43:31 MDT Print View

IMO, the Allak is too much tent and too much weight for one. I would go with the freestanding Soulo -- or the Nallo 2 if you crave a lot of space.

Siggy Chaloupka
(soccer_boy_siggy)
how strong is the nallo2? does it require too much pegging? on 04/28/2010 06:27:23 MDT Print View

who has used the nallo2 in tremendous winds? how sturdy is it?

typically, is the nallo2 hard to peg out say on stoney grounds? (this is why i was leaning more toward a self standing Allak or something similar)

Siggy Chaloupka
(soccer_boy_siggy)
quick question on 04/29/2010 00:00:57 MDT Print View

has anyone seen the Vaude Hogan Ultralight?
Has anyone had any experience with this tent? it does seem very lightweight....but does it seriously sacrifice strength for weight?

Miguel Arboleda
(butuki) - MLife

Locale: Kanto Plain, Japan
Re: how strong is the nallo2? does it require too much pegging? on 04/29/2010 01:32:24 MDT Print View

Nallo 2 in Storm

Some Nallo 2's in storms videos (a quick, 2-minute search is all it takes):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=73KKZDhoj_0

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qBwDOBSBnlA&NR=1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fhpl5p75DXE&feature=related

Thomas Gauperaa
(gauperaa) - F - M

Locale: Norway
Re: Re: how strong is the nallo2? does it require too much pegging? on 04/29/2010 01:52:19 MDT Print View

Chris Townsend has used the Nallo 2 a lot. here's a quote from
http://newsgroups.derkeiler.com/Archive/Uk/uk.rec.walking/2005-08/msg01608.html

"Having used various Hilleberg tunnels extensively, including on snow camping trips in very stormy places (Greenland, Spitsbergen) and, with a Nallo 2, for a walk the length of Norway and Sweden I can say that pitched properly they are very taut."

So yes, I believe they're pretty bomber :)

Edit: i don't think the tent in the first video was pitched correctly

Edited by gauperaa on 04/29/2010 01:56:43 MDT.

Miguel Arboleda
(butuki) - MLife

Locale: Kanto Plain, Japan
Re: how strong is the nallo2? does it require too much pegging? on 04/29/2010 02:26:56 MDT Print View

i don't think the tent in the first video was pitched correctly

No, true, but it still held up well! :-)

Robert Blean
(blean) - MLife

Locale: San Jose -- too far from Sierras
Re: Re: Hilleberg on 04/29/2010 03:10:40 MDT Print View

IMO, the Allak is too much tent and too much weight for one.

Ben,

I understand "too much weight", but what do you mean by "too much tent"?

--MV

Edited by blean on 04/29/2010 03:34:34 MDT.

Rolf Exner
(rolfex) - M

Locale: Melbourne
Hogan Ultralight on 04/29/2010 03:21:32 MDT Print View

"has anyone seen the Vaude Hogan Ultralight?
Has anyone had any experience with this tent? it does seem very lightweight....but does it seriously sacrifice strength for weight?"

I have this tent, and I've been quite happy with it - quick to set up, sufficiently roomy for two, waterproof, and warm (no mesh for the inner). Be aware that there are two versions that are easily confused with one another - a slightly bigger and heavier one sometimes called the Ultralight 2, with a height of 105cm and an advertised weight of 1700g, and the Ultralight 1 at 95cm and 1500g. I have the bigger one. I think the smaller would be too small for two (that's probably why it's called the '1').

One disappointment for me with the tent was that the weight was seriously understated. Instead of 1700g, the trail weight is 1950g, so it's not as light as I'd hoped. I imagine the same is true of the '1', so be warned.

The other issue relates to its performance in strong winds. It has a pole design like the MSR Hubba Hubba but without a crosspole, i.e. a single ridge pole from front to back, so a side wind will really bend the tent unless you fully stake it out. As it turned out, the only serious wind I encountered was when pitched on a rock platform, and finding suitable rocks to weight down the side guy lines was a struggle (my previous tents have all been fully self supported). Would I take it to Tassie? Only if I could be assured of being able to pitch it in reasonably wind sheltered locations. I trust its waterproofness, but I'm not so sure about the Tassie westerlies.

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Allak on 04/29/2010 07:56:24 MDT Print View

"IMO, the Allak is too much tent and too much weight for one. I would go with the freestanding Soulo -- or the Nallo 2 if you crave a lot of space."

The Allak actually has a much better space to weight ratio than the Soulo and more usable space and better ventilation options than the Nallo.

Jason Elsworth
(jephoto) - M

Locale: New Zealand
Power lizard on 04/29/2010 16:59:39 MDT Print View

The Vaude Power Lizard maybe isn't as storm worthy as you would like, but it looks v.interesting at only 1 Kg.

http://www.vaude.com/epages/Vaude-de.sf/?ObjectPath=/Shops/Vaude/Products/10265/SubProducts/102655050&Locale=en_NL&NavSignature=5,5,4

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: Allak on 04/29/2010 17:12:18 MDT Print View

David:

Two-person tents will usually have better space to weight ratios than solo tents. But that doesn't mean a solo camper should automatically carry a heavier two-person tent.

The Allak has many fine attributes -- but I wouldn't recommend anyone hauling a 5-6 pound tent all around the world for solo use!

Edited by ben2world on 04/29/2010 17:16:46 MDT.

Steven McAllister
(brooklynkayak) - MLife

Locale: Atlantic North East
Another option on 04/29/2010 17:34:29 MDT Print View

If you don't want the ultralight options, consider the Montbell Crescent series. The two person tent is a bit tight for two, but roomy for one plus gear.

It is extremely good in strong, wet winds and lighter and roomier than tents other people have mentioned earlier.

I was using the Crescent 2 on the beach off the tip of Montauk, Long Island, NY during a hurricane. It was hard to stand up under such conditions.
I ended up hanging my wet clothing inside.

I was the only one who not only had a good night sleep, no flapping of tent walls, but also woke totally dry, with my hanging clothing almost totally dry as well.

Others were kept awake by the flapping and/or spray coming in.

It has a lower roof than some of the others, the price you pay for a very wind shedding design. It does have enough room to sit up and read.

A good part of the reason for it's ability to shed bad weather is that it has something like 15 tie down points. The additional stakes and line add weight, but this is something you want if you think the winds will be that strong.

I want to emphasize that it is very quite in strong winds. I visited others in their more expensive Scandinavian tents and what a difference. A much better nights sleep was had by me. The walls of the other tents sounded like drums a pounding, while mine didn't seem to deflect more than a few inches and the wind just seemed to avoid my tent altogether.

PS. I do believe that the popular tunnel and dome 4 season tents can hold up to extreme conditions well, but they tend to keep you awake with their thumping all night in strong winds.

Edited by brooklynkayak on 04/29/2010 17:54:38 MDT.

Siggy Chaloupka
(soccer_boy_siggy)
hrmmmm....so tough to decide! on 04/29/2010 17:49:47 MDT Print View

Yeh, i checked out the Montbell Crescent2, its fine sizewise.....im only 5' 5".....so i can fit most tents fine.
Yeh the reason i had a tough time with the Allak and Nallo, is because i plan to use it also in tropical monsoon conditions as well....and for that...well, the Allak has awesome ventilation.

What i think i may do, is when im at work....ill get the list of tents we stock (cos i get a sweet 50% off the rrp)....I'll list them here...and see what people think of them.

If not, then....i guess Hilleberg it might be! Too bad, no one stocks them here, so i have to pay full price and shipping....argh, what a pain in the backside!

Steven McAllister
(brooklynkayak) - MLife

Locale: Atlantic North East
Tough to decide on 04/29/2010 18:04:05 MDT Print View

From my experience, the Crescent 2 not only impressed me with the way it seemed to be unphased by the wind, but that it seemed to have better ventilation than the Hillibergs. One side can be pitched with much more ventilation, which makes a difference in a tropical monsoon situation.

I have also used this tent in freezing weather and although it wasn't as warm as the Hilibergs I've tried, it was obviously better ventilated. This is something I want in warmer weather.

Steven McAllister
(brooklynkayak) - MLife

Locale: Atlantic North East
Pyramid on 04/29/2010 18:20:40 MDT Print View

Another note,

Although i think the Montabell Crescent 2 is superior to the Hillibergs for your situation, I personally would go with a pyramid floorless design with an added bivy or bathtub bug net.
I find pyramids excellent at shedding bad weather and they can be lighter, well ventilated and with more headroom. The bathtub bug net can take care of extremely wet and buggy conditions and you have more flexibility. Something like the MLD Duomid with net tent or others come to mind.

I personally use the Gossamer Spinnshelter with a meteor bivy in extreme situations lately, but it seems to scare others, so I don't want you to think I encourage it:-)

Mind you, I am not an expert.

Siggy Chaloupka
(soccer_boy_siggy)
yup, but i hate bivvies on 04/29/2010 18:57:48 MDT Print View

i really do prefer a tent with a floor. But again, it all depends on the price. I'll list what we stock in the shop's inventory.....cos i would really like to cash in on a good staff discount.

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: MontBell Crescent on 04/29/2010 19:07:26 MDT Print View

The MB Crescent is a "hybrid" single wall / double wall tent. No direct experience with this particular model (except I know MB makes first-rate quality gear) but I would recommend using these hybrid tents in temperate climes with low to moderate humidity.

1. High winds. Similar to single wall tarptents using non-breathable fabrics -- the Crescent relies on ventilation all around to manage condensation. But in high winds, this can make for a very drafty and uncomfortable tent in harsh winds -- and esp. in harsh and cold winds. And if you block the mesh significantly, then you are faced with potentially serious condensation. Double wall tents, you are much, much better protected from winds blowing directly in.

2. High Humidity -- Again, condensation is the problem here. Sure, double wall tents get condensation too -- but on the fly and safely out of reach. Not so for tents like the Crescent -- which doesn't have a lot of room for the user to stay clear when sitting up and changing clothes, etc.

Great tent for certain locale and temps -- but if OP is looking for one tent to take "anywhere" -- then I would recommend against this hybrid (as well as any single wall tent or tarptent made with non-breathable fabrics).

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: Re: MontBell Crescent on 04/29/2010 20:21:40 MDT Print View

Remember, as far as ventilation, you can get a mesh inner to replace the fabric inner on the Nallo 2.