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Cooking Fish - Ultralight Style
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Joshua Mitchell
(jdmitch) - F

Locale: Kansas
Re: Re: Another (untried) idea on 03/13/2008 14:59:03 MDT Print View

"West Coasters famously do this with whole Salmon in the dishwasher. Comes out perfectly, no cleanup. "

Wha...?!?

Wow... that's pretty cool.

William Herron
(Samoset) - F
Lot of great remarks. Heres my two pennys on 05/31/2009 01:12:39 MDT Print View

I simply cook cleand fish over open fire by running a stick through the gills and out the mouth I cook fish with a variety of spices lots of times just oliveoil and salt and pepper. Dont forget to reposition fish often fish cook fast. I have cooked 4 fish at the same time this way on the same (SPIT)stick. and they came out evenly cooked and delisous and I still had my cook pot clean for brewing coco or what have you.

Don McChristian
(DonMcJr) - F

Locale: Michigan
Boy Scout Mess Kit on 06/28/2015 01:49:57 MDT Print View

I use a boy scout mess kits it's light and has a pan and I bring a bottle I fill with olive oil and seasonings...

Yuri R
(Yazon) - F

Locale: www.TenkaraPro.com
Re: trout batter on 06/28/2015 15:30:09 MDT Print View

- a chef buddy turned me on to something as simple as Kosher salt. I will NeVeR use iodine again.


What? Iodine is one of the essential elements humans need. Granted we don't have to get it from salt these days since there are other foods that contain some iodine, but there is not much wrong with using iodized salt on the table. It may not always be right for cooking, but as table salt it's perfectly fine. On the other hand good luck eating your omelet with coarse kosher salt on it.

NJ Drew
(njdrew) - F
my recipe on 07/05/2015 14:05:58 MDT Print View

I prefer to "steam" my fish when I'm cooking fish in the back country and I use a recipe I found online years ago:

This recipe was for 2 lbs of white fish, but works great for trout:

4 tbs of butter (use 4tbs olive oil instead)
1 tsp dill weed
1/2 tsp onion powder
1/2 tsp garlic powder
1/2 tsp salt
1/4 tsp pepper

In 2 x 1 lb fish portions, you need 2 tbs oil to 1/2 tbs dry mix

Packing: Mix all dry contents together in one zip lock back and bring olive oil in a separate bottle. I use tin foil instead of a pan to save weight when I can campfire cook and a few zip lock backs for prep. If your multiplying the recipe for extra fish bring a measuring spoon.

Cooking: mix dry and olive oil in a zip lock bag, put fish in it to coat the outside of the fish. For Campfire: Take the fish out and put in tin foil, rolling the sides of the tin foil to keep steam in. For campfire: Hot rock the fish on the side of the fire until cooked. For Stove: you would need a pan or pot lid to fry instead of steam.

Adam Klagsbrun
(klags) - MLife

Locale: Northeast US
Smelly fish garbage on 08/10/2015 12:59:33 MDT Print View

I find that the most important thing in this equation is not how to cook it, but how to cook it in a way that doesn't create smelly fish garbage. This will help GREATLY reduce the likelihood of you coming into contact with a bear that can and will smell your fishy garbage...

Any method using foil or wrap, bags or pouches that get thrown out or make contact with fish are, IMHO, useless in the backcountry.

If fires are allowed where you are camping, I recommend the stick method. Gut your fish, create a bed of coals, and just insert the stick into the head, with the remaining lower part of the fish hanging over the stick, tail at the bottom. Soaking your stick in water for a while, or simply taking one that has been submerged in the stream you fish would be ideal to reduce the risk of burning.

No prep work is required other than gutting the fish. You can burn the skin (if you don't eat it) and the skeleton and stick in the fire to help with no smelly leftovers for the bears.

I also like the simple method of putting a little bit of water, olive oil and salt/herbs into your normal backpacking pot or pan and just steaming it. Fish cooks in just a few minutes, its really easy. You can drink the remaining liquid or just pour it over rice.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Smelly fish garbage on 08/10/2015 16:10:05 MDT Print View

"I also like the simple method of putting a little bit of water, olive oil and salt/herbs into your normal backpacking pot or pan and just steaming it. Fish cooks in just a few minutes, its really easy. You can drink the remaining liquid or just pour it over rice."

This method works really well, as also adding chunks of fish to soups, like Thai Kitchen. Easy to clean up afterward, and the fish bones can either be chewed thoroughly and swallowed, or buried deep, preferably under a boulder. Where fires were permitted, I used to wrap fish in foil, bake over a bed of coals, then turn the foil inside out and place it in the fire to burn the residue, leaving odorless foil with a slight carbon residue, which could be rolled up into a tight little ball and packed out with the rest of my garbage. Larger bones were also burnt to an odorless crisp and disposed of with the remains of the fire.

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
Re: Re: Smelly fish garbage on 08/10/2015 17:42:30 MDT Print View

>"Larger bones were also burnt to an odorless crisp and disposed of with the remains of the fire."

+1

I'd agree that a hot fire can eliminate food odors quite well. Although that can be hard to do in a campfire on the ground - so often there are cold spots to the sides. On a recent boating trip, I brought a charcoal-lighting chimney and man!, that thing made a hot, hot fire. Far less wood made a nice, mini-campfire for warming and some grilling (asparagus in olive oil and spices). Anything dropped in the chimney got completely combusted or mineralized. One wouldn't carry that on a backpacking trip, but a Vargo Hexagon Wood Stove, operated on more wood for a while after you added food scraps would do a great job of combusting everything. On that recent trip, we were definitely in bear country - some of the food scraps I was burning up were bear.

>"wrap fish in foil"

-1

I'm a little hesitant about aluminum foil because when burning the smells out, it can oxide to brittle aluminum oxide and be very hard to pick out of the ashes. How about a dedicated titanium plate? It would take very high heat without damage, and any smells could be "burned out" without generating any more garbage - you'd just use the plate again, as a plate and a fry pan, for later meals.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: Re: Smelly fish garbage on 08/10/2015 17:57:55 MDT Print View

"I'd agree that a hot fire can eliminate food odors quite well. Although that can be hard to do in a campfire on the ground - so often there are cold spots to the sides."

We dealt with that issue by gathering the refuse into the center of the fire and adding more fuel on top. It took a little more wood, but effectively combusted everything.



"I'm a little hesitant about aluminum foil because when burning the smells out, it can oxide to brittle aluminum oxide and be very hard to pick out of the ashes. How about a dedicated titanium plate? It would take very high heat without damage, and any smells could be "burned out" without generating any more garbage - you'd just use the plate again, as a plate and a fry pan, for later meals."

A legitimate point. We were pretty thorough in sifting thru the ashes for exactly that reason, but I'm guessing we occasionally missed a bit or two. It was buried deep, but still, miniscule bits likely stayed behind, out of sight, but behind, nnetheless. A titanium plate sounds like an excellent way to avoid that issue entirely. I wish we had known about titanium back in the 70's-80's. :9(

David Thomas
(DavidinKenai) - MLife

Locale: North Woods. Far North.
Re: Re: Re: Re: Smelly fish garbage on 08/10/2015 18:15:28 MDT Print View

>"I wish we had known about titanium back in the 70's-80's. :9("

Yeah, you couldn't just buy titanium gear at REI. You had to hike way into an SR-71 Blackbird crash site, salvage some bits. . . .

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Smelly fish garbage on 08/10/2015 20:26:16 MDT Print View

"You had to hike way into an SR-71 Blackbird crash site, salvage some bits. . . ."

:0)