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Cuben Fiber Hammock
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Lawson Kline
(Mountainfitter) - M

Locale: LawsonEquipment.com
Testing Failure on 04/13/2010 16:06:13 MDT Print View

I have tested it to 450lbs and the only failure was when the knot slipped on the paracord dumping all the occupants haha...

One thing I forgot to mention was how flat a cuben hammock lays... You lay flatter which is better for people with bad backs...Input came from my brother who has 3 herniated discs in his back..

I personally don't find nylon hammock sleeping comfortable but I do with a cuben one...

Edited by Mountainfitter on 04/13/2010 22:14:34 MDT.

Dan Durston
(dandydan) - M

Locale: Cascadia
Color on 04/13/2010 16:27:11 MDT Print View

Do you know what color of cuben this is? Ie. What is the name of the color? It looks like a great shade of green and I may be calling Cubic Tech to order a bunch soon.

Also, do you know if I can just call Cubic Tech and ask for the 0.75oz stuff, or is there a ton of different types all at about the same weight?

Edited by dandydan on 04/13/2010 16:30:52 MDT.

john Tier
(Peter_pan) - M

Locale: Co-Owner Jacks 'R' Better, LLC, VA
Weight Check on 04/13/2010 18:05:45 MDT Print View

Tom,

Review the fine print .... That material actually weighs 1.05 oz...Some may actually be still higher...In any case the weight difference to 1.1 DWR is more like 0.05 to 0.1 oz.... So a typical wide gathered end hammock of nominally 10 feet savings will be more like...0.25 oz total than the estimate in your post.

Pan

john Tier
(Peter_pan) - M

Locale: Co-Owner Jacks 'R' Better, LLC, VA
Data Check on 04/13/2010 18:11:04 MDT Print View

Duplicate post removed... oops.

Pan

Edited by Peter_pan on 04/13/2010 18:14:31 MDT.

Lawson Kline
(Mountainfitter) - M

Locale: LawsonEquipment.com
Hammock on 04/13/2010 21:11:36 MDT Print View

I am planning to bring this bad boy into production within the next week or so.. I will probably blow a few out for cheap then start selling them for around $150+/- depending on sizing and what features I include.. At that price I won't be making much money but I hope the added exposure will help my online gear business a bit. As you can tell I run a very transparent operation..

Bill Fornshell
(bfornshell) - MLife

Locale: Southern Texas
Re: Cuben Fiber Hammock on 04/13/2010 21:35:48 MDT Print View

My Cuben Hammock is over 3 years old and has a lot of use on it and I used the 0.47 ounce per squard Cuben.


Bill's Cuben Hammock

Lawson Kline
(Mountainfitter) - M

Locale: LawsonEquipment.com
Abrasion on 04/13/2010 21:44:16 MDT Print View

Hey Bill,

I saw your hammock a while back. Nice job on it...Do you like how cuben hammocks lay? Is yours hot? How many nights do you have in it? Do you have any abrasion? I promise im not writing a book haha..

Bill Fornshell
(bfornshell) - MLife

Locale: Southern Texas
Re: Abrasion on 04/13/2010 22:23:26 MDT Print View

Hi,

Not sure what you mean by "Do you like how cuben hammocks lay?"

I can get on my side if I want to or lay on my back. My Hammock was made out of Cuben when it was all 48" wide or so and was made as short as I could to keep it as light as possible. The newer Cuben is all wider, I think about 54" or so. I have 5 different weight Cuben Fiber but am happy with the 0.47 ounce Cuben I used.

My weight stays about 156 or so which makes me a bit lighter then so folks so the lighter Cuben has held up great.

I also use a knot on the ends of my Hammock. I think it is easier on the Cuben but you are using a heavier weight Cuben so time will tell.

My first tree straps were some kind of webbing and it would stretch over night a lot and I would end up touching the ground or on the ground by morning. I started using a ground cloth which also gave me something to step on in my socks. I always where socks in my Cuben Gear.

Ending up with part of my backside on the ground a few times never hurt the Cuben but I got ride of the webbing for other tree rope.

I have slept in my Hammock 40 or 50 nights, maybe more. I have a way to hang my hammock in my garage and it stays up most of the time. I have several pet cats. They like to run and play with each other at night. They don't seem to have any concept of time. I go out to the garage on a lot of those nights.

As with all my Cuben gear I try and be careful how I use it.

Edited by bfornshell on 04/13/2010 22:26:45 MDT.

Lawson Kline
(Mountainfitter) - M

Locale: LawsonEquipment.com
hammock on 04/14/2010 08:57:35 MDT Print View

Since the cuben has no stretch you seem to lay really flat compared to nylon hammocks.

Edited by Mountainfitter on 04/14/2010 09:03:17 MDT.

Eric Beaudry
(itbvolks) - F
hammock on 04/16/2010 06:45:26 MDT Print View

I've got to admit, I'm not a hammock guy (yet) but man does that look comfy....


So what would one be looking at for total weight of the hammock (lines, beeners, etc)?

Lawson Kline
(Mountainfitter) - M

Locale: LawsonEquipment.com
Total Weight on 04/16/2010 09:55:55 MDT Print View

I am not sure yet since I have been using paracord. I inquired a few days back about using Amsteel Blue which is a 100% Dyneema Cord and have been searching for lighter weight karabiners.. I think 6oz might be a reachable goal for hammock and rigging. It currently packs down to the size of a grapefruit with rigging..

obx hiker
(obxcola) - MLife

Locale: Outer Banks of North Carolina
total weight on 04/16/2010 10:33:28 MDT Print View

Hello Lawson,

I really like your hammock!

I am curious though ( but not skeptical! ) of what might be the best approach given the discussion on this thread and general experience with cuben to protecting against abrasion or saw-off on the end channels using the thin dyneema cord.

On a related note I have found dyneema climbing slings that are apparently made of hollow or tubular tape so maybe a short stretch of that material might make a good protective Sheath.

Also I have spent/so far wasted a bit of time trying to find a source of lightweight dyneema straps in the 1 inch width range. There are lots of climbing slings available but evidently they are all tubular to provide the guaranteed strength needed for climbing. I'm not sure that a lighter weight strap using or taking advantage of dyneema for a superior strength/weight ratio is currently being produced/manufactured but there certainly is the capability if the tubular sling material is being produced.

This might be another commercial opportunity for someone who put in the time /$ to get an appropriately light/wide ( tree bark protection) dyneema strapping for use in hammocks

Or is there such a thing and I haven't found it or the weight savings aren't that great?

And another new thought. Wonder if you took say a four foot x 4 inch wide strip of cuben; folded and glued it into a 1 inch wide strip and sewed loops on the ends. What sort of load would that bear?

Edited by obxcola on 04/16/2010 11:02:52 MDT.

Ike Mouser
(isaac.mouser) - F
no carabiners needed on 04/16/2010 11:57:02 MDT Print View

use 6 feet of tree hugger, attach whoppie sling on hammock to tree hugger via marlin spike hitch, using trail stick as toggle. No "beener" weight increase.

Lawson Kline
(Mountainfitter) - M

Locale: LawsonEquipment.com
Whoopie Sling on 04/16/2010 12:22:03 MDT Print View

The only concern I have with a whoopie sling is how small of diameter the cord is.. I can break 300 lb test with my bare hands by using the line to cut itself.. I am afraid the 7/64" Amsteel Blue will act as a knife and cut the cuben fiber. I personally think a thicker cord, webbing or a karabiner at the ends makes more sense and would help save the ends.. ?????

Edited by Mountainfitter on 04/16/2010 13:57:43 MDT.

Ike Mouser
(isaac.mouser) - F
lawson on 04/16/2010 12:26:20 MDT Print View

lawson i can assure you, you cannot break amsteel with your hands, and woudl be lucky to with your car. It will not rip the hammock either. I have even thinner line on my hammocks (i weigh 150lbs), i use 2.2 mm dynalgide. But i also put a paracord sheath over it. The 7/64 will cause no damage at all, trust me. I used it extensively for over a year on my blackbirds, no damage at all. I even replaced my hammock ridgeline with dynaglide, when i removed the amsteel ridgeline, i looked to see if there was any abrasion where the line had been cinching down on the hammock...nothing. Everyone is using them, noone has reported abrasion yet. i do not put paracord sheaths over my amsteel, only the dynaglide. If your worried, find a rope with a larger diameter sheath than whatever your using, and sheathe it, problem solved. Or you can jsut double wrap it. IF your REALLY worried you can do also wrap a cusioning fabric around the outside of your bundle before you secure it, then sheathe it, then double wrap it. But that might be a bit excessive! I jsut can justify the biner weight, since the lightest one that is useable is around 23g, the nano 23.

Edited by isaac.mouser on 04/16/2010 12:38:14 MDT.

Lawson Kline
(Mountainfitter) - M

Locale: LawsonEquipment.com
Amsteel Blue on 04/16/2010 14:05:27 MDT Print View

Your right I could never break the Amsteel Blue 7/64" cord even with my truck, but I am afraid the cord could cut the much smaller fibers in the cuben... Maybe a tubular webbing would help out in the channel? But why spend the extra time and money to arrive at the same weight???

obx hiker
(obxcola) - MLife

Locale: Outer Banks of North Carolina
End Channel and amsteel etc on 04/16/2010 14:05:50 MDT Print View

Hi Lawson,

On your photos it looks like you have a double length of a soft looking @ 6mm rope? That shouldn't cut or abrade the fabric

With the smaller amsteel of even smaller dynaglide a sheath might almost certainly be preferable.

Issac you had a conversation w/ Sgt Rock about using paracord with the central cord removed and the difficulty of getting the dynaglide threaded back through the resulting/remaining sheath. Wasn't that you? I was thinking that a length of like an 8 mm dyneema sling might be easier to "thread".

And I'll ask again if anyone knows a source of flat rather than tubular dyneema tape/strap? And if it exists is it significantly lighter?

Also back to the "cuben tree strap" sewn loops would fail and so would glued?

Ike Mouser
(isaac.mouser) - F
cuben on 04/16/2010 14:17:22 MDT Print View

i can rip my nylon hammocks easier than i can my cuben materials.

The weight will not be the same, adding metal hardware will increase it, when you could just sheath it.

It was difficult initially, but once i discovered the proper method (use blue plastic needle or capri sun straw) worked in an instant to sheath the dynaglide.

Edited by isaac.mouser on 04/16/2010 14:24:27 MDT.

Ike Mouser
(isaac.mouser) - F
dynemma webbing on 04/16/2010 14:34:43 MDT Print View

http://www.sturgesstraps.com/html/dyneema_webbing.html

there ya go

obx hiker
(obxcola) - MLife

Locale: Outer Banks of North Carolina
Dyneema straps on 04/16/2010 17:35:53 MDT Print View

Good work Issac!

I found Sturges but not that page. I've emailed and requested info on the lightest strap they make with dyneema that is @ 1 inch wide.

We'll see.

I'm inclined to think a couple of light 2 foot straps might be a good regular set-up as tree huggers if they're light enough with amsteel or dynaglide whoopies/ucr's as a backup if forced to use a larger tree.

By the way isn't it whoopies as in making whoopie not whoppies as in a tale told about fishing?

Oh wait; almost everyone of both sexes tends to tell whoppies about whoopie too don't they?