Where to buy powdered milk in bulk?
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Jason G
(JasonG) - F

Locale: iceberg lake
Where to buy powdered milk in bulk? on 04/08/2010 03:07:40 MDT Print View

I don't have a Costco card.. anyone know of they carry powdered milk? how about walmarts?
other good places?

Jennifer W
(tothetrail) - MLife

Locale: So. Cal.
Re: Where to buy powdered milk in bulk? on 04/08/2010 08:28:12 MDT Print View

Sam's Club in Oxnard, CA carries the large can of Nido.

Jack H.
(Found) - F

Locale: Sacramento, CA
Re: Where to buy powdered milk in bulk? on 04/08/2010 08:39:39 MDT Print View

Any natural foods store in the bay area will sell some in their bulk section. Usually in non-fat, whole milk, soy and rice varieties.

Bill Fornshell
(bfornshell) - MLife

Locale: Southern Texas
Large Nido Can on 04/08/2010 10:48:20 MDT Print View

I use NIDO dry whole milk (fat left in) vs liquid milk. The small light steel can that it comes in is useful for many things - think wood stove. I was in my local Wal Mart a couple of nights ago and they now sell a super size can of Nido. The big can (also light steel) is almost 9 inches tall and 6 inches across. I bought one as it is a little cheaper per ounce to buy the Nido in the larger amount. The large can holds about 4 pounds of the dry milk mix.



The small Nido can weighs:
with lid - 83.2 grams - 2.93 ounces.
without lid - 77.2 grams - 2.72 ounces.



The large Nido can weighs:
with lid - 277.9 grams - 9.80 ounces.
without lid - 264.0 grams - 9.31 ounces.




I am now thinking about what kind of backpacking gear I can turn this big can into.

- My first though is a larger wood stove on legs (titanium tent stakes) that might also provide a bit of heat.

- Next might be a typical can style wood stove for a small group.

- Another thought is a food container to keep small rodents out of my food. It will never be a bear canister but might be mice proof.

There must be many other things this large can could be turned into - what are your thoughts?

The thread:


Large Nido Can

Ike Mouser
(isaac.mouser) - F
hey on 04/08/2010 13:51:51 MDT Print View

walmart large nido, problem solved.

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: Where to buy powdered milk in bulk? on 04/08/2010 13:55:08 MDT Print View

I buy it at natural food stores. I prefer http://www.organicvalley.coop/products/milk-powders/

JOHN ZENNER
(johnz)

Locale: East Bay
Mexican markets on 04/08/2010 18:37:34 MDT Print View

I live across the bay in Alameda, went over into Oakland and stopped at the first Mexican market I saw on International... bingo, Nido in all sizes! If you are in SF, head into the Mission, should be really easy to find a Mexican market there.

Jason G
(JasonG) - F

Locale: iceberg lake
awesome on 04/22/2010 21:05:22 MDT Print View

thx everybody. Can anyone recommend a good natural foods store somewhere between San fran and san jose? I guess Ill have to settle for walmart if not.

Ike Mouser
(isaac.mouser) - F
windscreen on 04/23/2010 07:44:30 MDT Print View

turn it into a windscreen bill.

Scott Bentz
(scottbentz) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Nutrition Facts on 04/23/2010 15:18:37 MDT Print View

Can anyone tell me what the calories to weight are for NIDO? There is absolutely no information on the website. I use Carnation Instant Breakfast mixed with powdered milk and figure NIDO must be much more dense. Since I am hiking I don't worry about the fat calories as I am usually on a deficit anyway.

If someone could check, that would be great.

Scott

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Nido calories on 04/23/2010 18:09:54 MDT Print View

"If someone could check, that would be great."

Nido contains 152 calories/30 gram serving.

8 grams of fat = 72 calories
12 grams of carbohydrate(no fiber) = 48 calories
8 grams of protein = 32 calories.

Scott Bentz
(scottbentz) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Nido Calories on 04/26/2010 15:55:25 MDT Print View

Thanks Tom.

I have been using non-fat dry milk for a long time. I mix that with either dried granola or Carnation Instant Breakfast. Nido has a better calorie to weight ratio. I may try this on my next long hike.

Jason G
(JasonG) - F

Locale: iceberg lake
woot! on 05/01/2010 03:08:20 MDT Print View

Just found a local spot that sells Nido! Costco had a big box of it but it was non-fat.. i also discovered a bunch of Mexican drink powder mixes to bring on the trail too! mmm nothing like a nice cold horchata after a nice long walk. pretty nutritious too!

Dont Wantto
(longhiker) - F
saturated fat content in whole milk on 06/29/2010 20:07:41 MDT Print View

I'm not sure if I should get powdered whole milk or non-fat milk for a month-long thru-hike. Yes, I'll consume a LOT of calories (3000 / day) but I was hoping to use about 2 oz of powdered milk a day.

2 oz of powdered milk has about 50% of your daily value saturated fat. Even if you assume your saturated fat requirement is doubled by the 16 miles/day hiking, the milk alone gives you 25% of saturated fat..

And of course, I'll be eating a TON (10 oz to be exact) of nuts and beef and snickers bars and what not to get to the 3000 calories.

So it seemed like I don't need so much saturated fat from my milk.. but I might be totally misreading this. Any advice?

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: saturated fat content in whole milk @dontwantto on 06/29/2010 20:36:03 MDT Print View

"So it seemed like I don't need so much saturated fat from my milk.. but I might be totally misreading this. Any advice?"

On the hike you're doing, you don't have to worry about saturated fat clogging up your arteries. You'll burn every last calorie and then some. Those saturated fat recommendations are for people going about a typical semi sedentary lifestyle day in and day out. What you do need to worry about is getting as many calories as you can in your diet, consistent with supplying adequate protein for tissue repair and carbohydrates to supply quickly available energy when needed plus feed "the flame that burns fat". Powdered non fat milk supplies about half the calories of Nido, a real disadvantage, IMO, on a long distance hike. For a very good write up on this subject, check out the Arctic1000 website for their write up on food. Even better, PM Kevin Sawchuck. He supplied an excellent explanation of food requirements for endurance hiking in a thread about his hike/race through the Bob Marshall Wilderness last fall, but I can't remember the thread title offhand. If you PM him I'll bet he'd point you to it. It's an excellent read.

Edited by ouzel on 06/29/2010 20:39:19 MDT.

Dont Wantto
(longhiker) - F
helpful reply on 06/30/2010 09:09:27 MDT Print View

your reply has been plenty helpful already! I'll order the whole fat powder for now and look at the sources you mention when I have a little more time.

thanks again for your info!

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: helpful reply on 06/30/2010 18:17:12 MDT Print View

"thanks again for your info!"

My pleasure. I hope you have a great trip. Maybe a trip report when you return? :)

Dont Wantto
(longhiker) - F
will blame it all on BPL on 07/01/2010 12:02:31 MDT Print View

a trip report will happen..

my backpacking has completely changed (well, at least in theory) after finding BPL and that's the reason I'm even thinking about a trip this long.

I've been on a few weekend trips since going light and it's been amazing. But there have been a few bummers where I realized I cut weight too much at the expense of comfort I really wanted.

So I'm going to come back from the CT and blame it all on BPL.. whether it be a lightning strike or too much mileage from having such a light pack, leading to injury :)

James D Buch
(rocketman) - F

Locale: Midwest
Fats and Health on 07/03/2010 05:47:55 MDT Print View

"Evidence based Medicine" comes in conflict with old "Expert Based Opinion" on "artery clogging dietary fats". In the 1950's the "experts"knew about "artery clogging fats" being the cause of heart attacks.

The first "Evidence based study" on Saturated Fats was published in 2001 ...
http://mrw.interscience.wiley.com/cochrane/clsysrev/articles/CD002137/frame.html

This study is briefly described below. Note NO SIGNIFICANT EFFECT ON TOTAL MORTALITY, TREND towards protection, and a NON-SIGNIFICANT protection trend.

EXTRACT
"There was no significant effect on total mortality (rate ratio 0.98, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.12), a trend towards protection form cardiovascular mortality (rate ratio 0.91, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.07), and significant protection from cardiovascular events (rate ratio 0.84, 95% CI 0.72 to 0.99). The latter became non-significant on sensitivity analysis."

---------------------------------------------------------



Abstract

Objectives
The aim of this systematic review was to assess the effect of reduction or modification of dietary fats on total and cardiovascular mortality and cardiovascular morbidity over at least 6 months, using all available randomized clinical trials.

Search strategy
The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CAB Abstracts, CVRCT registry and related Cochrane Groups' trial registers were searched through spring 1998, SIGLE to January 1999. Trials known to experts in the field and biographies were included through May 1999.

Selection criteria
Trials fulfilled the following criteria: 1) randomized with appropriate control group, 2) intention to reduce or modify fat or cholesterol intake (excluding exclusively omega-3 fat interventions), 3) not multi factorial, 4) healthy adult humans, 5) intervention at least six months, 6) mortality or cardiovascular morbidity data available. Inclusion decisions were duplicated, disagreement resolved by discussion or a third party.

Data collection and analysis
Rate data were extracted by two independent reviewers and meta-analysis performed using random effects methodology. Meta-regression and funnel plots were used.

Main results
Twenty seven studies were included (40 intervention arms, 30,901 person-years). There was no significant effect on total mortality (rate ratio 0.98, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.12), a trend towards protection form cardiovascular mortality (rate ratio 0.91, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.07), and significant protection from cardiovascular events (rate ratio 0.84, 95% CI 0.72 to 0.99). The latter became non-significant on sensitivity analysis.

Trials where participants were involved for more than 2 years showed significant reductions in the rate of cardiovascular events and a suggestion of protection from total mortality. The degree of protection from cardiovascular events appeared similar in high and low risk groups, but was statistically significant only in the former.

Authors' conclusions
The findings are suggestive of a small but potentially important reduction in cardiovascular risk in trials longer than two years. Lifestyle advice to all those at high risk of cardiovascular disease (especially where statins are unavailable or rationed), and to lower risk population groups, should continue to include permanent reduction of dietary saturated fat and partial replacement by unsaturates.

-----------------------------------------

The Smoking Gun of "artery clogging fats" from the 1950's still rides around shooting blanks. But they are "expert blanks".

Subsequent "Evidence Based" studies generally end up in approximately the same conclusion range.