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David McBride
(VintageGent) - F

Locale: Galveston TX
New to Forums: Gear List on 04/03/2010 13:47:12 MDT Print View

I've been backpacking for about seven years now, and having gotten into it in my middle years, I started out with an emphasis on relatively lightweight equipment. This is my gear as it currently stands, for a 2-3 night trip where I might expect to encounter some wet and/or blustery weather. If I'm on an overnight where the conditions are projected to be clear, I can shave off around a pound and a half.

Most of my backpacking is either in the south during the fall, winter and early spring, or elsewhere during the summer. I never encounter temperatures more than a few degrees below freezing.

(All weights are in ounces.)

Tarptent Squall: 30.8
Golite Gust: 21.2
Silnylon pack cover: 3.1
Mountainsmith Wisp bag (32F): 22.4
Thermarest Prolite 4: 13.4
Sit pad (closed cell foam square): 2.0

Katadyn Hiker Pro Filter: 13.5
Water bottles: 2.0
Walmart Grease Pot: 4.3
MSR pot holder: 1.1
MSR Pocket Rocket: 3.0
Fuel: 4.0
Ursack: 5.5
Ti spork: 0.6
Knife (Gerber): 1.4
Pack Towel: 1.6

Ditty bag*: 3.0
1st aid: 1.6
Soap: 1.4
Toilet paper: 0.6
Toothbrush and paste: 1.2

Montbell Down Jacket: 8.0
Under Armour SS shirt: 4.6
SmartWool socks: 2.8
Fleece gloves: 2.9
Fleece pants: 7.0
Extra underwear: 2.0
Wool cap: 2.4
Montane wind shirt: 3.1
Frog Toggs: 17
Bandana: 0.9
Stuff sack for clothes: 0.8

Total: 189.2 = 11lb, 13.2oz

* contains headlamp, sewing kit, coffee filters as prefilters for water, tweezers, compass

Thoughts? Places where I might be able to pare things down? Keep in mind that I've tried a Ridge Rest and a closed cell foam pad, but they just don't provide enough padding for middle aged bones.

Robert Cowman
(rcowman) - F

Locale: Canadian Rockies
recommendations on 04/03/2010 14:40:06 MDT Print View

Ditch the filter at 13.5oz for aquamira or pristine. you can lose the extra underwear at 2oz. that's a pound cut out. If the investment is possible you can go to a down sleeping bag like a WM summerlight or mightylite and drop a few more oz. You can lose the pack cover and go to a garbage bag for a liner and lose another oz or so and you can drop the sit pad and use your thermarest to sleep on.

Edited by rcowman on 04/03/2010 14:42:08 MDT.

Andy F
(AndyF) - M
Re: New to Forums: Gear List on 04/03/2010 17:05:12 MDT Print View

add a pealess whistle
list your firestarting device

David McBride
(VintageGent) - F

Locale: Galveston TX
Re: Re: New to Forums: Gear List on 04/03/2010 17:26:16 MDT Print View

Whistle is around my neck on a lanyard. Forgot to mention that lighter is in the ditty bag.

Mike Clelland
(mikeclelland) - MLife

Locale: The Tetons (via Idaho)
subtracted over 3 & 1/2 pounds! on 04/03/2010 19:01:26 MDT Print View

David,

I went thru and played editor. I managed to subtract over 3 & 1/2 pounds of stuff!
______________________________________________________


Tarptent Squall: 30.8 --- EXCHANGE --- Get a tarp and save approx. 20.8 oz

Golite Gust: 21.2 --- REVISE --- Oh I just KNOW you could get the scissors out and trim off a goodly percentage of that monstrosity! I would say you could NIX 8 oz, no probz - Subtract approx. 8 oz.

Silnylon pack cover: 3.1 --- NIX --- No need, they won't fully waterproof your pack (imagine it falling in a river) but, a simple Hefty TRACH COMPACTOR bag is a perfect pack LINER. Saving 1.1 oz.

Thermarest Prolite 4: 13.4 --- you will spend 1/3 of your time on this pad, so this is up to you. But, you could exchange it for a TORSO length pad, saving 4.4 oz.

Sit pad (closed cell foam square): 2.0 --- NIX --- No need. Sitting on the ground is a very human skill.

Katadyn Hiker Pro Filter: 13.5 --- EXCHANGE --- Use repackaged aqua mira drops. Saving approx. 12.5 oz

Water bottles: 2.0 --- QUESTION --- What are your bottles? How much volume? (2 oz is awesome!)

Walmart Grease Pot: 4.3 --- Are you solo camping? If so, this is sorta big for a personal POT and EATING bowl, saving 1 oz or so...

MSR pot holder: 1.1 --- QUESTION --- What is this???

Knife (Gerber): 1.4 --- EXCHANGE --- Use a single edge razor blade, in a homemade cardboard holder. Saving 1.3 oz!

Pack Towel: 1.6 --- NIX --- You already have a bandana. No need for a redundant tool.

Soap: 1.4 --- EXCHANGE --- that is actually a lot of soap. It might be the bottle, repackage into a smaller vessel. saving approx. half the weight at 0.7 oz.

Toilet paper: 0.6 --- NIX --- It is very easy to go without.

Extra underwear: 2.0 --- NIX --- You will be fine.

Stuff sack for clothes: 0.8 --- NIX --- No need.

( = )

Total saved is 56. 8 oz (that's over 3 1/2 pounds subtracted!)



Ditty bag*: 3.0 --- * contains headlamp, sewing kit, coffee filters as pre-filters for water, tweezers, compass
PLEASE --- give the weights of each of these items too.



Questions:
========
a) Cup for drinking?
b) are you solo camping?
c) Where are you camping?
d) for how long?
e) how do you light the stove?
f) sleeping socks?

Chris Gray
(ChrisFol) - F

Locale: Denver, Coloado
RE: New to Forums: Gear List on 04/03/2010 19:07:19 MDT Print View

-Nix the rain-cover. Use a pack liner, like a trash compactor bag and save around 1.5oz. You could then also nix all off your stuff sacks and save a few more ounces.

-There are also lighter pads if you care for short pads. For example the TorsoLite and Montbell UL pad is around 10oz.

-Nix pot holder and pack towel and use your bandana for both uses.

-You could look into an alcohol stove instead of the PR and save 2.5oz

- You could perhaps nix the filter also and just use aqua-mira or MicroPur tablets. If you need a filter then look at the Frontier Pro for 2oz.

These are just considerations.

Nate Meinzer
(Rezniem) - F

Locale: San Francisco
NIX on 04/03/2010 19:56:46 MDT Print View

Fleece pants are overkill. If you wear pants, then a very light pair of long underwear (silk) and hiking pants and the frogg toggs rain pants will be plenty warm. If you want a slightly heavier version, (and more expensive), get some lightweight wool ones. Or even some REI MTS lightweight poly ones. All are lighter than fleece, which is overkill for the conditions you describe.

That water filter is like a rock in your pack! Get some droplets or if you're fussy, a UV adventurer (I love(d) mine.

But if you don't NIX that water filters, someone should NIX YOU!

David McBride
(VintageGent) - F

Locale: Galveston TX
Re: subtracted over 3 & 1/2 pounds! on 04/03/2010 21:51:21 MDT Print View

Some good thoughts here. Got out the scissors and the needle and thread and pared a full ounce off of the Gust. And using a plastic bag as a pack liner sounds like a solid idea as well.

Some of the items, however, serve a dual purpose. The stuff sack for clothes also serves as a pillow case. The sit pad, which protects my butt from the ubiquitous Texas sticker burrs, is also a nice resting place for my feet during sleep; my pad is only torso length.

Too many bugs in many of the places I hike to jettison the Tarptent for a tarp. Plus, I just like the feeling of having "four walls" around me when I sleep, flimsy though they may be.

And I miscalculated on the water bottles. They're 2 oz. each. So 4 oz. total.

Here's how the ditty bag breaks down:
Bag: 0.6
Lamp (Black Diamond Ion): 1.1
Sewing kit: 0.1
Rubber bands: 0.1
Safety pins: 0.1
Tweezers: 0 (didn't even register on the scale)
Lighter: 0.4
Compass: 0.1
Coffee filters: 0.1
Total: 2.6 (I had an extra pack of tissue when I originally weighed it, so it's 0.4 oz. less)

Answers to a your questions:

a) Cup for drinking?
Don't use one. Only drink water on the trail.

b) are you solo camping?
About half the time. The other half, I'm with my daughter.

c) Where are you camping?
Various places: East Texas Piney Woods, Central Texas Hill Country, some West Texas mountains. We'll be doing a stint in the Colorado Sangre de Cristo Mountains this summer. Through hiked the Hadrian's Wall Path in Northern England last year.

d) for how long?
Anywhere from an overnight to six nights. Most common is 1-3 nights. On an overnight, I wouldn't bring an extra pair of underwear, nor would I usually an extra pair of socks.

e) how do you light the stove?
Small lighter.

f) sleeping socks?
Extra pair of Smart Wool (on my list)

Edited by VintageGent on 04/03/2010 21:54:43 MDT.

Thomas Burns
(nerdboy52) - MLife

Locale: "Alas, poor Yogi.I knew him well."
Off topic, sorry on 04/03/2010 22:34:30 MDT Print View

>Through hiked the Hadrian's Wall Path in Northern England last year.

Could you please email or PM me about this hike? Sounds like a great one.

Stargazer
tlburns@owu.edu

Chris Gray
(ChrisFol) - F

Locale: Denver, Coloado
Re: Re: subtracted over 3 & 1/2 pounds! on 04/04/2010 10:02:53 MDT Print View

"Too many bugs in many of the places I hike to jettison the Tarptent for a tarp. Plus, I just like the feeling of having "four walls" around me when I sleep, flimsy though they may be"

Just some food for thought:

You can purchase additional bug nets for most tarps. For example Gossamer Gear's Spinn Twinn Tarp + the bug canopy weighs less than 15oz-- that would cut your shelter weight in half and still keep the bugs away. Plus you already carry the poles (from your picture).

As long as your are comfortable however, it doesn't really matter.
------------------
"And I miscalculated on the water bottles. They're 2 oz. each. So 4 oz. total."

Not sure what bottles these are but there are lighter options available such as Aquafina, Gatorade and Smart water bottles which weigh less than 2oz and costs much less than traditional water bottles. 1L Platypus soft bottles weigh less than ounce I believe.
------------------

"Extra pair of Smart Wool (on my list)"-- Listed weight is 2.6oz. Have you tried generic dress socks or ankle socks, they weigh in at around 1oz, and if they are just used for sleeping then they should be adequate enough depending on what type of sleeper you are.

-----------------------------------

"Some of the items, however, serve a dual purpose. The stuff sack for clothes also serves as a pillow case."

I am assuming that you have multiple stuff sacks one for your: bag, pad, clothes. You could nix two of those with a pack liner and at night simply put your clothes in the empty one to use as a pillow.

Edited by ChrisFol on 04/04/2010 10:31:59 MDT.

David McBride
(VintageGent) - F

Locale: Galveston TX
Revised list on 04/17/2010 14:48:27 MDT Print View

Some excellent suggestions so far.

I've put together a revised list, an interim effort, which is a little more than a pound-and-a-half lighter.

Tarptent Squall: 30.8
Golite Gust: 20.2
Pack liner: 0.8
Mountainsmith Wisp bag (32F): 22.4
Thermarest Prolite (torso length): 13.4

Katadyn Hiker Pro Filter: 13.3
Water bottles (3 20oz. Dasani): 2.4
Walmart Grease Pot: 4.3
MSR pot holder: 1.1
MSR Pocket Rocket: 3.0
Fuel: 4.0
Ursack: 5.5
Ti spork: 0.6
Knife (Gerber): 1.4
Pack Towel: 1.6

Ditty bag: 0.6
Lamp (Black Diamond Ion): 1.1
Sewing kit: 0.1
Rubber bands: 0.1
Safety pins: 0.1
Tweezers: 0 (didn't even register on the scale)
Lighter: 0.4
Compass: 0.1
Coffee filters: 0.1
1st aid: 1.6
Soap: 1.4
Toilet paper: 0.6
Toothbrush and paste: 1.0

Montbell down jacket: 8.0
Under Armour SS shirt: 4.6
SmartWool socks: 2.8
Fleece gloves: 2.9
Silk long bottoms: 3.8
Wool cap: 2.4
Dri Ducks rain jacket: 7.5
Stuff sack for clothes: 0.8

Total: 164.8 oz. = 10 lb, 4.8 oz

A few notes:

(1) For now, I'm keeping the Tarp Tent set up and the filter, although I appreciate the alternate suggestions.

(2) I haven't gotten a lighter container for my soap yet, which should shave off at least half an ounce. Nor have I had a chance to pick up ankle length Smart Wool socks, which should also save a bit of weight.

(3) I'm probably going to pick up one of the lighter PackTowls. I'm also thinking about getting a Monatauk Gnat stove (1.6 oz.), saving an additional 1.4 oz.

(4) Instead of a rain suit and a wind shirt, I switched to just a rain jacket, which can double as a wind shirt. If I'm doing just a one- or two-night trip where I expect no rain, I'll trade the rain jacket for a wind shirt (3.1 oz.).

(5) I'm afraid I'm not giving up the toilet paper. I hike plenty of places where there are either no leaves or what leaves there are have fallen to the ground and are dry and brittle.

Edited by VintageGent on 04/17/2010 14:52:39 MDT.

Mike Clelland
(mikeclelland) - MLife

Locale: The Tetons (via Idaho)
gear. on 04/18/2010 09:20:15 MDT Print View

Just a little bit more input. Beyond this, the list looks great.
=====================

Tarptent Squall: 30.8 - Still gunna advocate for a tarp. (This will save you 20 oz.)

Golite Gust: 20.2 - There are a LOT of lighter backpacks on the market. And, with minimal gear, this pack is excessively roomy. At least take the razor blade to it and cut off approx. 8 oz of extraneous stuff (saving 8 oz)

Katadyn Hiker Pro Filter: 13.3 - I am still going to advocate for leaving this behind and use AQUAMIRA. (Saving approx. 11.3 oz.)

MSR Pocket Rocket: 3.0
Fuel: 4.0

A simple "cat food" (approx. 0.5 oz) stove and alcohol is lighter, and the fuel is a LOT less expensive. (saving 3 oz)

Ursack: 5.5 - Where are you hiking that requires the BEAR bag? Is it really only 5.5 oz? If you leave it behind you could replace it with string (saving 3 oz)

Knife (Gerber): 1.4 - A single edge razor is 0.1 oz

Pack Towel: 1.6 - Question: Why do you need this? I've never ever carried one, and I do fine without it. Are you taking this instead of a bandana?

Soap: 1.4 - BPL sells a selection of VERY tiny dropper bottles.

Toilet paper: 0.6 - Easily nixed (rocks are plentiful everywhere)
LINK
http://www.backpackinglight.com/cgi-bin/backpackinglight/toilet_paper_free.html

Stuff sack for clothes: 0.8 - Easily NIXED.

Totaling the above comes to approx. 50 ounces (over 3 pounds!)

Bradford Rogers
(Mocs123) - MLife

Locale: Southeast Tennessee
Re: New to Forums: Gear List on 04/19/2010 09:29:13 MDT Print View

There are some good suggestions already here, but it looks like a pretty good list already. The one obvious thing that does not fit is the Filter. I changed from a Pur Hiker to repackaged Aquamira a couple of years ago and would never go back.

I am assuming that you have the Ursack because you hike where there are no trees to hang a bear bag?

If you still want a real knife you could still go lighter with a 0.6oz Gerber LST, Spyderco Ladybug, or Swiss Army mini.

Your fleece gloves seem heavy to me. I have several pairs and they are all less than 2oz.

I would ditch the pack towel if you are already taking a bandana.

David McBride
(VintageGent) - F

Locale: Galveston TX
Re: gear. on 04/20/2010 16:17:37 MDT Print View

Mike, I appreciate your insights.

I know the Gust is roomier and heavier by a few ounces than what I really need (although I was able to take a scissors to it and eradicate an ounce), but I bought it at a time when my kids were young, and I found myself carrying some of their gear. Now that they've gotten to the point where they can carry all of their stuff--and even a few shared items--I can probably graduate to something lighter and less voluminous. I've had my eye on one of the zpacks (even the heaviest option I've looked at weighs only slightly more than 11 oz), but alas they're not taking new orders at the moment.

As for the filter, I find myself in places where water sources are a bit sketchy, and a filter helps some with the taste. You are right that I could ditch the filter for aquamira drops in places where the water runs pretty clear.

I use the Ursack less as a bear bag, although I do hike from time to time in locations where the ursine mammal is about. It's more a defense against miscellaneous varieties of critter, and it has come in handy. And no, it's not 5.5 oz.; it's 6.3. I must not have gotten it on the scale properly the first time.

I've got one of the nifty single edge blades from BPL on order (0.3 oz) as well as a couple of dropper bottles for soap.

And, finally, on the issue of the tarp, I'm not quite there yet. It's hard to get over the psychological hurdle of giving up four walls and a floor, but I'll certainly keep this in mind.

Bradford, the fleece gloves were in the bargain bin on end-of-season clearout at the local grocery store (strange, but true) for $1.00. I figure I can give up the ounce for the $ savings.

Edited by VintageGent on 04/20/2010 16:19:22 MDT.

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Re: gear. on 04/21/2010 01:31:03 MDT Print View

And, finally, on the issue of the tarp, I'm not quite there yet. It's hard to get over the psychological hurdle of giving up four walls and a floor, but I'll certainly keep this in mind.


David,

I am a big tarp or poncho/tarp fan. But your reason is sound. Plus it does take a little practice to get there. Work on getting your weight down little by little. Sometimes dealing with a lot of new gear/techniques all at once can become overwhelming.

Enjoy the hike.

Chris Gray
(ChrisFol) - F

Locale: Denver, Coloado
Re: Re: Re: gear. on 04/21/2010 01:37:49 MDT Print View

I am tarp+bivy guy-- I still find it difficult to sleep in bug season without the bivy or at least a bug net.

The four-wall syndrome was minimal because a bivy provides just the same but with a lower weight at the cost of space.

In short-- a bivy is a nice transition into the world of tarp camping. Now I leave the bivy at home in shoulder seasons.

Larry Dyer
(veriest1) - F

Locale: Texas
Tarps on 04/21/2010 23:57:24 MDT Print View

Man... haven't posted in a while but I'm from Texas as well and definitely understand the bugs. A bug net is pretty high on my list of things to buy for this year to use with my tarp.

I was in the same boat (tent?) as you and wasn't sure about the whole tarp camping thing for many of the same reasons. Try this to see if you like it, head down to your local Wal-Mart, Tractor Supply, or what-have-you and buy a cheap blue tarp. Then take it on an overnight trip somewhere nearby, maybe even your backyard, and see how you like it (preferably on a night with a full moon for the greatest effect). If you truly like it you can then upgrade from there as you see fit.

For me, it was a stunning revelation and I constantly find myself wiggling my head out a bit to look at the stars when it isn't raining. Plus being able to see out without fumbling with a zipper was amazing on multiple levels. Your mileage may, of course, vary but that's how it was for me. Good luck out there.

Dan Durston
(dandydan)

Locale: Cascadia
Re: Revised list on 04/22/2010 01:09:35 MDT Print View

Some ideas:

1) Hike in a really light (ie. 2oz) baselayer like a GoLite DriMove Lite tee. These dry so quickly that you can just wash them in a stream when they start to stink and then wring it out, put it back on and it'll be dry in 20 minutes. This eliminates needing to carry a second Under Armour SS shirt, saving a couple ounces off your skin and 4.6oz from your pack.

2) If you want to spend money, the North Face Triumph Anorak is 2oz lighter than your DriDucks and more durable too.

3) Gloves and socks could both be lighter. I've got Ice Breaker 320g/m2 Merino Wool gloves which are pretty durable and thick for 1.8oz. Get yourself low socks that weigh about 1/2 what your presumably full height SmartWool socks do. Total weight savings = 2oz.

4) Ditch the coffee filters (0.1oz) and your heavy bag of coffee grinds and switch to Starbucks Via instant coffee. It's good, quick and super light at 0.1oz/cup.

5) If you've got money to spend, you can save an ounce or so by replacing the Pocket Rocket (3oz) with Snow Peaks lightest stove (1.9) or that new Knat stove (1.7oz).

6) Aquamira pills are the best water treatment IMO. It's just so fast, easy and it kills everything. Consider leaving the 13oz filter at home.

7) If you're spending money, consider the nice 30F Palisade quilt from Katabatic Gear. It looks beautiful and weighs 17oz, saving you 5oz:
http://katabaticgear.com/shop/palisade-sleeping-bag/

8) You could save some weight by replacing your Squall with something lighter like the SMD Lunar Solo (23oz) or even the Zpacks Hexamid (9oz) and still have 4 walls or close to it. The SMD Gatewood Cape (11oz) combined with the inner Serenity net tent (7oz) is also a neat way to get essentially a single person double wall tent and your rain jacket all in one. You could replace your DriDucks and Squall with this setup and save about 18oz with no significantly loss in functionality it seems.

Edited by dandydan on 04/22/2010 01:10:56 MDT.

David McBride
(VintageGent) - F

Locale: Galveston TX
Re: Re: Revised list on 04/24/2010 18:05:02 MDT Print View

Dan, a few questions (and clarifications)

I usually hike in an Ibex LS merino tee. Most of my hiking is done in cooler weather, although I bring the Under Armour as backup in case things get too warm, and as another layer in case it gets too cold.

The coffee filters aren't for coffee. I wrap them around the Hiker Pro's prefilter in case the water source is too sketchy.

Wouldn't the quilt require a hood? From what I read on the Katabatic Gear website, it would, particularly because I use the bag in temperatures down to freezing. So that would be an extra 1.4 oz. And would the quilt work with a torso pad?

Chris Gray
(ChrisFol) - F

Locale: Denver, Coloado
Re: Re: Re: Revised list on 04/24/2010 18:50:23 MDT Print View

"Wouldn't the quilt require a hood?"

Down to +32, a fleece hat should be just fine, but as always YMMV.