Arctic tent
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Robert Blean
(blean) - MLife

Locale: San Jose -- too far from Sierras
Arctic tent on 04/01/2010 18:33:10 MDT Print View

Which tent would be the lightest acceptable for a canoe trip in northern Canada -- north of the tree line? The issues I see are:

* bugs

* high winds that can last for days

* for various reasons will get pitched on places like a gravel bar or even exposed granite.

I cannot see waiting out a multiple-day storm in a bivy sack. I've never been there, but from the pictures of trips that do go there it looks like the tent would probably need to be free-standing.

The traditional solution is a multiple-pounds expedition-rated free-standing dome tent. I'd like to see how much that weight can be (safely) cut.

--MV

. .
(biointegra) - MLife

Locale: Puget Sound
Re: Arctic tent on 04/01/2010 18:38:15 MDT Print View

It's not freestanding, but I would consider a Hilleberg Kaitum. The huge dual vestibules make it a very livable tent. See the review here on BPL.

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: Arctic tent on 04/01/2010 18:40:01 MDT Print View

"High winds that can last for days."

Never camped in the Arctic, but just that alone will eliminate UL tarptents for me -- not just for structural reasons (some of Henry's newer designs can withstand pretty good blows) -- but also to minimize constant draft blowing across my face all through the night.

Maybe a Hilleberg Soulo?

Matt Lutz
(citystuckhiker) - F

Locale: Midwest
Re: Re: Arctic tent on 04/01/2010 19:17:13 MDT Print View

+1 for Hilleberg. I spent two months in the summer of 2005 in a Hilleberg Saivo canoeing from Hudson Bay. Absolutely bombproof and the best tent I have ever been in.

www.hudsonbayexpedition.com

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Arctic tent on 04/01/2010 19:21:44 MDT Print View

When the 1983 American expedition on Mount Everest was preparing to go up the west ridge, they knew that high wind would be a problem, so they had custom tents designed to withstand 140 mph wind. When they got up on the west ridge, 15 out of 18 of those tents were destroyed by wind.

Kind of scary, isn't it? It was even very windy down at base camp on the Nepal side.

--B.G.--

Richard Lyon
(richardglyon) - MLife

Locale: Bridger Mountains
Another vote for Hilleberg on 04/01/2010 20:47:57 MDT Print View

I bought my Unna from Peter Vacco, veteran Arctic trekker (and occasional BGT contributor). It not only looks like new (almost), it's taken several more years of hard Rockies weather. Great tent, and it's made me an enthusiastic Hilleberg supporter.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Arctic tent on 04/01/2010 21:15:34 MDT Print View

"The traditional solution is a multiple-pounds expedition-rated free-standing dome tent. I'd like to see how much that weight can be (safely) cut."

The Integral Designs Mark 1, or Mark 1 XL if you are tall, are both very wind resistant free standing tents. They were originally designed for high altitude mountaineering.

The Mark 1 weighs ~ 3# 12 oz and the XL is somewhere around 4# 10 oz. I used a Mark 1 for years. Great tent. Only downside is no vestibule.

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
SAFETY FIRST on 04/01/2010 22:06:47 MDT Print View

For SAFETY I'd get a Hilleberg tent, either dome or tunnel W/ 2 vestibules.

Joseph Reeves
(Umnak)

Locale: Southeast Alaska
Think about a pyramid on 04/01/2010 22:32:46 MDT Print View

We've used pyramid tents in the high Canadian arctic, Baffin and Greenland. The design has also been used on polar trips. I think you would be fine with some tie outs on the side for extra stability and a bug bivy or hanging net for the no-see-ums. Rocks for securing the pyramid will be in great supply, and you can use your canoe paddles joined together with velcro as the center pole. I don't think really need a stand alone tent. Our Oware 9x9 weighs 26 ounces. Take a look at the Arctic 1000 trip report somewhere on BPL and www.groundtruthtrekking.org for what a pyramid can withstand.

This in more docile climes here in Southeast Alaska.

Pyramid Tarp Camp

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: Re: Arctic tent on 04/01/2010 22:40:51 MDT Print View

Bob Gross wrote: "When the 1983 American expedition on Mount Everest was preparing to go up the west ridge, they knew that high wind would be a problem, so they had custom tents designed to withstand 140 mph wind. When they got up on the west ridge, 15 out of 18 of those tents were destroyed by wind."

I watched a documentary on climbing Everest and I will never forget a scene that showed a fixed camera view of a tent in the wind high on the mountain. It brought home the unrelenting force of the wind and filled me with fear for the poor devils waiting out the storm inside the tent. Any thought of sleeping with that going on would be futile. How the tent withstood it all is amazing.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Re: Re: Arctic tent on 04/01/2010 22:56:12 MDT Print View

Bring back the Whillans Box Tent.

Not exactly ultralight.

--B.G.--

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Arctic tent on 04/01/2010 23:58:52 MDT Print View

May I offer:
OP Pyramid
Australian-made Antarctic expedition tent currently in use.
Guy ropes are (I believe) 6 mm. Corner poles are (I believe) 60 mm.

Cheers

Edited by rcaffin on 04/01/2010 23:59:25 MDT.

Matt Lutz
(citystuckhiker) - F

Locale: Midwest
Re: Re: Arctic tent on 04/02/2010 06:15:39 MDT Print View

+1 to Roger. I was waiting for that photo to come up (again).

Rog Tallbloke
(tallbloke) - F

Locale: DON'T LOOK DOWN!!
Re: Re: Re: Arctic tent on 04/02/2010 07:15:39 MDT Print View

"Corner poles are (I believe) 60 mm."

Sounds like scaffolding tube. :-)

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Arctic tent on 04/02/2010 08:45:15 MDT Print View

That ain't silnylon!

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: Arctic tent on 04/02/2010 08:51:59 MDT Print View

Thread drift -

David, is your avatar Papago?

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Arctic tent on 04/02/2010 09:32:25 MDT Print View

Greg - no, it's actually a tidal cliff off the coast of Vancouver Island. Things got very interesting after I got down.

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: Arctic tent on 04/02/2010 09:39:55 MDT Print View

Thanks David. Just wondering. Glad you survived.

Drift Over.

Ike Mouser
(isaac.mouser) - F
hilleberg on 04/02/2010 11:39:26 MDT Print View

hilleberg ftw

Buck Nelson
(Colter) - MLife

Locale: Alaska
Where and how you set up is as important as what you set up. on 04/02/2010 18:37:51 MDT Print View

I used a Tarptent Squall on my Alaska Traverse, and it worked fine. I tend to avoid exposed gravel bars when possible. In windy country the wind can slam some lightweight shelters too hard if set up on open gravel bars. Usually I was setting up in spots with good drainage and protected by willows. A thick stand of willows or a cutbank upwind makes a huge difference with wind. If I had to leave soon on such a trip, I'd probably bring my Lunar Solo. If you must set up in exposed places, you'll probably want a beefier shelter. You'll definitely want a screened shelter in either case.