Forum Index » General Lightweight Backpacking Discussion » Recommended snake proof gaiters?


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McDowell Crook
(mcdcrook) - M

Locale: Southeast
Recommended snake proof gaiters? on 03/29/2010 13:53:00 MDT Print View

I live in Alabama, and last year I was almost bitten twice by timber rattlers. Can anyone recommend some good lightweight gaiters?

thanks,
mcd
http://bit.ly/9YWFTy

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Recommended snake proof gaiters? on 03/29/2010 14:00:08 MDT Print View

I would think that you would want some standard almost-knee-high Outdoor Research gaiters like X-C skiers use. Nobody will certify them as being snake-proof. However, with the speed that a snake strikes and the durability of the heavy fabric, fangs should not be able to penetrate much. Besides, you may have socks and trouser cuffs underneath the heavy fabric. If you were really paranoid, you could slip a piece of Kevlar in there.

Don't worry about it. They don't eat much.
--B.G.--

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: Recommended snake proof gaiters? on 03/29/2010 14:03:47 MDT Print View

This is really off the wall, as I know Nothing about what might be out there ---

--- but if nothing shows up, perhaps the folks who make the Ursack Minor food bag (out of lightweight kevlar) could make a simple step-in tube with a couple of grommets on the bottom for an instep strap, and a shockcord snugger at the top.

One Ursack Minor costs $50, so these wouldn't be cheap.

And Cabella's.

McDowell Crook
(mcdcrook) - M

Locale: Southeast
re: gaiters on 03/29/2010 14:10:46 MDT Print View

Normally I don't sweat the snakes, but for some reason I have seen a lot more than usual lately. I do some solo hiking and have become concerned enough to wear some heavy kevlar gaiters. The Cabela's TurtleSkin Snake Armor Gaiters seem about the lightest out there: http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/links/link.jsp;jsessionid=KQYUHOTWMLRPZLAQBBJSCO3MCAEFIIWE?id=0033130942629a&type=product&cmCat=thefind&cm_ven=data_feed&cm_cat=thefind&cm_pla=0510216&cm_ite=0033130942629a&_requestid=72933&_requestid=77979

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: re: gaiters on 03/29/2010 14:19:04 MDT Print View

McDowell,
Are you wearing boots or trail runners?

McDowell Crook
(mcdcrook) - M

Locale: Southeast
re: snakeproof on 03/29/2010 14:20:32 MDT Print View

I wear trail runners.

I just found a testimonial from a guy who was bitten while wearing some of the Turtleskin snakeproof gaiters here:

http://www.turtleskin.com/SnakeArmor-Testimonials.aspx

Sounds like these are pretty reliable.

Juston Taul
(Junction)

Locale: Atlanta, GA
Outdoor Research on 03/29/2010 14:46:29 MDT Print View

I don't know much about snakes, but I would say they would have a very difficult time getting through Outdoor Research Expedition Gaiters. It's worth a look.

josh wagner
(StainlessSteel) - F
leather on 03/29/2010 14:53:02 MDT Print View

you'll need leather or similar. snakes fangs are just like hypodermic needles. they'll go right through OR's gaiters

suggest checking cowboy ranch websites

Art Sandt
(artsandt) - F
snakeproof this on 03/29/2010 15:10:04 MDT Print View

man: 1, snakes: 0

http://www.medieval-chain-mail-armor.com/SCA-armor-wearable.html

Mark Regalia
(markr) - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz
Forestry Suppliers on 03/29/2010 16:59:32 MDT Print View

Try looking in Forestry-suppliers.com. When I was in that line of work they carried them. Never tried them, though. The Sierra isn't that bad.

They won't be lite-weight though.

McDowell Crook
(mcdcrook) - M

Locale: Southeast
Re: snakeproof this on 03/30/2010 09:20:19 MDT Print View

hahaha! Thanks for the tip. I hear they are making leg guards in lightweight titanium, so I can shave at least three pounds!

brent driggers
(cadyak) - MLife

Locale: southwest georgia
snake boots on 03/30/2010 11:55:19 MDT Print View

I have been wearing one of the more expensive pairs of Rocky snake boots for a few yrs. and they are excellent for hiking as they are waterproof and very light with a vibram sole that feels almost like a running shoe (I have actually run several miles in these shoes). Mine have been everywhere, and have actually taken a moccassin bite with not even a mark on the shoe.
I think that they are called Rocky "rattlers" 15" goretex snake boot.

chris Jackson
(fly4fish) - F
I agree on 07/08/2010 08:42:48 MDT Print View

I agree with a couple of the posts on this forum. First of all, I don't know what type of hiking you do, but over here in the Northwest, most of my hiking is done off trail, so real boots are the only way to go. Even if I walk on trail I still prefer real boots. Nothing gets inside of them and of course they provide a certain level of snake protection.

That being said, I have purchased a pair of the Turtle Skin Snake Armor gaiters and am very happy with them. I do a lot of wet wading (fishing without waders) so I wear my wading boots with shorts, leaving my calves exposed. I had a rattlesnake bite my sole of my boot last year while in mid stride. Why he did not bite my the leg that was on the ground I do not know, I was very lucky. But that is what brought me to by snake gaiters.

I started out buying a cheaper pair for about $60. These were just too hot to wear in the summertime. So I bit the bullet which I should have done in the first place and bought the turtleskin snake gaiters. What a difference it was. They are a fabric and not made out of hard plastics so they are lite, comfortable, and at times unnoticeable. I do notice them when I am bushwhacking as they protect me lower legs from thorns and other things that use to tear my legs up.

Anyway, here is a link to the site where I learned about them and other snake proof gear: href="SnakeGaiters.html">www.snakeproofgear.com

Daniel Fosse
(magillagorilla) - F

Locale: Southwest Ohio
boots on 07/08/2010 10:18:39 MDT Print View

I would go with a full boot. Or a leash trained mongoose.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: leather on 07/08/2010 15:43:59 MDT Print View

> snakes fangs are just like hypodermic needles. they'll go right through OR's gaiters

I beg to disagree slightly here. They may be like blunt hypodermic needles, but a decent pair of Cordura gaiters over socks or clothing will normally handle most snakes. Those snakes with real hole-up-the-middle fangs have short teeth; those with longer teeth usually have channel fangs which are blocked by the Cordura and the socks.

Cheers

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: boots on 07/08/2010 15:45:33 MDT Print View

I'd go with the mongoose.

--B.G.--

Mark Regalia
(markr) - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz
Mongoose won't work with rattlers on 07/09/2010 11:04:59 MDT Print View

A mongoose is good for a slower snake like a cobra but is too slow to take on a pit viper like a rattlesnake. All those years of watching Nat Geo and the Science Channel are paying off.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Mongoose won't work with rattlers on 07/09/2010 14:19:45 MDT Print View

If rattlers are so fast, then how does a California Mountain King Snake kill 'em?

--B.G.--

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: Mongoose won't work with rattlers on 07/09/2010 16:40:57 MDT Print View

"If rattlers are so fast, then how does a California Mountain King Snake kill 'em?"

By being faster.

Mark Regalia
(markr) - MLife

Locale: Santa Cruz
King snakes have another advantage on 07/09/2010 17:44:04 MDT Print View

I seem to remember reading that they are not suseptible to rattler venom. Nice back-up if plan A doesn't work out.