Grand Canyon list
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Greg Lewis
(gpl916) - F

Locale: PNW
Grand Canyon list on 03/10/2010 21:02:00 MST Print View

Hi all,

I am looking for suggestions on my Grand Canyon gear list. It is a four day hike on the Thunder River Trail from May 5th to the 9th. I have never hiked in the desert (or uploaded a gear list here).

It's located in my profile now.


Let me know what you think.

Greg

Edited by gpl916 on 03/10/2010 21:14:16 MST.

Steven Evans
(Steve_Evans) - MLife

Locale: Canada
Re: Grand Canyon list on 03/10/2010 21:06:57 MST Print View

Throw that pdf file into your profile gearlist instead of attaching it as an image...your list is perfect timing as I'm just putting my Zion list together now.

Greg Lewis
(gpl916) - F

Locale: PNW
list on 03/10/2010 21:11:59 MST Print View

Okay- it's in my profile now.

Greg

Edited by gpl916 on 03/10/2010 21:13:33 MST.

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: list on 03/10/2010 21:45:10 MST Print View

I just returned from a 9 day GC trip...

In no particular order -

Tweezers - especailly with trail runners
Scree gaiters
I suggest Ursack Minor for food protection
The Canyon can be rocky. Can your Ti stakes take a pounding?
Long enough cords on the shelter to anchor with rocks?
You Will need a solid sunscreen in May.
SPF lip balm

I killed my shoes on day 2, and salvaged them with SeamGrip. No need to worry if yours are solid. But a small tube of SeamGrip has many uses. (like repairing my air mat.)

Don't know about your food, but some extra salt might be appreciated.

Sounds like a warm, but wonderful trip. Enjoy.

Edited by greg23 on 03/10/2010 21:53:31 MST.

Greg Lewis
(gpl916) - F

Locale: PNW
Re: Re: list on 03/11/2010 11:04:39 MST Print View

Thanks Greg,

I will add the items you suggested. Do you carry any stakes, or just use rocks? I don't think mine would work in too much rock. I may add some accelerade for the salt/ electrolytes issue.

I have been checking into an Ursack but I read somewhere there were food storage containers at the camp sites. Is that correct?

Greg

Travis Leanna
(T.L.) - MLife

Locale: Wisconsin
Re: Re: Re: list on 03/11/2010 11:12:21 MST Print View

Just an option, as I don't know Grand Canyon rules....

Check out Grubpack. They offer a stainless steel mesh bag that the rodents can't chew through, while they have been known to chew through an Ursack. There are multiple sizes, and the medium comes in around 8 ounces.

Greg Lewis
(gpl916) - F

Locale: PNW
grubpack on 03/11/2010 13:26:15 MST Print View

Travis,
I will check that out too. I don't think there are any rules governing food protection from rodents.
Thanks,
greg

Michael B
(mbenvenuto) - F

Locale: Vermont
GC in May on 03/11/2010 13:53:44 MST Print View

I have only been there once, so don't have any particular expertise or insight. But it is was in May, right around when you are going. We were surprised that it was full on winter conditions on the rim, below freezing, snowing heavily, and windy. The trail was snow and ice covered for the first few hundred feet. Looking back on the expected weather for the rim in May, I don't think that was all that unusual. We camped up high, maybe 2/3 of the way back up, on the last night, and it was very cold there that night in the wind. It was essentially summer at the bottom, and the temps warmed up rapidly as we dropped in.

But a hat and light gloves would be worth considering, even bringing to the rim just in case. If you are camping anywhere above the bottom, I would also think about a light layer for under the pants.

We cached food and water for the last night, so we didn't have to carry that. I used just a lightest plastic food storage container from the grocery store. I am sure a rodent could have chewed in; but it was mostly odor proof and plastic containers are used all the time to deter mice. So that would be the almost free option for food.

I hung our food off a small ledge at camp down at the bottom. Probably not a good idea, but was the best I could come up with. That was actually attacked by crows, but we happened to come back just then.

enjoy the trip.

Greg Mihalik
(greg23) - M

Locale: Colorado
Re: list on 03/11/2010 16:14:57 MST Print View

Stakes - I use Easton Aluminum 8" (0.50 ounces each). They drive well. They can be buried in sand. They will stay under a rock pile when attached to my 24" tie-outs, eliminating the need (and additional cord length) to "tie off" to a rock.

Desiginated campsites do have ammo boxes - everything in the main corridor. "At Large" sites generally do not. Call the Backcountry Information Office on your sites if you're not sure. Food protection is not required in "At Large" areas, but if anyone has been there before you, it's a good bet that you will have critter problems. Critters chew their way into my tent about 50% of the time just looking for food.

Ursack Minor weights about 3 ounces, serves as your food bag, and nestle easily into your pack. (No vested interest on my part - I just like them.)

Greg Lewis
(gpl916) - F

Locale: PNW
re; GC list on 03/11/2010 17:02:09 MST Print View

Michael,
I was wondering about the weather too. From what I have read, the road into the North rim can be closed from snow into May. I have also been told to expect temps of 100F. I do have synthetic long johns on the list and can pair them with my shorts, pants, and reeds rain pants. we had planned on cacheing water. but leaving food is a great idea too.

The first day on thunder river is 9.5 miles and down into the Canyon to Upper Tapeats. That should be nice- hiking down to the warmth.

Greg,
Thanks for the info. I will look into different stakes and have a line on a used ursack minor.

gl

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
warmth on 03/11/2010 17:45:34 MST Print View

Greg,

Overall, your list looks good. Light is definitly very right in the canyon.

Some notes:

-I wouldn't worry about rodents too much. Just a stuffsack for food will be fine.
-Unless you camp above 6k, I think your insulation should be fine.
-I wouldn't worry about snow on the trail. Unlike the south rim stuff, the TR trail faces mostly south. Snow on the road could be an issue. Call the North Kaibab office in Fredonia for info.
-Scree gaiter for sure.
-Sun screen for sure.
-I never brought stakes in the canyon. You're almost always camping on either rocky gravel, bare rock, or sand. Bring a bit more guyline instead.
-A headnet? For what?
-If you wear the New Balances, make sure you have strong ankles. Train hiking with a load down hill if at all possible, going down it what gets most people.
-I'd strongly urge you to use trekking poles. IMO nowhere are they more beneficial.
-I presume you have more than 2 liters of water capacity? You'll almost certainly need more for the hike out.
-I'd make sure to bring electrolyte drink, and some snacks you like in the heat that are salty. Temps in the canyon in May can be a real mixed bag.

-I almost forgot the most important thing: bring a camera!!

Edited by DaveC on 03/11/2010 17:47:35 MST.

Greg Lewis
(gpl916) - F

Locale: PNW
Re: warmth on 03/11/2010 18:00:26 MST Print View

Dave,
Thanks for the input. The headnet is kind of an oversight. I just copied this list off my general 3 season and changed where appropriate. I assume no mosquitos then?

On the list you will notice that there are two, 2L platys, so 4L all together. What do recommend starting with, assuming a cache part way down?

The other items that you and Greg have recommended will absolutely be added, including the camera! I guess I will have to try some poles. Mentally, they just don't work for me.

Oh yeah, I will definitely get some serious mileage on my mt100's (when they arrive) before I bring them.

Thanks,
gl

Edited by gpl916 on 03/11/2010 18:04:02 MST.

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
bugs and water on 03/11/2010 18:05:34 MST Print View

No bugs in the canyon. The GC is a place like Yellowstone, its hard to take a bad picture. Just haul a simple one and snap casually.

As for water, that's tough. It really depends on your pace and the temp. 4 liters is a good minimum per person for a day. I usually carried a six liter dromedary in the desert.