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Osprey or Golite
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James Ayres
(traveler) - F

Locale: SoCal
Osprey or Golite on 03/08/2010 13:02:52 MST Print View

Hello,

I’ve been reviewing packs and am considering two possibilities: the Osprey Talon 33 and the Golite Peak. Both are at REI, both are the same general size and price. But they are quite different in design. Could anyone offer me some input on these packs?

Thanks in advance,

Jim

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
Osprey on 03/08/2010 13:20:53 MST Print View

From just looking at the online descriptions I like the Osprey Talon 44. More features and better suspension.

Evan McCarthy
(evanrussia) - MLife

Locale: Northern Europe
Osprey or Golite on 03/08/2010 13:24:04 MST Print View

I'm considering the Golite Peak, if only because of weight and simplicity.

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
"...weight and simplicity" on 03/08/2010 13:27:40 MST Print View

Evan,

Better test both out with the same load for the same amount of time. GoLite may be better for your body but I know Osprey works well for me. I'd rather have the comfort of fit and shave ounces elswhere.

Eric

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: Osprey or Golite on 03/08/2010 14:56:39 MST Print View

What is it for? Your main travel pack? Day pack?

James Ayres
(traveler) - F

Locale: SoCal
reply to Adrian on 03/08/2010 15:08:42 MST Print View

Hi Benjamin,

Well, we're thinking about getting two of them, one each. They would be our everything bag while traveling for about six months.

Thanks to all for any input or suggestions.

Jim

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: James on 03/08/2010 15:13:22 MST Print View

Who's Adrian?

Between the two, I would go for the Golite Peak. The dyneema material (as mentioned) is light and suffiently tough (if you take care not to abuse it). Have you also looked at the Golite Litespeed? They're now on sale -- with men and women's models. The Litespeed may be more convenient to use.

James Ayres
(traveler) - F

Locale: SoCal
reply to benjamin on 03/08/2010 15:23:04 MST Print View

Hello Benjamin,

Adrian was a previous email, sorry didn't check the header.

I'll go look at the lightspeed. Thanks for the tip.

Question about dyneema: I saw an Ion about 2 years ago, very nice fabric, also looked tough. Last week I saw a Jam, and the fabric, while the same visually was very heavy and stiff. Any idea what's up with that?

Jim

James Ayres
(traveler) - F

Locale: SoCal
reply to benjamin on 03/08/2010 16:45:49 MST Print View

Hi Benjamin,

Looked at the Lightspeed. Would really prefer a top loader. But thanks.

Jim

David Chenault
(DaveC) - BPL Staff - F

Locale: Crown of the Continent
horses for courses on 03/08/2010 22:19:44 MST Print View

Hey Jim, it really depends on what features you want.

The Golite is a dead simple pack. The Gridstop is tough stuff, and the design has little to go wrong.

On the other hand, Osprey's design and craftsmanship are properly reknowned. I have a Talon 11 and a 22, and both are excellent packs. They are extremely stable on the back and have lots of pockets for quick accessory access. Great for mountain biking and skiing, as well as hiking all day and still being able to get to snacks, water, camera, etc without removing the pack. The fabric is perfectly durable, but not my first choice for bushwacking or canyoneering.

The complexity of the Talon has benefits that may or may not be worth it depending on your use and preferences.

I will also add that IMO, the Talon shoulder straps are the best design out there.

James Ayres
(traveler) - F

Locale: SoCal
reply to david on 03/08/2010 23:46:47 MST Print View

David,

Thank you. Good to get some hands on info.

I thought REI had both of these packs, and they do - on line. To actually see and touch them I would have to buy them and have them shipped to a store, then return the one I didn't want. Pain in the neck. Especially when we need two packs, one for my wife, one for me.

I know the usual advice is get all your gear first, then get your pack. But we have certain specific needs that limits us to packs in this general size range, so we have to find good packs, then figure out what gear we can take.

The local REI (I'm in LA) has a wall of giant packs - 50 to 80 liters - and a wall of daypacks, but nothing in this range. Sure would like to SEE some small light packs like you folks post about here.

Absent that, thanks again for any comments for anyone with hands on experience of these packs- or other similar ones.

Jim

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: on 03/08/2010 23:58:43 MST Print View

"To actually see and touch them I would have to buy them and have them shipped to a store, then return the one I didn't want. Pain in the neck."

Why? Buying one backpack or three online is more or less the same effort. And when you go to REI, just open up the box and try them out right there -- not much different than trying out packs that are on display. Indeed, when I've narrowed my choices to the final few and I can't discern any further without doing an actual comparison, then I'll just order them all. It's nothing more than making sure that when I go to the store, all the items I am interested in will be there for me to try out / compare!

At the end, keep whatever you like and return the rest right then and there. It's not that hard. Really. And considering how critical comfort and fit are -- and how much better it is to choose when you can actually see and touch the items -- it is well worth the very, very slight additional effort on your part.

Edited by ben2world on 03/09/2010 00:26:49 MST.

James Ayres
(traveler) - F

Locale: SoCal
Benjamin on 03/09/2010 00:36:56 MST Print View

You're right.

Guess I'm just "old school," as my sons tell me. I was thinking that it was also an inconvenience for the retailer and caused him extra trouble and cost.

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: James on 03/09/2010 09:43:28 MST Print View

My view -- ordering 3 things and maybe keep 1 is not an inconvenience for the retailer at all. A "worthy" retailer should ideally have everything in stock -- in all available sizes and colors -- to give customers the ability to try out, to compare.

Now retailers save a lot of money (e.g. rent, etc.) by keeping only the more popular items on hand. Unfortunately for me -- using clothing as an example -- that often means a lot of clothing in sizes XL and up -- and far fewer in my "M" size. My "ordering" is simply a way of ensuring that the items I am interested in trying out will be at the store on my next visit.

And when I return the stuff I don't want right at the store (or even soon after trying them out more extensively at home though not on the trail) -- the items can (and will) still be sold as 'new' to other customers.

Edited by ben2world on 03/09/2010 09:45:34 MST.

Hikin' Jim
(hikin_jim) - MLife

Locale: Orange County, CA, USA
At the store... on 03/09/2010 13:17:40 MST Print View

I'm surprised to hear that the Talon 33 isn't in the shop. I've seen them in some local shops (I'm also in LA). You could check at another REI or at A16 or Sport Chalet if you want to see one -- or you could as others have suggested just order both to the store and try it on at the store. Return on the spot the one you don't want.

I have the 33, and I like it. It's not super durable, so like others it's not my pick for canyoneering or brush. In brush the water bottle pockets really pick up leaves and junk. But for the open trail, it's a very comfortable pack. I've used it for quick overnighters in the San Gabriel mountains in fair weather. It does quite well.

Can't comment about the Golite in question although I have a Golite Quest and really like it.

HJ

James Ayres
(traveler) - F

Locale: SoCal
Reply on 03/09/2010 21:56:50 MST Print View

Hi Jim,

I did finally find an Osprey 33 at Sport Chalet. I see what you mean about the fabric. It's seems to be of very high quality, but kind of fragile. Or maybe it's tougher than it looks. Nicely made, but not sure if it's for me. Haven't see the Golite Peak yet.

I had narrowed my search down to these two. Maybe I should again widen it.

Thanks,
Jim

Hendrik Morkel
(skullmonkey) - MLife

Locale: Finland
Cottages on 03/10/2010 02:05:04 MST Print View

James, have you considered gear from cottages? I am thinking about the ULA Conduit, for example, and also a Gossamer Gear Murmur or a MLD Burn could suit your needs. All three excellent packs, and made in the US.

James Ayres
(traveler) - F

Locale: SoCal
Hendrik on 03/10/2010 16:17:01 MST Print View

Hi Hendrik,

Thanks for your response. Yes, I have. In fact I'm very interested in GG. But I sent them an email last week and still have not received a reply. I'm leaving in a few weeks and can't wait too long.

I've decided that I'm not going to worry about durability in lightweight fabrics. I have a 20 year old Sportsac duffle (1.8 oz ripstop) that I've dragged around the world, literally, at least six times - often checking it on airlines. It's beat up but still good to go.

Cheers,

Jim

Hendrik Morkel
(skullmonkey) - MLife

Locale: Finland
Re: Hendrik on 03/11/2010 13:48:06 MST Print View

Hei Jim,

GG are in the process of re-doing their website so I believe Grant is busy. I'm sure if you ask your questions here, all the other GG owners could help you out in case GG themselves don't get back to you - we're sort of a service desk here ;)

James Ayres
(traveler) - F

Locale: SoCal
GG on 03/11/2010 16:53:09 MST Print View

Hei Hendrik,

Thanks for your suggestion. Folks here do seem to be very helpful. Here goes: I'm looking for a minimum outfit to travel with in Asia and Europe over a six to eight month period. My outfit must be small in volume and light, very light, in weight. I’m new to this generation of ultralight gear, but enthused about it because it looks like to would work for me.

GG in particular seems to have a handle on the whole approach.

Point One: using a pad in the back, they save much volume in the main sack. This seems like a good idea, but I’m not sure how it actually works out. Does it go in that slot sideways” How tall is it? How much volume does the pad require?

Point Two: the outside netting pockets seem to be iffy for a traveler in that they look as if they would snag on luggage racks and every other thing that sticks out in buses, etc. I’m sure they’re fine for trail hiking, but we will be doing little of that until we arrive in Italy.

I would like to hear from anyone who would care to comment on these points.

Thanks,

Jim