Forum Index » Make Your Own Gear » Silk


Display Avatars Sort By:
Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Silk on 03/02/2010 20:22:23 MST Print View

I've never worked with silk before, and I probably haven't even touched the stuff in 20 years. I thought about making a "sleep sack" to line a normal sleeping bag.

What is the normal thread to use on a normal sewing machine? I have all sorts of polyester.
--B.G.--

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Silk on 03/02/2010 22:27:25 MST Print View

Most any light thread is fine. Don't make the tension too high.
.
Silk SB Liner 7925
.
Hot night - Sue was initially sleeping just in her silk liner. MYOG - ThaiSilks for the fabric, 8 mm Habotai.

Cheers

Lori Pontious
(lori999)

Locale: Central Valley
Re: Silk on 03/02/2010 22:31:01 MST Print View

I'm making a silk hammock out of 10mm silk from Thai Silks. Good stuff. Just using the Gutterman's polyester thread that was already in the machine. Like any light fabric, a fine needle and careful tensioning are necessary.

Jeffs Eleven
(WoodenWizard) - F

Locale: Greater Mt Tabor
Roger on 03/02/2010 22:32:37 MST Print View

After a few years of studying your posts- is there ANY piece of your kit that you HAVEN'T made/ modded?

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Silk on 03/02/2010 22:38:48 MST Print View

I'm still pretty new to the sewing machine, so I will attempt to fool with the thread tension dial. Thanks.

--B.G.--

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Roger on 03/03/2010 02:24:04 MST Print View

Hi Jeff

> is there ANY piece of your kit that you HAVEN'T made/ modded?

Oh yes, to be sure.
Titanium pots - untouched MSR Titan 1.5 L
Compass - untouched Brunton 7DNL (although I am experimenting with refilling a different one)
Folding knife - Benchmade 530, although I did take the clip off it (two screws)
Shoes in general
Socks (Darn Tough Vermont Full Boot Socks)
Underwear (Ex Officio Give-n-Go Briefs)
Air Mat (Therm-a-Rest Deluxe LE and ProLite)
Eating stuff (GSI nForm bowls and Cascadian cups, GSI Lexan spoons)
Steve Evans carbon fibre and titanium ice axe (he made it)

and ...
Cocoon Jacket (although I did rebuild one to add a Cocoon hood to it).
Rain pants (GoLite Whims - although I added a flare at the ankle to one pair to fit over my shoes)

As for the rest ... well ... yeah ... :-)

Cheers

Edited by rcaffin on 03/03/2010 02:24:43 MST.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Good Grief! on 03/04/2010 15:18:35 MST Print View

I ordered four yards of silk from Thai Silks, placed just before midnight on 3/2. Before noon on 3/3, I received email notice that it had shipped. Just after noon on 3/4, I received it.

Four yards (48" width) weighs 3.56 ounces. Amazing.

They ought to crossbreed silk worms with cuben fiber critters.

--B.G.--

Corey Miller
(coreyfmiller) - F

Locale: Eastern Canada
Thinking of doing this too on 03/04/2010 16:21:49 MST Print View

I was thinking of doing the same. Though I was curious as to how much warmth I would get from one of these. Maybe a better alternative for myself would be a lightweight fleece?

I wouldnt want too much heat but a few degrees would be alright

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Thinking of doing this too on 03/04/2010 16:35:35 MST Print View

You won't get much extra insulation from the silk liner. It isn't that thick!

What you will get are two things:

1) a liner keeps your bag or quilt clean, which maintains the warmth in the long run

2) a liner blocks drafts, which can be a lot more benefit than you might think in cold weather.

Cheers
PS: That ignores the use of the liner in place of a quilt in hot weather, but that works mainly because of item 2.

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
silk on 03/04/2010 16:37:11 MST Print View

If you want warmth, marry a polar bear.

Silk comes in different weights, and maybe somebody with experience can testify to which one is most effective. Fleece is obviously warmer, but with an obvious weight penalty. There are thin down liners, as well.

--B.G.--

Joshua Griffin
(JoshuaJayG) - F

Locale: The Sticks
Silk! on 03/04/2010 16:37:23 MST Print View

Hmm, never thought about a silk liner for my bag. That would be pretty good. I have the Kelty wicking liner for my lightyear 20 degree bag, but it weighs over a pound, so I can't justify taking it with my anymore. Is habotai the best silk for such a use?I up for ordering five yards of 45", that's cheap!

Joshua

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: Boosting Bag Warmth with a Silk Liner on 03/04/2010 16:46:44 MST Print View

You can expect a 2-3F temp boost. Silk liners are basically there to help keep your bag cleaner by keeping your body oils away.

Corey Miller
(coreyfmiller) - F

Locale: Eastern Canada
Thanks! on 03/04/2010 16:53:18 MST Print View

Ah interesting! Thanks, maybe this is exactly what I need then.

Cheers!

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
a silk liner on 03/04/2010 16:56:58 MST Print View

I saw one vendor rate its silk sleeping bag liner to provide +9.5 degrees F of warmth, and I just couldn't quite accept that. A few degrees, maybe.
--B.G.--

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Silk! on 03/04/2010 19:55:11 MST Print View

> Is habotai the best silk for such a use?
I have used Thai Silks.
8 momme Habotai is suitable (in picture), and comes in a range of colours. Type 026A-xxx See
http://www.thaisilks.com/product_info.php?cPath=1_2&products_id=15

Cheers

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Re: Silk on 03/08/2010 00:07:51 MST Print View

The silk sleeping bag liner finished out at 2.01 ounces.

Wow. You think sil-nylon is hard to work with. You ought to try thin silk.

I wonder if they make titanium safety pins?
--B.G.--

Sergiy Sosnytskiy
(ssv310)

Locale: Ukraine
Re: Re: Thinking of doing this too on 03/10/2010 02:56:32 MST Print View

"a liner blocks drafts, which can be a lot more benefit than you might think in cold weather."

Roger,
Do you have any recommendations about size and shape of a liner? Should they be the same as those of the bag, or may be the liner girth should be a bit larger?

Jeremy Greene
(tippymcstagger) - F

Locale: North Texas
Re: Re: Re: Thinking of doing this too on 03/10/2010 12:02:05 MST Print View

I'd actually say to make the liner smaller than the bag (within reason). I think a large part of the warmth experienced with a liner is from keeping the feet and elbows from compressing the insulation.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Re: Re: Thinking of doing this too on 03/10/2010 14:30:10 MST Print View

> any recommendations about size and shape of a liner?
We (my wife and I) found that the liner needs to be a bit larger than the SB in practice. The idea of having it smaller to avoid compressing the SB is a good one, but it didn't work out that way in practice.

The liner, being very light silk, does tend to get a bit wrapped around you during the night. If it is smaller than the SB this can be so restrictive that you risk accidentally bursting it - or at least you wake up in total frustration! I find that Sue likes hers about 90+ cm wide - and I make it rectangular as well. These days she uses a quilt instead of an SB, but the need for reasonable width still holds of course.

I moved to making all-encompassing silk pygamas for myself, with hood and feet covers (the latter are a tougher poly-cotton). The first shirt I made was a nice fit for a shirt - but it split down the back when I turned over one night and hunched my shoulders! You need a fair bit of slack for pygamas as well as for a liner.

Cheers

Jeremy Greene
(tippymcstagger) - F

Locale: North Texas
. on 03/10/2010 16:49:16 MST Print View

.

Edited by tippymcstagger on 04/11/2012 06:46:38 MDT.