Forum Index » Post-Trip Reports » Going to Vegas, Death valley or Lake Mead


Display Avatars Sort By:
Jarod Fleming
(flemdawg1) - F

Locale: SE US
Going to Vegas, Death valley or Lake Mead on 02/25/2010 17:37:32 MST Print View

I'll be going to LV in mid-march for a conference and would like to get a weekend section, Thursday afternoon-Sunday morn. Can anyone recommend a weekend loop? Also should I tarp or tent (scorpions/snakes)?

John Brochu
(JohnnyBgood4) - F

Locale: New Hampshire
Re: Going to Vegas, Death valley or Lake Mead on 02/26/2010 08:05:56 MST Print View

See what you can find on Red Rocks Canyon just outside the city limits. I've only been there rock climbing, but I think you could do some overnight hikes in the vicinity. It's BLM land and overnight camping is restricted in some areas, but there might be some options.

Maybe someone with better local knowledge can chime in and help you?

James Arriola
(Ravs4fun) - M

Locale: Desert Southwest
Las Vegas area hikes on 02/26/2010 12:24:48 MST Print View

Red Rock is a great place for day hikes or climbing. You might be able to do an overnighter at Red Rock but have to be above 5,000 feet to camp out. You will need to get a permit from the BLM vistor center for overnight trips.

Another great place for day hikes is Valley of Fire State park which is about an hour drive from Las Vegas. You aren't allowed to camp in the backcountry at Valley of Fire though.

Death Valley is another good place for backcountry trips. Look at the NPS website for suggestions.

I would also suggest also at looking at Zion Nat'l Park. It's an 3 hour drive from Las Vegas but has lots of backcountry options. It's hard to say what the snow situation might be on both the West and East Rims but it's worth looking into.

Lake Mead is another possiblity but you would have to do a lot of cross country travel and carry lots of water.

Let me know if you have any other questions since I live in Las Vegas. Thanks.

James

Arthur Yates
(RowdyY) - F

Locale: North Central Tennessee
Las Vegas Hiking on 02/26/2010 13:01:06 MST Print View

James,
What about Mt. Charleston? Isn't there some high country hiking trails there?

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Going to Vegas, Death valley or Lake Mead on 02/28/2010 02:58:40 MST Print View

Jarod,

I did a trip report in January on a loop I did near Lake Mead. You might find it helpful.

There is hiking in the Spring Mountains and Mt Charleston, but they have gotten a lot of snow, so check conditions.

Tarp or tent for rain only. Critters won't bother you, unless you bother them.

Hiking Malto
(gg-man) - F
Death Valley on 02/28/2010 07:20:05 MST Print View

Cottonwood/Marble Canyon is a very nice hike in DV. 30 mile loop which can be added to with some exploration of other side canyons. Very cool. I normally sleep under the stars in DV.

Edited by gg-man on 02/28/2010 07:24:09 MST.

James Arriola
(Ravs4fun) - M

Locale: Desert Southwest
Mt Charleston on 03/01/2010 10:32:55 MST Print View

There are some pretty nice trails in the Mt. Charleston area in either Kyle or Lee Canyon. The issue with going in mid March is the amount of snow that will still be there.

The ski area in Lee Canyon has something like over a 6 foot base right now and that will probably last until mid May. Otherwise in the summer time it's a great hiking destination. Thanks.

Jarod Fleming
(flemdawg1) - F

Locale: SE US
Thanks on 03/04/2010 12:30:12 MST Print View

Thanks for all the ideas guys. Unfortunately, my trip has been canceled.

Jarod Fleming
(flemdawg1) - F

Locale: SE US
trip back on. on 03/12/2010 10:38:25 MST Print View

Well at the last minute they tell me I'm going again. I think I might try that Cotonwood/Marble Canyon/Deadhorse loop @ DV.

Jarod Fleming
(flemdawg1) - F

Locale: SE US
DV gear Qs on 03/12/2010 11:03:32 MST Print View

Should I bring my 15deg or 40 deg down bag?
Tarp or tent?
How much water should I be carrying?

Bob Gross
(--B.G.--) - F

Locale: Silicon Valley
Cottonwood Canyon on 03/12/2010 13:29:20 MST Print View

At the last time that I day hiked there in mid-March, it was warm but not hot. I hiked 16 miles RT that day, starting at 8 a.m. I had assumed that 2.5 quarts of water would be plenty. However, by the time I dragged back to my car late that afternoon, I had been dry for the last mile or so. It's deceptive there, because even when the weather is not quite hot, it is still very dry.

When hiking there, it is best to find the springs so that you can replenish as you go along. Further south, there are some springs that are absolutely phenomenal.
--B.G.--