Forum Index » Philosophy & Technique » How steep of a slope can you sleep on?


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Andy F
(AndyF) - M

Locale: Midwest/Midatlantic
How steep of a slope can you sleep on? on 01/29/2010 11:10:44 MST Print View

How steep of a slope can you sleep on, and how do you accomplish this without using a hammock or climbing gear?

With my painter's dropcloth groundsheet and CCF pad or Exped Downmat, I need to be very close to flat to avoid impromptu or imperceptible sled trips during the night.

j lan
(justaddfuel) - F

Locale: MN
Re: How steep of a slope can you sleep on? on 01/29/2010 11:47:30 MST Print View

Nothing that a couple tent stakes through your bag and sleeping mat can't fix!
;)

Have you tried putting some seam sealer stripes on your mats to increase grippiness?

Nick Gatel
(ngatel) - MLife

Locale: Southern California
Re: Re: How steep of a slope can you sleep on? on 01/29/2010 19:29:53 MST Print View

I can't sleep on much of a slope. During the night my body tries to find a level spot, without my permission. If I abosultely cannot find a level enough area, I sleep with my feet elevated on the low end with my pack. Sometimes this helps.

Walter Carrington
(Snowleopard) - M

Locale: Mass.
Slip sliding. on 01/29/2010 21:48:27 MST Print View

I think my record for sliding during the night is more than 10 feet. Fortunately, no cliffs anywhere in the area.

Alex H
(abhitt) - MLife

Locale: southern appalachians or desert SW
Re: How steep of a slope can you sleep on? on 01/30/2010 03:54:33 MST Print View

As long as you are parallel to the slope a large rock or log at the foot of the sleeping bag works great to keep you from sliding down hill. I have used a large rock under sloping overhangs on the Colorado Plateau for this before.

Brad Groves
(4quietwoods) - MLife

Locale: Michigan
Re: How steep of a slope can you sleep on? on 01/30/2010 08:28:23 MST Print View

It ain't pretty, but if I set up so that I'm sideways to a slope, I just shove stuff sacks, shoes, random stuff under the "downhill" side of the sleeping pad to sort of level it out...

Mike Philip
(mphilip) - F
been there done that... on 02/10/2010 14:27:38 MST Print View

It ain't pretty, but if I set up so that I'm sideways to a slope, I just shove stuff sacks, shoes, random stuff under the "downhill" side of the sleeping pad to sort of level it out..."

Brad,

Just thinking about that makes me laugh...:)

I did this last year when a buddy and I packed in late one night. We could hear the wind really whistling on top of the ridge so we decided to stay 200 yards down the hill. It was pretty steep, probably 35-40 degrees and try as we might we could not find any elk/sheep beds to sleep in so we just improvised. He found a bush to wedge his bivy against and I used a rotten log on the down hill side...at 3am I awoke to find myself rolling down the hill 15 feet into a tree...It scared the crap out of me and pour Gary just about p!ssed his pants he was laughing so hard.

To do it again I think I would have used the paracord in my pack to secure the log to a couple of trees and it would have saved me the adventure...

Mike

Simon Weiss
(SimonGtr) - MLife

Locale: Bay Area
RE: been there done that... on 02/21/2010 23:47:40 MST Print View

That's a great story - I laughed out loud imagining that. Glad you weren't hurt.

I've had those dreams where I fall, with that adrenalized feeling of falling and jerking awake. I've never woken up ACTUALLY falling...

thanks for sharing.

I think we need to start a FUNNY BACKPACKING STORIES thread.

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: How steep of a slope can you sleep on? on 02/22/2010 00:53:00 MST Print View

Well, these guys had a small problem with finding horizontal for the night - I think they were in thick fog late in the day when they finally decided they couldn't go any further.
And NO, I was NOT in that party!
Kahanmoku2
(Not my photo, but I can't trace owners. Sorry.)

Tipi Walter
(TipiWalter) - F
Tilted Camps on 02/22/2010 08:00:13 MST Print View

I've spent many nights on tilted ground, whether bedroll camping or in a tent. On my last trip I had to throw my beefy Mystery Ranch G6000 pack under my thermarest at the foot to prop up my dangling legs, etc.

One good thing about backpacking in the southeast is that you can find old fallen tree hollows on the sides of hills that offer little level areas where the rootball pulled out of the ground and settled over time into an adequate campsite. Tiny, though.

Ike Mouser
(isaac.mouser) - F
hammocks rule on 02/24/2010 08:53:14 MST Print View

This issue is precisely why i now use hammocks on nearly every trip where its possible. No more looking for level ground for me. Or clearing a site either for a tent either. Love my hammock.

Jarrod Handwerk
(PA_Hiker) - F

Locale: Orwigsburg PA
Hammock on 02/26/2010 12:59:47 MST Print View

Same here...Hammocks all the way