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Casey Bowden
(clbowden) - MLife

Locale: Berkeley Hills
Lighten Your Heaviest Gear: You on 12/18/2009 13:35:25 MST Print View

Michael Pollan put it well:

"Eat food, not too much, mostly plants."

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: Lighten Your Heaviest Gear: You on 12/18/2009 14:31:22 MST Print View

"Michael Pollan put it well:

"Eat food, not too much, mostly plants.""

+1! I also like something else he said (paraphrasing, I think): If your grandmother wouldn't recognize it, don't eat it!

John Donewar
(Newton) - MLife

Locale: Southeastern Louisiana
"Lighten Your Heaviest Gear: You!" & Something I learned on the AT on 12/18/2009 16:27:21 MST Print View

Jeremy this was a great and very insightful article. Likening my body weight that I carry with me everywhere to the weight of the gear in my pack and how I judge what should go in it or get left behind opened my eyes.

At 5 feet 9 inches and @220 pounds I hereby declare myself a "fatboy". My weight has hovered around this point for quite a few years.

In 2008 my wife's cousin introduced me to hiking and the AT. I was a dedicated newbie with an overweight pack riding an overweight hiker. I took many long practice walks with my pack in preperation for our trek.

We left out of Hot Springs, NC on a summer hike with me carrying over 8 pounds of water. I learned very quickly that this fatboy prespires heavily. Water was consumed quickly to replace what was lost. My water bottles and hydration reservoir needed to be refilled often. This naturally added back the weight of the water. I was working harder, drinking more and prespiring more. It was a viscious cycle.

Despite the difficulty I was hooked on hiking!

Since then I have lightened my load from @34 pounds to 15 pounds which includes 2 liters of water. I spent many hours searching out the lightest gear that would serve my purpose. I have sewn my own 9.7 ounce SUL pack. I was determined to succeed in lightening the load.

Looking at what I eat and put into my body in the same manner as what I choose to put into my pack makes perfect sense to me.

I have lightened my pack by 19 pounds. If I were 19 or more pounds lighter my hammock that I carry could have been 1 pound lighter than the model which I currently own. The hipbelt on my pack would fit and work better if my hips were not so well hidden.

I read in another post about a theory that reducing your pack weight by half would allow you to walk 3 times as far. If this is true I look forward to the day when my body weight is reduced to a point where I can walk many more enjoyable miles on the trail.

I am once again dedicated to lightening the load. My pack load is light enough. It is now time to lighten the pack mule here-to-fore referred to as "fatboy".

Party On ! 2010

Newton

Edited by Newton on 12/18/2009 20:08:10 MST.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: Shrinking triglycerides on 12/18/2009 17:04:25 MST Print View

"shrinking of triglycerides"

Brian,

Could you explain to me how one goes about shrinking a triglyceride? Sounds like some serious alchemy going on here.

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: lighten yourself on 12/18/2009 17:10:31 MST Print View

"I dropped more fat than intended and at my current 5ish percent I couldn't go out for too many consecutive days without putting myself at severe risk. I also found that if I don't eat right before bed and I'm pushing a sleep system I'll wake up in the middle of the night cold due to running out of fuel to burn."

Sounds like you have zero margin for error, Chris, which can be dangerous in the mountains come emergency time. Maybe it's time to consider putting on a couple of pounds?

I know, it's none of my business. Just sayin'...

Chris W
(simplespirit) - MLife

Locale: WNC
Re: Re: Re: lighten yourself on 12/18/2009 17:33:37 MST Print View

I'm trying. I upped my calories to around 3k a day (a lot for 145 lb guy) a couple of months ago and continued leaning out.

Having fat fear doesn't help since I'm afraid to keep upping calories.

I have a small amount of margin, but yes, it could get dangerous on a long trip or if a disaster occurred. I'd probably be alright for 5-7 day trips but beyond that could get sketchy without resupply.

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: Re: Re: Shrinking triglycerides on 12/18/2009 17:59:27 MST Print View

"Could you explain to me how one goes about shrinking a triglyceride?"

Geez Tom! It's simple! Everyone knows that triglycerides are made of wool. Just wash them in hot water!

Jeremy Pendrey
(Pendrey) - MLife

Locale: California
Re: "Lighten Your Heaviest Gear: You!" & Something I learned on the AT on 12/18/2009 19:20:44 MST Print View

John: Thanks. I'm glad you feel inspired.

One thing I want to emphasize is that for the changes to really take hold and become the way you live, be ready for a long haul of micro changes that add up over time. Try to focus on one change at a time. It is very much a trial and error, two steps forward, one step backward kind of process, but a process that is very rewarding, so worth the time and effort.

Good luck.
-Jeremy

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: Re: Re: Shrinking triglycerides on 12/18/2009 20:29:28 MST Print View

"Geez Tom! It's simple! Everyone knows that triglycerides are made of wool. Just wash them in hot water."

Hot water, huh?

We gotta stop now, Douglas. Brian's gonna think we're picking on him. ;}

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: Re: Re: lighten yourself on 12/18/2009 20:32:19 MST Print View

"Having fat fear doesn't help since I'm afraid to keep upping calories."

That's a tough nut to crack, Chris. Maybe as time goes on, and you get used to the idea that your new body isn't going away, the fear will go away as well. Meantime, my respect for honing yourself down to a lean, mean hiking machine. That can't have been easy.

YAMABUSHI !
(THUNDERHORSE) - F
Re: Re: Re: Pecs and Biceps on 12/19/2009 12:47:54 MST Print View

I feel compelled to comment on the crossfit thing...

for your average or slightly less than average joe or jane crossfit may be a great improvement to your fitness and for that its sufficient.

but like p90x, insanity, tower 200:

http://www.officialtower200.com/default.aspx?adid=bbj1003

(WHICH WILL APPARENTLY HELP YOU BECOME UFC CHAMP OR FEND OF HIGHSCHOOL BULLIES AT YOUR 10 YEAR REUNION)

or any other aptly named "program" it is just watered down sports training programs, with some good and bad parts, extracted into a laughably "futuristic" lululemon smelling confection.

there are definately some athletes on BPL and they may or may not weigh in on this (and their disciplines)but as an athlete of the power sport variety i can attest to crossfit being insufficient for alot of things.

without getting too crazy into details and internutz chatter its worth noting, several respectable trainers who are/were on the masters and pro level of their respective disciplines, have gone seperate ways from crossfit.

my issue with crossfit is how watered down it is...should a girl who jogs occasionally and was a cheerleader 15 years ago be teaching you olympic lifts?

NO.

oh but you can do handstands and muscle ups so im supposed trust you "expert" opinion!!!!

GTFO MY FACE!

and because she was given a sh*t education on that particular subject YOU are at risk for injury.

that being my main concern.

you are not going to train for an Ultra running 20 mins a day. inversely you arent snatching 2x your body weight by doing 20 mins of handstand pushups.

A well rounded body is great. dont get me wrong and crossfit does well for the average joe looking to break out of the bell curve.

but if mastery is your goal and you desire Übermensch Status you need to pick a sport/discipline and follow it.

Learn its history.

PERIOD.

Brian UL
(MAYNARD76)

Locale: New England
Re: Re: Re: Shrinking triglycerides on 12/20/2009 05:37:50 MST Print View

"Could you explain to me how one goes about shrinking a triglyceride? Sounds like some serious alchemy going on here."

That wasn't the most scientific way to put it it shoud read:
As VLDLs lose triglycerides they shrink in size, becoming Low Density Lipoproteins LDLs

Tom Kirchner
(ouzel) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest/Sierra
Re: Re: Re: Re: Shrinking triglycerides on 12/20/2009 17:36:41 MST Print View

"That wasn't the most scientific way to put it it shoud read:
As VLDLs lose triglycerides they shrink in size, becoming Low Density Lipoproteins LDLs"

Ah, now I at least understand what you were getting at. Thanks, Brian.

Lynn Tramper
(retropump) - F

Locale: The Antipodes of La Coruna
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Shrinking triglycerides on 12/20/2009 18:17:41 MST Print View

I still don't understand :(

"heart disease, artery blockage, cancer ect are caused by inflammation of the arterys, shrinking of triglycerides and other things by sugars and carbs"

Insulin promoting foods cause an increase in blood triglycerides and VLDL, not a shrinking..

Brian UL
(MAYNARD76)

Locale: New England
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Shrinking triglycerides on 12/20/2009 19:02:24 MST Print View

"If we eat too many refined sugar foods and do not "exercise, the high insulin level triggers the liver to produce more Very Low Density Lipoproteins (VLDL), which is a main carrier of triglyceride.
-very low density lipoproteins (VLDL), low density lipoproteins (LDL), and high density lipoproteins (HDL). Lipoproteins are differentiated by how much triglyceride they contain such that the more triglyceride that is in these particles, the less dense they are and the more they “float”. Chylomicron contains the most triglyceride, followed by VLDL, LDL, and HDL."
-taken from a diabetes info group
So it is the density of lipoproteins that changes not the triglycerides- that was an unfortunate way to describe it. Still its a bad thing, please don't eat sugars.

Lynn Tramper
(retropump) - F

Locale: The Antipodes of La Coruna
Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Re: Shrinking triglycerides on 12/20/2009 19:11:31 MST Print View

To put it simply, fat is lighter than proteins and blood, so the more fat your lipoproteins have to carry, the lighter (less dense) they get. Insulin drives the conversion of sugar to triglycerides (fat), so higher insulin equals more low density and very low density stuff clogging up your arteries.

"bad thing, please don't eat sugars."

Good call!!

Elena Lee
(lenchik101) - F - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest (USA)
Re: Re: Lighten Your Heaviest Gear: You! on 12/22/2009 11:26:39 MST Print View

Brian, i sort of agree with your post that fats aren't necessarily bad for you. My great grandmother from Ukraine lived to 104 years old. She has survived two world wars, the fall of the two empires, and most importantly the hunger starvation in the 30s. When the doctor performed an autopsy on her, he said she didn't have a single internal decease except for a mini heart attack scar. We remember grandma fell sick one night when she was about 100. So grandma was the healthiest person i've ever known, what did she eat? Whole milk, lots of bread (natural, whole grain rye and wheat), all kinds of meat, especially pork, pork fat (salo), eggs, lots of potatoes, oils, other grain food. She always ate dinner as a two-course meal: soup, and main meal. When she became older and my mom cooked Borsch (Ukrainian soup), she often complained it wasn't very "fulfilling" (read not fat enough).

It seems to me that what's the most important is the holistic, natural way to eating. Whether it's vegetables, meat, milk, eggs or whatnot, the important part is to shop (or better, produce your own) natural ingredients, and cook from the scratch. This is also known as "shop in the perimeter of a supermarket" approach. If you know you might have inherited bad genetics (history of heart decease in the family or diabetes), of course stay away from too much fat and sugars, that's just common sense. As long as you eat natural, home cooked, un-processed food and treat dessert as something that happens rarely (once a week, at minimum), and also observe normal portions, you should be fine. The problem, especially for men, is it is hard to cook, especially for those with busy lives or coming from families where fast food approach was a way of life. In my culture, for instance, women cook all the food, and here in the US one needs to shop around for a woman with some cooking skills...

but the article was good, nevertheless, in pointing out some healthy foods out there.

Matt Holmes
(mholmes) - F

Locale: North Texas- Fort Worth
Lose the Weight on 12/27/2009 10:09:54 MST Print View

I think this is a great article, maybe not perfectly sceintific, but I don't think that was what the author was going for. Most likely a general education and food for thought.

I am new to the backpacking light community, but not to being outdoors. I do feel like I have found many kindred spirits on these websites and have learned a lot in just one week.

Prior to reading this article this morning, I found myself trying to figure out how to reduce the weight of my first aid kit by a couple ounces. In reality, maybe I should be a little more worried about the 15 pounds I want to get off my body. Which would make a bigger contribution to my overall performance and happiness? Heck taking 15 pounds off a body in simple terms means, you are carrying the same load with your pack!

After getting out of the Army, I found that weight seemed to find a home around my waist and after 18 months decided to get back to a normal size. My wife reminded me of a comment, putting on 20 pounds and running is like adding a bunch of pregnacy weight and exercising. NOT TRYING TO COMPARE THE TWO :).

I am almost at my weight loss goal and it has not been as hard as I would have thought. More importantly than the weight is the size of the belly.

After talking to my doctor during a routine physical, he recommended the Mediterranean Diet (no specific plan, just a eating lifestyle) which can be easily followed. Cut out most of the alcohol and start exercising again. It is a lot like the Zone Diet, but not as much measuring. There are 1,000's of receipes.

I have worked out with crossfit and would recommend it, but it is not for everyone. Just a simple all over body workout and some running is a good start.

Again, great article. I think it is a great way to start off a new year.

Edited by mholmes on 12/27/2009 10:25:35 MST.

John Donewar
(Newton) - MLife

Locale: Southeastern Louisiana
Re: enjoy getting out with my son. on 12/27/2009 15:04:04 MST Print View

Welcome to the community Matt!

I read your bio in your profile.

I spent many hours outdoors with my father hunting and fishing. I relish every memory of those moments now that he is gone.

I am sorry to say that I missed that oppotunity with my two boys. They are both young men out on their own and I invite them to go hiking with me whenever the opportunity presents itself. One of these days one or both of them will say yes and I will be a happy man.

Grab every minute outdoors with your son that you can. 24 hour overnite trips are great. Remember that everything doesn't have to go just right. Little mistakes and detours will give you both a lot to talk and laugh about back at home after the trip. It is my earnest hope for you that your son asks you often, "Dad, when can we go again?"

Sincerely,

Newton

Party On ! 2010

Edited by Newton on 12/27/2009 15:08:38 MST.

Reginald Donaldson
(worth) - MLife

Locale: Wind River Range
Hidden sugar. on 12/28/2009 21:23:25 MST Print View

I was one who did not pay much attention to diet and over time slowly packed on the pounds until I was diagnose with Type II diabetes. I was able to get my blood sugar under control with medication. Once controlled, I no longer felt famished all the time. Due to carbohydrate counting and exercise, I lost 45 pounds in less than 6 months and was able to reduce my medication dosage by 75% one year later.

These results gave me the motivation to join a gym and get off the medication. 3 months into the program and my blood sugar has dropped 15 points on average and I am beginning to see changes in my blood pressure.

Because I monitor my blood sugar routinely, I see the immediate effects of diet and exercise. I have been shocked and surprised at how much sugar is hidden in our foods. I have also learned that it takes a lot of hard work or exercise to burn through a modest size snack of 100 calories.

Ultimately, I hope to lose another 35 pounds, increase my muscle mass and lose the fat. In doing so, I hope that maybe I can slightly increased the amount of carbohydrates I can consume. Until then, I will consider the double cheese burger Happy Meal with a diet Coke a treat; and yes, it slightly exceeds my carbohydrate allotment for a meal.