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Chris Jones
(NightMarcher) - F
Replicating Nature Valley Granola Bars on 12/10/2009 17:14:08 MST Print View

I love Nature Valley Granola Bars. I could happily subsist on these things alone (http://naturevalley.com/Products.aspx#aCrunchyBar).

The thing is, I am not in the US so I have to purchase these as imports at almost 8 dollars a box (yikes!)

Does anyone have a good, tried-and-true recipe for granola bars so I can make these things at home? Even better if I can do so using healthier sweeteners as opposed to sugar, which is what the NV Granola bars use (2nd item in the ingredients list).

Thanks...

Edited by NightMarcher on 12/10/2009 17:30:12 MST.

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: Replicating Nature Valley Granola Bars on 12/10/2009 19:57:21 MST Print View

http://www.recipezaar.com/recipes.php?s_type=%2Frecipes.php&q=granola+bars&Search=Search&Searcht=

Look through these - you will find a couple winners with no issues :-)

Chris Jones
(NightMarcher) - F
RE: Replicating Nature Valley Granola Bars on 12/10/2009 23:45:13 MST Print View

Sarah,

Thanks for the link. Wow, that's quite a comprehensive list.

You have any favorites in there? This one looks promising: http://www.recipezaar.com/Decadent-ChocolatePbGranolaCoconut-Bars-82846

Jim Colten
(jcolten) - M

Locale: MN
storage?: Replicating Nature Valley Granola Bars on 12/11/2009 05:52:11 MST Print View

Sarah,

Would many of those recipes be usable for medium length hikes (like up to 4 weeks) if we do the following?
1) prepare
2) vacuum seal individual servings
3) freeze
4) within a day or two of leaving home: thaw, wait for external condensation to evaporate, pack for shipping and mail to resupply spots.

What should we look for in a recipe that would make it unsuitable for the above treatment?

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
Re: storage?: Replicating Nature Valley Granola Bars on 12/11/2009 08:46:45 MST Print View

That would work well..you could also wrap the bars in parchment paper before sealing as well. Now though...things to avoid: really soft dried fruit, heavy use of applesauce or pureed prunes (they don't keep well).
Oil helps preserve so that is a good thing! You can also overbake them a bit for a more dehydrated effect.

One thing about the original granola bars of the 70's were they were very crispy! If memory holds right some even had coconut oil...which is an excellent choice for preservation. It produces a snappy, not soft baked good.

Raisins work well for bars also. Mini chocolate chips as well.

Sarah Kirkconnell
(sarbar) - F

Locale: In the shadow of Mt. Rainier
RE: Replicating Nature Valley Granola Bars on 12/11/2009 08:48:01 MST Print View

Chris, that recipe looks fabulous!! I'd make those ;-)

Chris Jones
(NightMarcher) - F
Crispy Granola Bars on 12/13/2009 16:15:32 MST Print View

"One thing about the original granola bars of the 70's were they were very crispy!"

Those were the granola bars I grew up with! I always had a strong disdain for "chewy" treats. I especially hated rice crispy treats.

I noticed a lot of the recipes on that web site are for chewy granola bars. How do I make them crispy like the Nature Valley bars? Extra baking time? A second baking? Dehydrating? Alter the ingredients?

Thanks...

Tyler T
(tylernt) - F

Locale: Idaho
Honey on 12/13/2009 19:50:30 MST Print View

Honey is reportedly a good antibiotic, so it might be a good choice as the only sweetener. Dunno if baking will destroy the antibiotic properties though.

Jim Cook
(jim_cook)

Locale: Land of Cotton
Favorite Granola Bar Recipe on 12/13/2009 20:06:24 MST Print View

http://www.foodnetwork.com/recipes/alton-brown/granola-bars-recipe/index.html

Absolutely the best of all I've tried. I use some combination of dried sour cherries, cranberries or blueberries. I also substitute some of the oats with rolled wheat or rye.