Subscribe Contribute Advertise Facebook Twitter Instagram Forums Newsletter
drying a platypus?
Display Avatars Sort By:
Ian Rae
(iancrae) - F

Locale: North Cascades
drying a platypus? on 03/28/2006 21:39:36 MST Print View

Do you all dry out your platypus (dont know the plural of platypus...) between uses? Any good tricks? I've tried hanging them upside down for a week or so, and often that just doesnt get everything out. Do I need to worry about this? Is anything wierd going to grow in there? I live in western washington (olympia) so things take a LONG time to dry in the winter.

Edited by iancrae on 03/28/2006 21:40:08 MST.

Eric Noble
(ericnoble) - MLife

Locale: Colorado Rockies
Re: drying a platypus? on 03/28/2006 22:37:19 MST Print View

I keep mine in the freezer. That way I don't need to dry them and nothing is going to grow.

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: Re: drying a platypus? on 03/28/2006 23:19:51 MST Print View

Eric:

Have you never seen black stuff growing in freezers? Lots of bad stuff are impervious to freezing.

paul johnson
(pj) - F

Locale: LazyBoy in my Den - miss the forest
Re: Re: Re: drying a platypus? on 03/29/2006 01:17:26 MST Print View

Ben, I've never seen black stuff growing in freezers, but I betcha' it could. If you've seen it, that's good enough for me. Unlike heat, cold does NOT kill many microorganisms, including bacteria and molds. They either stop growing, or grow very, very, very slowly, or "blossom" when warmer conditions are encountered. That said, I also store my Platy in the freezer and haven't had problems. Have I had it there for 6mos straight? No. Would I be surprised if something was growing in it after many months stored in the freezer? No. Also, keep in mind that the freezer section of most modern Refrigerators are "frost free". Every 12hrs a defrost cycle initiates with a heater and warm air blown over it and it picks up more heat and then enters the freezer compartment to prevent frost build-up. This can raise the temp of the freezer section a bit. I'm having a senior moment and forgettin' the actual numbers (I think 0-10deg F normally up to maybe 32deg F or so at the peak of the defrost cycle - but, best check those numbers if you're curious). The defrost cycle definitely shortens frozen life of things stored in the frost-free freezer. It also is one contributing factor to "freezer burn".

Edited by pj on 03/29/2006 01:18:42 MST.

Jim Colten
(jcolten) - M

Locale: MN
Re: drying a platypus? on 03/29/2006 05:03:23 MST Print View

this works

Eric Noble
(ericnoble) - MLife

Locale: Colorado Rockies
Re: Re: Re: drying a platypus? on 03/29/2006 08:27:56 MST Print View

Ben, like Paul I haven't seen black stuff either, and if you've seen it, that's good enough for me as well. In hind sight, my post was a little too short. I agree that freezing would kill little if anything.

Most of the time my Platys have nothing but house water in then and are used 3 or 4 days a week. Cleaning them so frequently was a pain and they never had a chance to dry. I felt that being constantly wet provide a good environment to grow stuff. So now after an outing where there has been non-house water in them, or after about 2 weeks of house water use, I clean them with bleach. I haven't needed to dry them since I discovered the freezer trick, about 4 months ago in these forums. We have a good old freezer with frost that stays consistently cold, except of course when someone opens the door when its warm in the garage. I think freezing is better than the alternative for me. The biggest issue for me was that my wife would be annoyed seeing the Platys hanging around all the time. Now it's out of sight, out of mind.

EDIT-
Freezing does NOT replace the need to disinfect your Platys. Thanks Ben, for making me clarify this. It needed to be done.

Edited by ericnoble on 03/29/2006 09:25:41 MST.

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: drying a platypus? on 03/29/2006 11:30:27 MST Print View

Eric:

I like your caveat -- freezing in between, and then a good rinsing out ( or disinfecting from time to time) before use is certainly good enough.

Ian:

I think positioning the bladder upside down will actually slow the drying process! A slightly faster way is to position it upside down initially for a few hours (or overnight) to drain excess water, and then switch it rightside up to help the evaporative process along, until bladder is completely dry.

If you are truly in a hurry, then first position the bladder upside down to drain excess water. Next, straighten out a wire hanger and scotch tape pieces of cotton gauze to it. Bend the end portion slightly into a "J". Then insert the contraption into your bladder and swab the walls dry. The "J" will help reach the odd corners. Pressing down on the bladder helps with water absorbtion.

Scott Ashdown
(waterloggedwellies) - F

Locale: United Kingdom
Re: Re: drying a platypus? on 03/29/2006 12:39:18 MST Print View

I've never had any problems with my Platy. I will usually give it a good rinse before I depart on a trip and then fill it with clean tap water just before I leave. On the trail, I treat my water and then I clean it back at the end of the trip, fill it with water and leave some water purification tablets in their overnight if I had used it for non tap water at any stage. I then just empty it, give it a good shake and leave it on the draining board on its side. It always seems to dry out okay. Haven't noticed anything growing in there. I don't think I would do the freezer thing as I can't see that doing anything really helpful other than delaying the need to have to clean it properly.
However, the posting has got me worrying about something I didn't really give that much thought to, leave it on the draining board and forget!!!

Ben 2 World
(ben2world) - MLife

Locale: So Cal
Re: drying a platypus? on 03/29/2006 13:02:51 MST Print View

The complaint is only about the long drying time required.

You are doing all the right things, and if drying time is not an issue for you (maybe you live in a dryer area), then you are fine.

Eric Noble
(ericnoble) - MLife

Locale: Colorado Rockies
Re: Re: Re: drying a platypus? on 03/29/2006 14:02:12 MST Print View

Scott,
I live in Colorado which is generally dry. The problem that freezing solved for me was that I was using my Platys so frequently that they never dried, and did start to turn greenish. It's a lazy solution which makes me like it even more. You are right, it is about spending less time cleaning. If yours dry completely between uses then you have less of a problem. Though I assume the edges and corners stay wet longer than we realize.

Edited by ericnoble on 03/29/2006 14:06:40 MST.

Scott Ashdown
(waterloggedwellies) - F

Locale: United Kingdom
Drying a platypus? on 03/29/2006 14:58:49 MST Print View

Thanks Benjamin & Eric for the comments. My house is pretty warm, central heating etc, so the Platy dries out pretty quickly along with clothes, bowls and all the other type of stuff. When not in use, its stored in my attic which is insulated and again pretty warm. However, any sign of pond scum green colour in my bottle will have me reaching for the bleech in double quick time!!!!

Platypus do make a Platy version with a resealable base. Their sales pitch suggests that its ideal for putting ice cubes in the Platy, sealing it, filling with liquid as usual and then using the normal spout to dispense. I suppose its really aimed at day trips, that type of thing but I guess if I get really paranoid, I could use one so that I could get a clean tea towel inside and dry it that way!!!!

Edited by waterloggedwellies on 03/29/2006 14:59:54 MST.

Ian Rae
(iancrae) - F

Locale: North Cascades
thanks for all the replies on 03/29/2006 20:09:37 MST Print View

These are all good insights... I think that I'll try hanging them upside down overnite and then hang right side up. Seems like they do dry eventually (although in the winter, I often go out once a week and they dont always totally dry) and I'll bleach occasionally before use.

Peter McDonough
(crazypete) - F

Locale: Above the Divided Line
How to Dry on 03/29/2006 20:51:00 MST Print View

Don't bother hanging them upside down, because water vapor rises is is trapped inside. Just rinse it out, or if you are really worried drop in a denture cleaner or some bleach, then shake it out and then blow it up and then set it upright to dry. Mold can't grow if its dry.

Mike Storesund
(mikes) - F
Re: drying a platypus? on 03/31/2006 12:48:04 MST Print View

Like Peter mentioned… bleach
At the end of my use I rinse my platy out then put in 2 drops of bleach from my micro dropper bottle and VERY HOT water; put on the lid; shake it up to coat the entire inside; loosen the lid and start to pour out, getting the threads; remove the lid and pour out the rest.
I stand it up with the opening on top. The very hot water helps expedite the drying time. I have on occasions used a wire clothes hanger by putting a few ‘S’ bends in it to keep the sides from touching and insert up the opening and let the bag hang upside down.

Dale Wambaugh
(dwambaugh) - MLife

Locale: Pacific Northwest
Re: drying a platypus? on 03/31/2006 13:10:50 MST Print View

"Do you all dry out your platypus (dont know the plural of platypus...) between uses?"

[Australian accent] We skin 'em and dry 'em fur side up, Mate. And that's platy-pi :)


I rinse mine and hang from one corner to let the majority drain and then flip it neck-up to get the last bits. It takes a while. I have a big ground wire running over the sink in my basement laundry area and they can hang there by a clothes pin until I remember to do something with them or need them again.

I would try a dilute solution of Aqua Mira to kill any bugs. A few drops of bleach diluted well would be cheap and easy too.

Mike Storesund
(mikes) - F
Re: Re: drying a platypus? on 03/31/2006 23:40:23 MST Print View

>>"[Australian accent] We skin 'em and dry 'em fur side up, Mate. And that's platy-pi :)"<<

ROFLMAO