back packs
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adam peterson
(Pacbacker) - F

Locale: The Pacfic Northwest
back packs on 12/01/2009 18:31:31 MST Print View

does anyone have any information about how far the shoulder straps should be mounted about the hip belt based on ones back measurement?

Chris Collins
(hobbitling) - F
Re: back packs (strap attachment measurements) on 12/02/2009 07:48:19 MST Print View

I usually base those sorts of measurements on a pack that I know fits well.

Usually I have the shoulder straps attach at the hip belt (if you're making one) and the the top attachment is about level with my armpit, maybe a bit higher, at the thickest part of my shoulders/chest, behind my collarbone. Does that make sense?

Lucas Boyer
(jhawkwx) - MLife

Locale: 38.97˚N, 95.26˚W
re: straps on 12/02/2009 07:57:34 MST Print View

Ditto on using old pack for template.

If you don't have an old pack: Measure your torso(illiac crest to vertebrae at base of neck(forgot #?)). From there I would reverse engineer based on the straps attaching 2 to 3 inches below tops of shoulders. REI has a diagram for proper pack fit that gives these numbers. As for hipbelts, the models I'm looking at put the hipbelt on at the base of the pack and then attach the shoulder strap at the base of the hipbelt inside the vertical seam where the hipbelt attaches to the pack. Another bar tack on the top of the hipbelt wing where the shoulder strap passes provides another anchor. Look at the free G4 plans on Gossamer Gear's site, you can also look at the Lab Pack at Thru-Hiker. Good luck.

Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Re: re: straps on 12/02/2009 09:37:34 MST Print View

i use my torso as the length from the bottom of the hipbelt (1" above bottom of my pack)to where the shoulder straps attach (at the top). Some like the straps a little lower and some a little higher. I like even.

-Tim

adam peterson
(Pacbacker) - F

Locale: The Pacfic Northwest
back packs on 12/02/2009 23:24:36 MST Print View

thanks everyone, all good ideas. i guess one of the nice things about making your own gear is you can experiment. just looking for some general guide lines. i can seem to find a pack that fits really well. so i gonna try and make one.

adam peterson
(Pacbacker) - F

Locale: The Pacfic Northwest
back packs on 12/02/2009 23:29:25 MST Print View

hey tim, if you have them level does that eleminate the need for load levers? i typically end up with a load in the high twenties but as high as 45.

Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Re: back packs on 12/02/2009 23:54:01 MST Print View

don't make a frameless pack for 45#.

I haven't used load lifters, but it seems to me all personal preference. Having the straps even doesn't change much, some like them below the shoulders and some above, doesn't affect the need/or lack of need for lifters. Make it with lifters if you think you might want them as it is easy to remove stuff but more time consuming to add it.


-Tim

adam peterson
(Pacbacker) - F

Locale: The Pacfic Northwest
back packs on 12/03/2009 00:04:40 MST Print View

i have a couple of ideas for a light frame. you ever built a pack with a frame? its the glacier gear and what not that adds up. thats one of the reasons im looking at making a lighter pack for starters.my current pack weights almost 7lbs

Chris Collins
(hobbitling) - F
Re: Back Packs on 12/03/2009 07:53:17 MST Print View

I salvaged the framesheet from another pack and used it in one of mine. It seemed like 1 or 2 mm thick Polyethylene or something. Thinner than I expected. But I've never made one from scratch.

You could probably get some thin plastic from an old rubbermade storage bin or laundry basket or whatever. A trip to the dollar store or big box store might be a good idea. And it's probably cheaper than ordering a piece and having it shipped.

Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Re: Re: Back Packs on 12/03/2009 08:37:26 MST Print View

I haven't made a frame pack but if i did i would start by making a frameless pack that had the ability to hold a wide plastic frame sheet and 2 vertical stays. Then you can experiment with different materials to find ones that you like. (if i were using stays i'd also use a pad against my back.

Roger C's frame looks promising, but construction seems difficult.

I have seen others using that corrugated plastic sheeting (looks like plastic cardboard).

-Tim

adam peterson
(Pacbacker) - F

Locale: The Pacfic Northwest
Back packs on 12/03/2009 09:48:17 MST Print View

So you have link to his site? I was thinking along the same
line, using a inverted u shape. I have also see the corrugated plastic used with some sort of rod slipped inside the corrihations as stays and to allow for some shaping of the sheet.

adam peterson
(Pacbacker) - F

Locale: The Pacfic Northwest
Back packs on 12/03/2009 11:15:35 MST Print View

Gotta love the combination of spell check and typing on my phone

Tim Marshall
(MarshLaw303) - MLife

Locale: Minnesota
Re: Back packs on 12/03/2009 12:52:06 MST Print View

bushawalking or something like that is his site. Check his profile.

-Tim

Roger Caffin
(rcaffin) - BPL Staff - MLife

Locale: Wollemi & Kosciusko NPs, Europe
Re: Back packs on 12/03/2009 13:59:56 MST Print View

> So you have link to his site? I

www.bushwalking.org.au/FAQ/

Cheers