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Pete Gillander
(moresnowdays) - F
Getting ready to snowshoe in the ADK on 11/11/2009 19:27:57 MST Print View

Trying to get set up with the basics for what ever I might run into hiking/snowshoeing in the Adirondacks this winter. Might include some climbing as well, but nothing overly extreme.

At this point I have my Tubbs Odyssy 30's. Last year I didn't get out as much, but did find some ice was a problem climbing and especially descending with the cleats on the snowshoes, so I've added some traction.

I recently got Scarpa Barun GTX boots, Grivel Air Tech (the steel version) crampons for the tough spots, and some micor spikes for the potentially slippery area that don't require snowshoes.

Does this seem like a good combination of Snowshoes, boot, crampons, and micro-spikes for winter hiking?

Edited by moresnowdays on 11/11/2009 19:29:24 MST.

Spruce Goose
(SpruceGoose) - F

Locale: New England
Re: Getting ready to snowshoe in the ADK on 11/11/2009 19:53:15 MST Print View

The Scarpas aren't insulated. They are also hard-soled. I prefer an insulated, softer-soled "boot" for snowshoeing personally...but you can certainly make these work.

If you're talking about navigating the High Peaks, the snowshoes are probably bigger than you need, particularly on packed trails...but if you're not gonna be in the High Peaks, you're more likely to be dealing with unbroken trail, so that might be right for you, depending on your body and pack weight.

Crampons and Microspikes are perfect.

Pete Gillander
(moresnowdays) - F
Non-insulated Scarpa Barun for snowshoeing. on 11/12/2009 04:26:33 MST Print View

I was a little concerned about the Scarpa Barun being warm enough, but it does have a Gortex lining. I'm hoping that help keep them dry, and they'll be good with a warm sock.

I did quiet abit of reading around on the crampons before I picked the Grivel's Air Tech. Which also led me to the Scarpa boots. From what I found on boot/crampon compatibility, the usual winter boots that I had used before are to considered flexible to work with the crampon.

My use may be rather moderate with the crampon, but I didn't want to allow the crampons to get me half way up some steap icey patch only to have issues with the boot holding on to the crampon half way into it. Not sure how big of an issue this really is, as I've never used crampons before, but after reading I didn't want to find out the hard way:)

I wanted the ability to do some of the peaks this year, but I spend most of the time breaking my on trail in lower, deeper areas.

Spruce Goose
(SpruceGoose) - F

Locale: New England
Re: Non-insulated Scarpa Barun for snowshoeing. on 11/12/2009 08:48:22 MST Print View

>...the Scarpa Barun...does have a Gortex lining. I'm hoping that help keep them dry, and they'll be good with a warm sock.<<

They'll probably wet out if you're out for more than a few hours in 30 F weather, but with the right layering under them, you should be OK.

>>From what I found on boot/crampon compatibility, the usual winter boots that I had used before are to considered flexible to work with the crampon.<<

You're right. This is why I prefer the Kahtoola KTS and/or the CAMP Stalker. They have more flexible bars, that allow for use of more flexible footwear. But for kicking steps and/or front pointing, you can't beat the stiffer setup. Everything's a compromise.

John Brochu
(JohnnyBgood4) - F

Locale: New Hampshire
"Getting ready to snowshoe in the ADK" on 11/12/2009 09:33:29 MST Print View

Is it common to carry both crampons and microspikes?

Personally, if I am carrying crampons I would just wear them on any terrain where microspikes might be necessary.

Dave .
(Ramapo) - F
Getting ready to snowshoe in the ADK on 11/12/2009 09:33:56 MST Print View

When I snowshoe in the Adirondacks I use th following:

Boots: Keen Growlers
Snowshoes: Atlas 12 Series (30")
Crampons: Petzl Vasak (strap)

Boots and snowshoes have been working great for me. So have the crampons, but they're probably a bit overkill. If I had it to do over again I'd get the Black Diamond Contact crampons, or (maybe) the Kahtoolas.

Hope that helps a little.

Pete Gillander
(moresnowdays) - F
Boot for snowshoeing on 11/12/2009 09:54:29 MST Print View

I think I will be happy with the Scarpa Barun GTX, but I recently read about Salomon B-52 boots. Maybe if I need I might use the Scarpas for general hiking, and get something like the Salomon B-52 for longer, or warmer, snowshoeing.

Can anyone comment on the B-52 being stiff in the sole at all? Or other comments on them?

I also just read that the Grivel Air Tech crampons can have the semi-rigid strap replaced with an optional more flexible one for more flexible boots. Any thoughts on this? The crampon is listed as Semi-rigid, so not sure if that's because it allready has the more flexible link, or if the optional one is more flexible?

Michael B
(mbenvenuto) - F

Locale: Vermont
snowshoes in the ADK on 11/12/2009 09:56:13 MST Print View

Snowshoes or skis are required when there is 8 or more inches of snow in the high peaks. I don't get over there much, but my understanding is that they are required on your feet, even when the trail is packed down (there will be 8 inches or more "on the ground" pretty much all winter). And that they enforce this rule pretty strictly. So microspikes, as great as they are, have limited use in the ADKs since they are really ideal for packed trail.

I think you can use crampons above treeline on ice (and least I think people do that), but for the most part you will be wearing the snowshoes all most all the time. So shoes that are lightish and aggressively spiked (MSR most likely in one form) are maybe the best choice. Here is the thread that I was remembering from a year or two ago:

http://adkforum.com/showthread.php?t=8855

I think you will want insulated boots too. The Daks are very cold; the approaches can be long and the hikes are hard; so you will be out all day for most trips.

But otherwise they are a great and very beautiful place.

Edited by mbenvenuto on 11/12/2009 10:12:52 MST.

Pete Gillander
(moresnowdays) - F
Which insulated boot, snowpant and gaitor? on 11/12/2009 11:54:27 MST Print View

Is there are paticular insulated boot recommended, or popular, for snowshoeing in the ADK? I used to wear some large snow pants over my old winter boot, which were Sorels I think. I picture this set up being potentialy dangerous to myself and the snowpants with crampons.

I would think it would be best to use gaitors to keep snow out and pant cuffs clear from crampons. However, I don't think my somewhat baggy snowpants would fit well under gaitors. What do others use?

Spruce Goose
(SpruceGoose) - F

Locale: New England
Re: Which insulated boot, snowpant and gaitor? on 11/12/2009 13:04:40 MST Print View

Those B-52's are good. I've got a couple friends that use them. Might be better to post this particular question in the G Spot forum. Probably get a better variety of answers. There are tons of "boots" that would work well. I've been using TNF Storm Peaks, and I know at least one other guy on this forum that also does. Note though, that I have 4 different pairs of winter footwear, depending in conditions, etc. Like I said, everything is a compromise.

For pants, most people are using softshell pants lately. Again, there are tons of decent options. Gaitors are a good idea, especially with crampons...if only to protect the pants.

Pete Gillander
(moresnowdays) - F
Salomon B 52 on 11/12/2009 19:00:08 MST Print View

Thanks for the replies. Was curious, did a search for the Salomon B 52, found there were a couple versions of these I think. Are yours the GTX?

Spruce Goose
(SpruceGoose) - F

Locale: New England
Re: Getting ready to snowshoe in the ADK on 11/13/2009 09:32:19 MST Print View

>>Is it common to carry both crampons and microspikes? Personally, if I am carrying crampons I would just wear them on any terrain where microspikes might be necessary.<<

I can run in Microspikes (safely). So I tend to carry the extra 12 oz for stuff where I'm gonna have a lot of (relatively) flat, above-tree line stuff. Northeast examples would include Presidential Range traverses, Katahdin, Marcy...stuff like that.

>>Are yours the GTX [B52's]?<<

I don't actually have the B-52's, and I'm not sure what my friends are running.

Scott Ireland
(WinterWarlock) - MLife

Locale: Western NY
ADK's on 11/17/2009 20:59:53 MST Print View

Hi Pete -

Your setup sounds pretty much OK...I spend most of my winter hikes in the ADK's myself. Depending on your size, you may find the 30" snowshoes a bit long for some of the trail-less peaks, since the paths are pretty tight.

Many people do carry MicroSpikes, crampons and snowshoes since the conditions vary widely depending on the mountain, specific trail and weather.

As for the thread on ADKForum describing the ticketing for not wearing snowshoes, it is required to wear them with 8" of snow or more, but in most cases the Rangers will simply talk to you about it. As a moderator on that forum, I can say that the individual involved provoked the Ranger by mouthing off during the incident, which likely led to the ticket more than not wearing snowshoes.

If you are an ADK hiker, I'd recommend joining ADK Forum, or better yet, it's sister forum ADKHighPeaks - lots of folks there with lots of experience - also means lots of potential hiking partners over there. Tell them WinterWarlock sent you!