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Matt Eckhart
(matte580) - F - M
test on 03/19/2006 17:05:40 MST Print View

There were a few things I was looking for as far as a shelter is concerned. 
You probably aren't as picky as me but if I was going to spend the money, I
wanted my picky needs to be fulfilled.   I wanted a tent and not a
bivy because a vestibule is important to me.  I like being able to cook
under it when needed and have a place to put my pack and shoes.  The all
mesh tent body is great in nice weather when you don't want to get eaten up by
the bugs. I wanted a double walled tent so I would have more ventilation options
and so condensation isn't a problem.  The bathtub floor and steep slope of
the rainfly keeps me and my down bag dry in wet conditions.



The weight is 2 lbs 6 oz which is a little heavier then some bivy's but I get a
lot more flexibility with this tent.  In winter I drop more weight using
the fast fly setup making it weigh 1 lb 12oz.



There are a few things that could be improved:



  • A few inches longer would be nice to fit long sleeping bags since my
    marmot hydrogen bag fits a person up to 6'6.  I'm 6'3 and I just fit in
    this tent.   I don't understand why backpacks are offered in short,
    medium, and long torsos; sleeping bags have regular and long lengths, but as
    far as tents you get one size.

  • The pole setup is a modified A frame.  The best way I can explain it
    is sort of like a tri-pod with a longer leg extending the length of the tent
    body.  The poles are connected to a hub where they meet at.  There
    are two short poles that meet on top of the door and then a long center pole
    going down the length of the tent. The main thing I don't like is that there
    is sewn loops in the tent body for the long pole, and clips for the 2 short
    poles.  I wish there were all clips so during rain I could setup the tent
    using the fast fly option and then clip the tent up to the poles inside the
    rain fly.  Instead I have to thread the pole through the sewn loops
    getting the tent wet, then I'm finally able to drape the rain fly over. 

  • Also you have to be careful with Velcro since the tent body is all mesh
    (except the floor of course). The little hooks on Velcro can grab a hold of
    that mesh pretty easy.



</body>

Matt Eckhart
(matte580) - F - M
Re: test on 03/19/2006 17:07:35 MST Print View

There were a few things I was looking for as far as a shelter is concerned. 
You probably aren't as picky as me but if I was going to spend the money, I
wanted my picky needs to be fulfilled.   I wanted a tent and not a
bivy because a vestibule is important to me.  I like being able to cook
under it when needed and have a place to put my pack and shoes.  The all
mesh tent body is great in nice weather when you don't want to get eaten up by
the bugs. I wanted a double walled tent so I would have more ventilation options
and so condensation isn't a problem.  The bathtub floor and steep slope of
the rainfly keeps me and my down bag dry in wet conditions.
The weight is 2 lbs 6 oz which is a little heavier then some bivy's but I get a
lot more flexibility with this tent.  In winter I drop more weight using
the fast fly setup making it weigh 1 lb 12oz.
There are a few things that could be improved:


  • A few inches longer would be nice to fit long sleeping bags since my
    marmot hydrogen bag fits a person up to 6'6.  I'm 6'3 and I just fit in
    this tent.   I don't understand why backpacks are offered in short,
    medium, and long torsos; sleeping bags have regular and long lengths, but as
    far as tents you get one size.

  • The pole setup is a modified A frame.  The best way I can explain it
    is sort of like a tri-pod with a longer leg extending the length of the tent
    body.  The poles are connected to a hub where they meet at.  There
    are two short poles that meet on top of the door and then a long center pole
    going down the length of the tent. The main thing I don't like is that there
    is sewn loops in the tent body for the long pole, and clips for the 2 short
    poles.  I wish there were all clips so during rain I could setup the tent
    using the fast fly option and then clip the tent up to the poles inside the
    rain fly.  Instead I have to thread the pole through the sewn loops
    getting the tent wet, then I'm finally able to drape the rain fly over. 

  • Also you have to be careful with Velcro since the tent body is all mesh
    (except the floor of course). The little hooks on Velcro can grab a hold of
    that mesh pretty easy.