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Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: micro-tensioners and nano-guyline on 11/03/2009 11:45:21 MST Print View

JacksRBetter has these, if this is what you're looking for. And they're on sale!

http://www.jacksrbetter.com/STLs.htm

There was also a thread elsewhere on making your own. Got the URL at home, I'll send it to you tonight.

Dave U
(FamilyGuy) - F

Locale: Rockies
Gatewood Cape Setup on 11/03/2009 11:46:35 MST Print View

"And they said I was too old to learn....."

I think they were right....

John Brochu
(JohnnyBgood4) - F

Locale: New Hampshire
re: "Gatewood Cape Setup" on 11/03/2009 11:49:20 MST Print View

I got some here...

http://www.ultralightdesigns.com/products/shelter/microLoc.html

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: re: "Gatewood Cape Setup" on 11/03/2009 11:53:07 MST Print View

"http://www.ultralightdesigns.com/products/shelter/microLoc.html"

Ah, Tom, if this is what you're looking for, I've got some I can send you, no charge. Came from MLD, but I bought more than I needed. Just let me know and I'll throw them in an envelope.

Edited by idester on 11/03/2009 11:53:38 MST.

Kevin Babione
(KBabione) - MLife

Locale: Pennsylvania
Re: micro-tensioners and nano-guyline on 11/03/2009 11:56:09 MST Print View

Ron at Mountain Laurel Designs offers something that looks very similar to the BPL nano setup - Look under shelters at MountainLaurelDesigns.com.

I don't think it's quite as light as the nano cord, but the tensioners look to be about the same so the cord can't be much heavier - especially for the line quantity you'd need.

Thomas Burns
(nerdboy52) - MLife

Locale: "Alas, poor Yogi.I knew him well."
Gatewood tensioners on 11/03/2009 11:58:14 MST Print View

Like these:

Tensioner

Ya'll know them. They're used on many tarptents.

Stargazer

Thomas Burns
(nerdboy52) - MLife

Locale: "Alas, poor Yogi.I knew him well."
Tensioners on 11/03/2009 12:06:14 MST Print View

>Ah, Tom, if this is what you're looking for, I've got some I can send you, no charge. Came from MLD, but I bought more than I needed. Just let me know and I'll throw them in an envelope.

Thems the ones, John and Doug. Thanks. Doug, you are a true mensch, and I don't say that about everybody. Send them along, and i will be forever in your debt.

Stargazer

Eric Blumensaadt
(Danepacker) - MLife

Locale: Mojave Desert
U.S. Army "Gatewood Cape" on 11/03/2009 12:17:29 MST Print View

About 10 years ago the U.S. Army had a newly developed poncho/tent that gave more shelter than the Gatewood Cape. I'm sure it was also of heavier material, being a mil-spec item. But it appears they dropped the idea because I haven't seen it recently.

The point is that it had a very clever design which could be copied with lighter marterial. In fact I beleive that it could easily be linked to another poncho/tent for an even better shelter for two.

Anyone remember anything about this?

On another related note I see the Hilleberg triangular line tensioners pictured in this thread. They are fine but I feel the small tensioners on TarpTents are even better for holding lines. Also on this topic, since the Gatewood Cape is designed to be a poncho I'm assuming that the tie-outs SHOULD be attatched to the Cape via small plastic snap hooks for quick set-up and breaking camp so you''re not walking in the rain trailing tieouts. No?

Eric
BTW, as both a Contrail & Moment owner I have to agree with "Caveman" Thomas that there is usually a light weight/convienance tradeoff. I chose the Moment and sold my Contrail, gaining 4 oz. but greater wind stability and even faster setup.

Edited by Danepacker on 11/03/2009 12:37:03 MST.

Tim Heckel
(ThinAir) - M

Locale: 6237' - Manitou Springs
Second pole on 11/03/2009 12:25:32 MST Print View

Here is an exerpt from an old review. I never quite figured out what the poster was trying to convey?

"I followed the instructions to set up the Cape the first time using one trekking pole set at 45 inches,
which creates a rectangular shelter with a low front beak, adequate headroom only at the center,
and a flat-sloped backside that limited interior usable space.

The Cape pitches more to my liking using a 50-inch long trekking pole at the center and a second trekking pole
to extend the beak. The resulting shelter has much better headroom, more usable interior space,
and a large sheltered area under the beak. My modifications require a 30-inch extension to the front guyline."

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: U.S. Army "Gatewood Cape" on 11/03/2009 12:31:53 MST Print View

More than 10 years ago! I was issued one when I joined the Army in 1980. Used it extensively! A nice liner tied into it as well. I use to use it as a lightweight 'quilt' during exercises. Issued a rubber-feeling blowup sleeping mat as well. Heavy sucker (the mat, the poncho and liner were actually not all that heavy for the time). I remember one particular night in Sudan, after jumping in (I was in the 82nd at the time), sticking to that mat it was so hot and humid. Had the liner, without the poncho, draped over me, and it was still too hot! Ah, the memories.

Keith Selbo
(herman666) - F - M

Locale: Northern Virginia
Re: micro-tensioners and nano-guyline on 11/03/2009 12:48:07 MST Print View

"Sadly, BPL doesn't stock the tensioner/ guyline combo anymore. Does anybody have any ideas about another source?"

Here's the best tensioner source I know: TAUT LINE HITCH
You can't lose it, forget it, pay for it, or break it and it's weightless.

With just three turns around the rope in the same direction, it's simple and fast to tie, and it adjusts as easily as the tensioners you pay for. I've used it for years.

Edited by herman666 on 11/09/2009 12:13:57 MST.

Thomas Burns
(nerdboy52) - MLife

Locale: "Alas, poor Yogi.I knew him well."
Taut lines on 11/03/2009 13:11:51 MST Print View

>Here's the best tensioner source I know: TAUT LINE HITCH
You can't lose it, forget it, pay for it, or break it and it's weightless.

Gotta agree with you, mate. I'll try the TAUT LINE HITCH .

However, I must say,at 3 AM with that high-humidity sag, internal condensation issues, and more-than-slight-sleep-deprivation confusion, it surely is nice to grab that line tensioner and give the guyline a quick tug to get the wet tarp off your face. Ain't modern technology wunnerful. :-)

Stargazer

Edited by nerdboy52 on 11/03/2009 13:33:29 MST.

Keith Selbo
(herman666) - F - M

Locale: Northern Virginia
Re: Taut lines on 11/03/2009 13:35:39 MST Print View

"it surely is nice to grab that line tensioner and give the guyline a quick tug to get the wet tarp off your face."


... but you can do that with a taut line hitch too!

Edited by herman666 on 11/09/2009 12:16:04 MST.

Thomas Burns
(nerdboy52) - MLife

Locale: "Alas, poor Yogi.I knew him well."
Thanks! I'll try it. on 11/03/2009 13:42:09 MST Print View

>... but you can do that with a taut line hitch too!

Gotcha. I'm more than a bit dyslexic, especially when it comes to knots, but I'll give it a go. I never could get the Boy Scout knot badge, but it's time I gave it another try. :-)

Stargazer

Doug I.
(idester) - MLife

Locale: MidAtlantic
Re: Thanks! I'll try it. on 11/03/2009 14:05:21 MST Print View

If you have an iPhone/iPod Touch, there's this great program that shows you how to tie all kinds of knots. And it just happens to have the Tautline Hitch! Since I carry my iPhone with me while backpacking, I always have this handy reference with me! It's called ProKnot (I have no affiliation with the company or Apple, just a satisified pseudo geek).

Franco Darioli
(Franco) - M

Locale: Melbourne
Gatewood Cape Setup on 11/03/2009 14:50:41 MST Print View

BTW some of the thinner guylines don't grip well with the Tautline Hitch. The same for the type supplied by Tarptent .
The MLD type does.

Edited by Franco on 11/03/2009 15:31:52 MST.

Frank Deland
(rambler) - M

Locale: On the AT in VA
gatewood/Wild Oasis on 11/03/2009 15:56:59 MST Print View

Stake out the four corners first then the front and back. Figure out where your sleeping bag is going to go. Place the pole at the edge of the middle of your bag. So stick the pole in the harness then work on setting up the corners, then front and back.

http://outdoors.webshots.com/album/571720316aNJADA



Since, I am not a poncho fan, I switched to the Wild Oasis.wild oasis

MYOG line tensioners with elastic tubing explained in the Archives somewhere!

Edited by rambler on 11/03/2009 16:02:19 MST.

Linda Vassallo
(eastbayhiker)

Locale: Eastbay
Re: Gatewood Cape Setup on 11/03/2009 16:33:33 MST Print View

Hi Thomas, I received my Gatewood Cape this past summer and used it for two trips. I tried several methods of set-up before deciding on my current method. In the beginning it seemed either the back or the front of the shelter was too "flappy" when I set the shelter up from front-to-back or back-to-front. So now I go from the sides-to-front-to-back.

On both trips it was very windy so to set it up I learned to temporarily set the two side points (closest to the front), then place my trekking pole and set the front guy line where I want it. I then set the back point. From there I re-adjust the two side/back points taught and reset the front points taught.

As a side note: I keep the harness and extension lines on. They do not seem to interfere with wearing/hiking. I zip the harness guy line into the pocket and secure the extra cape length with the two inside snaps. I set the Cape up to wear as rain gear before packing up for the day so it is ready to get into should I need it.

I usually set the shelter up utilizing the extensions but will hunker the sides down to the ground if necessary, bypassing the attached extensions.

John B and Kevin B: I like your idea of using the second pole to guy out the side. I will try it next time I'm out. I did feel I needed a little more room at the head end sometimes. Thanks for the tip.

Shelter set up
Side view

LV

Alexander Laws
(goldenmeanie) - F

Locale: Los Angeles
Cape on 11/03/2009 17:44:26 MST Print View

Stop with the pictures! You are making me want to buy this poncho ;)

Linda, I dig the pack!

Linda Vassallo
(eastbayhiker)

Locale: Eastbay
Re: Cape on 11/03/2009 19:43:43 MST Print View

I was saving this story for another post but here goes.

The Gatewood Cape and ZPack saved me from what would have been a very wet, cold, miserable night at Mt Whitney. My hiking companions (Tony and Cameron) and I set up early about the time a storm began to descend upon us. The storm lasted 12 hours or so and in the middle of the night I awoke to the awareness that I was surrounded/lying in a pool of water. My NeoAir pad was high enough to keep me (for the moment) out of the water. I called out to Tony and Cameron to apprise them of the developing situation then shimmied out of my mummy bag, stuffing it and the rest of my gear into the ZPack, and prepared to move my Cape shelter to higher ground. I noticed at the time that while the pack bottom had been submersed in the water it was dry inside. Even more surprising to me, the optional silnylon pockets on the outside of the pack kept my camera completely dry.

I took my trekking pole out of the Cape hood and pulled up stakes. Meanwhile Tony found me another site while I threw my sleep pad and pack into Cameron's tent. Once relocated to the new site I put my pole back into the hood and Tony and Cameron quickly staked the sides of the Cape out. I retreived my gear from Cameron's tent and was shortly back inside my mummy. It took very little time to complete this move and I was amazed at how easy it all was. Thanks to Tony and Cameron for their help in quickly setting up again.

The storm seemed to gather strength as the night wore on. Continuous high winds punctuated by strong gusts pounded the shelter. I just knew the Cape would be damaged or worse ripped from it's stakes to be blown down the mountain.

But, none of that happened......in the morning I assessed for damages....I found none! The Cape withstood the storm and more. I stayed dry, my gear in my pack stayed dry. Best two pieces of gear I own!

Tony and Cameron were not immune to the effects of that night's force but I leave it for them to tell their tale.

I highly recommend the Gatewood Cape. Light weight, waterproof, easy to set up (after the learning curve). It is far stronger than I originally thought it would be. I'm 5'6" and it is a great size as a one person shelter for me. As rain gear it falls to just below my knees when the sides are gathered and secured with the inside snaps.

The ZPack more than performed for me on that trip. Light weight, strong, waterproof, perfect. It shed the rain and mud, looking clean the next day. It required only a damp cloth to dust it off after trips.

Sorry for the long wind-I've been dying to sermonize their virtues since returning. Finally had the excuse and time to do so.

Cheers
LV