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Ultralight Rifle
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David Olsen
(oware)

Locale: Steptoe Butte
Ultralight Rifle on 10/07/2009 18:39:08 MDT Print View

First one I've seen at 16 ounces.

Use it as a fishing rod too.

http://pakrifle.com/Pak-Rifle.html

Edited by oware on 10/07/2009 18:40:14 MDT.

Chris W
(simplespirit) - MLife

Locale: .
Re: Ultralight Rifle on 10/07/2009 18:43:01 MDT Print View

Looks like what Ryan has been playing with.

Edited by simplespirit on 10/07/2009 18:44:26 MDT.

Craig W.
(xnomanx) - F - M
Re: Re: Ultralight Rifle on 10/07/2009 19:16:11 MDT Print View

"Whoa! There's a deranged guy down by the stream swinging a rifle back and forth!"

Perhaps a good way to get shot by local LE while fishing?

Mike M
(mtwarden) - MLife

Locale: Montana
interesting on 10/07/2009 19:30:48 MDT Print View

interesting piece, be curious how reliable it is

Dean F.
(acrosome) - MLife

Locale: Back in the Front Range
What is it for? on 10/07/2009 20:26:28 MDT Print View

I dunno- It looks pretty useless to me. I am forced to ask what purpose for which one typically takes a rifle into the backcountry for which it would be any good. I don't think it would be good for any. It looks like a cheap "plinker", like the AR-7 or something.

Unless you plan to use it as an actual "survival" rifle. If so, I would propose that unless you are planning incredibly remote hikes in, say, Alaksa or the Yukon or something, it won't contribute much to your survival. (And a shotgun would be a more appropriate multi-use firearm.) Really, in any survival situation in which a hiker is likely to find himself, keeping himself fed is not topping the priorities list.

I suppose that you could plan to supplement your food by hunting squirrels in the same way that some folk pack a fly-fishing rod and plan on catching trout. Maybe. Good luck.

Am I missing something?

Edited by acrosome on 10/07/2009 20:28:50 MDT.

John S.
(jshann) - F
Re: What is it for? on 10/07/2009 20:44:02 MDT Print View

and overpriced too.

Sanad Toukhly
(Red_Fox) - MLife

Locale: South Florida
Re: What is it for? on 10/07/2009 22:16:15 MDT Print View

"Unless you plan to use it as an actual "survival" rifle. If so, I would propose that unless you are planning incredibly remote hikes in, say, Alaksa or the Yukon or something, it won't contribute much to your survival. (And a shotgun would be a more appropriate multi-use firearm.) Really, in any survival situation in which a hiker is likely to find himself, keeping himself fed is not topping the priorities list." -Dean

I may have to disagree with the implication that this design is useless. I think this could be an essential tool for those of us who choose to embark on those "incredibly remote hikes."

Maintaining your core body temperature is probably top priority for survival. After keeping hydrated, wouldn't food still be a very important third place necessity for one's survival? Especially if resupply is not an option.

I have never seen a rifle this light, and although this design has yet to prove it self in the field, I always like to see new innovative ideas. I hope to see more people come up with new concepts for ultralight rifles.

-Sid

Brett Morgan
(whyDRIVE) - F

Locale: East Tennessee
guns in the mountains?? on 10/07/2009 22:32:13 MDT Print View

would anybody actually use this or am I just imagining things?

Mark McLauchlin
(markmclauchlin) - MLife

Locale: Western Australia
Re: guns in the mountains?? on 10/07/2009 22:41:29 MDT Print View

I still can't get over the fact that you guys and gals in the US hike with guns, man that's just nuts.

I get it from a safety point of view, wild bears and stuff, but hey, still seems crazy to me.

Each to his own though

Kevin Lutz
(mtntrailrunner) - F
Re: Ultralight Rifle on 10/07/2009 22:46:58 MDT Print View

A22LR loaded one round at a time is not exactly serious firepower. The weight has been pared down too low at the cost of function. Anyone in true need of a firearm could do much better at lesser cost. But it could be argued that it's better than nothing.

Brian UL
(MAYNARD76)

Locale: New England
Re: Ultralight Rifle on 10/07/2009 23:39:39 MDT Print View

For small game I would think a simple sling shot is lighter cheaper and has less moving parts so is more reliable.
Sling shots have always been used by country farmers to hunt rabbits, Grey squirrels and such, is this rifle meant for anything more than that?

Rog Tallbloke
(tallbloke) - F

Locale: DON'T LOOK DOWN!!
Re: Ultralight Rifle on 10/08/2009 01:04:37 MDT Print View

For a few more grams I'd like to see a trigger guard on that thing. It's an accident waiting to happen IMO.

Please tell me it has a safety catch.

Edited by tallbloke on 10/08/2009 01:06:28 MDT.

Dewey Riesterer
(Kutenay) - F
Hiking with guns on 10/08/2009 03:59:21 MDT Print View

The rot of statist control of individuals has certainly affected some here very deeply and that is sad to see. Anyone who would actually post that hiking or any other legitimate activity with a gun is somehow ...nuts... should seriously question his own prejudices and the destruction of freedom in the British Commonwealth, during the 20thC.

I HAVE not only hiked, but, actually lived alone in some of the remote and very wild regions mentioned and, quite frankly, a good gun on my pack is a very welcome feeling, as it is in the big seaport city I now reside in, with it's "multicultural" stabbings, lethal home invasions and shootings by gangs of "non-traditional" immigrants, allowed entry by leftist-liberal politicians and gutless cultural traitors.

This particular "gun" is junk and worthless and, btw, a shotgun in a "survival" situation, in most respects, is a poor choice. This is due to the weight and bulk of the ammo and it's relatively poor performance as a defence against aggressive bears, where that is a concern.

A tested, reliable, compact rifle is a far superior choice and for longer wilderness stints, a really good .22 pistol is also very useful. A 20" bbl.ed .308Win. plus an S&W K-22 is a very sound combo in most regions, with the .308 being replaced by a compact .375H&H in coastal B.C.-Alaska where Grizzlies are numerous, huge and sometimes truculent.

This opinion is based on decades of personal experience in exactly these areas, btw, not on what some urban "gun writer" published or posted on the 'net. So, I would not waste .02 on this "Pac-Rifle" pos.

Sanad Toukhly
(Red_Fox) - MLife

Locale: South Florida
Re: Hiking with guns on 10/08/2009 04:36:55 MDT Print View

First off, I would like to say for those of you who are calling this gun "junk", I would like to see a field report before this claim has any credibility whatsoever.

Obviously, a gun like this is not intended for self defense. However, when used for what it is most likely designed for, hunting small game, I think this gun could perform just fine. There is nowhere on the Pak Rifle website that labels their product as a "survival" rifle. I'm sure they realize this gun is not meant for self defense.

If you want to carry a firearm that has enough firepower to take down a bear, you can forget about going ultralight. What everyone is forgetting here is this weighs 16 oz. No other rifle comes close to this weight. Surely as fellow ultralighters, you must realize that most things ultralight usually sacrifice something for the weight savings.

Brian,
As for a slingshot being more reliable, I wouldn't bet on it. Aside from the fact that the bands snap ALL the time (from personal experience), they do not have adequate range to have consistently successful hunts, IMO.

-Sid

Chris W
(simplespirit) - MLife

Locale: .
Re: Ultralight Rifle on 10/08/2009 04:58:28 MDT Print View

Brief review by Ryan

Mark McLauchlin
(markmclauchlin) - MLife

Locale: Western Australia
Re: Re: Ultralight Rifle on 10/08/2009 05:13:20 MDT Print View

@Dewey - It was not my intention to offend, I use the word "nuts" at the concept, not the people.

Miguel Arboleda
(butuki) - MLife

Locale: Kanto Plain, Japan
Re: Ultralight Rifle- Racist Remarks on 10/08/2009 06:27:02 MDT Print View

I had no intention of sticking my hand into another gun thread, but when I read this: "as it is in the big seaport city I now reside in, with it's "multicultural" stabbings, lethal home invasions and shootings by gangs of "non-traditional" immigrants, allowed entry by leftist-liberal politicians and gutless cultural traitors." I just had to say something.

Look, though I don't agree with guns personally, I figure that there are people here who use them so I should leave their threads alone, as long as I am not personally threatened by anyone carrying a gun (which I have, by someone who wasn't a "non-traditional" immigrant), including anyone here. I'm learning to leave other people to their own devices. I often read threads such as this so as to see a little better into the minds and hearts of people with whom I might disagree, and have promised myself not to react and write my own opinions about those topics in threads such as this.

But, YOU KNOW, I am getting MIGHTY TIRED of the racist innuendos and veiled threats to anyone who is not white. As a non-white I've gotten this kind of @&('#%&! all my life and I DON'T WANT TO SEE IT, EVEN IN PASSING! I don't care what you feel about your culture or government. I don't care what you perceive as the cause for problems in your area, LEAVE THE RACIST REMARKS OFF THE BPL FORUM!

Why the he(( must I put up with this, day after day, year after year, decade after decade? Seeing something like the above comment really makes it hard to simply enjoy what should be a friendly and close-knit community.

Edited by butuki on 10/08/2009 06:39:17 MDT.

Keith Selbo
(herman666) - F - M

Locale: Northern Virginia
bigotry on 10/08/2009 06:42:15 MDT Print View

I'm inclined to agree. The post had far more to do with a political philosophy with bigotry at its heart than anything related to lightweight backpacking.

daltrey park
(daltrey) - F
accident on 10/08/2009 07:12:23 MDT Print View

That just looks like an accident waiting to happen. I'm a fisherman and a hunter. I carry a lightweight flyrod with me on alot of hikes and there is a reason that rods flex. I was also taught alot of respect for a firearm before I was ever even allowed to hold one. In no way should a firearm be flung around like a flyrod. It doesn't matter if the ammo is out of it or not. All guns should be treated as if they were loaded at all times. This will definitely win a Darwin award sooner or later.

Luke Schmidt
(Cameron) - MLife

Locale: The WOODS
Drop it on 10/08/2009 07:22:05 MDT Print View

This is a discussion that won't go anywhere good (the politics part) can we just drop it? Most of us in the U.S. don't hike with guns. That said folks that do aren't for the most part a bunch of psycho militia types, trust me because I grew up with them. Okay I've said my peice now I'll try to shut up. Lets talk about backpacking again.
I don't see why we can't discuss the idea of ultralight grouse hunting without getting into unrelated political issues.